Should I root my Android device? (Read before voting)

  • Yes

    Votes: 13 56.5%
  • No (Explain)

    Votes: 7 30.4%
  • Use another OS (Please Specify & Explain)

    Votes: 3 13.0%
  • Total voters
    23

LukeLovesSecurity

Level 4
Verified
I want to root my android device for a few good reasons. Firstly, I want to be able to have a firewall that is on 24/7. I can not use a no-root firewall as it won't allow me to use a VPN. Secondly, I want to delete the bloatware that comes preinstalled with the device. It takes up space and acts as spyware. I want to move as far away from Google and Samsung applications as possible. The only reason I am using Android over Replicant or LineageOS is simply because I want to be able to install apps from the Playstore. If there were a way to install Android apps on Replicant OS, I would make the switch in a heartbeat. But since that isn't the case, I want to root my device to then modify it to match my needs.

So should I root my device? Or are there other ways to get what I want?
 

Deletedmessiah

Level 22
Verified
Content Creator
Your choice. Rooting will make it difficult to install updates in your phone and you'll have to do workarounds for some apps to work, those apps who detect root and won't work. It will increase the vulnerability of your device. On other hand, it will give you more control over your device, more features, better privacy and performance if you know what you're doing.
I don't think there're other ways to get what you want. Google won't give you more access to Android natively because then people will block their data collection spying services.
So if you really know what you're doing and your phone isn't getting any more updates, rooting would be fine.
 
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Exterminator

Community Manager
Verified
Staff member
Rooting your phone has many advantages.However the one disadvantage is bricking your device if your not absolutely sure how to root it.
The advantages are many...................
Overclocking your processor
Removing stock apps that you do not want
Using a multitude of apps not available to you on a stock device.
Full control of your device.
I voted yes but that is because I have done it many times.
If you are new to rooting a device be sure and do your homework before attempting it.
This is probably the best place to start and learn Android Forum for Mobile Phones, Tablets, Watches & Android App Development - XDA Forums
 

jogs

Level 20
Verified
The above posts have clearly stated the pros and cons of rooting. But nothing can be gained without taking risk. We tweak our PCs a lot but don't do much to our phones (my personal opinion), the result we get is mostly good. So, go ahead and root it but be prepared to do some work.
 
D

Deleted member 178

I want to root my android device for a few good reasons.
Which often reveals to be bad.

Firstly, I want to be able to have a firewall that is on 24/7. I can not use a no-root firewall as it won't allow me to use a VPN.
You don't need a firewall. You are not on a PC with people trying to break-in your phone via open ports....

Secondly, I want to delete the bloatware that comes preinstalled with the device. It takes up space and acts as spyware. I want to move as far away from Google and Samsung applications as possible.
So why bought a Samsung-Android in the first place?
I bought a Sony Xperia, it has some bloats but it allows me to remove most of them; before i bought a Huawei; i could remove all bloats without rooting it.

I want to root my device to then modify it to match my needs.
You don't need root for that, find the proper apps.

So should I root my device? Or are there other ways to get what I want?
if you don't care of bricking it or voiding your warranty then do it; i always rooted off-warranty phones. Never on-warranty ones.
Not saying, rooting is like removing the SUA on Windows, you let yourself more vulnerable.
 
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Deletedmessiah

Level 22
Verified
Content Creator
If you have Samsung device, you can download package disabler app, costs less than 2 dollars and disables any app without root.

You don't need a firewall. You are not on a PC with people trying to break-in your phone via open ports....
It can be useful to block apps from using internet, like video player apps don't need internet to work, but they connect to the internet to show ads and collect user data.
 
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D

Deleted member 178

If you have Samsung device, you can download package disabler app, costs less than 2 dollars and disables any app without root.
It can be useful to block apps for using internet, like video player apps don't need internet to work, but they connect to the internet to show ads and collect user data.
You have some apps to block this. I use Adguard, it has a Pseudo-Firewall module on it.
 

Danielx64

Level 10
Verified
The above posts have clearly stated the pros and cons of rooting. But nothing can be gained without taking risk. We tweak our PCs a lot but don't do much to our phones (my personal opinion), the result we get is mostly good. So, go ahead and root it but be prepared to do some work.
The trouble is that if one [removed] up windows we can do a reinstall without much trouble. I don't think the same can be said for a phone.

Rooting will void your warranty, unless your phone is one of the few where the manufacturer permits rooting or is an old one where you can reset the "rooting" counter, just mentioning it so you know
Pretty much this really.

Also you can have a firewall without root, I use Adguard for Android (AdGuard — Adblock for Android | Overview | AdGuard) and guess what? I can block anything from accessing the internet. So really there is no need to root phone, period.

Edit: @Umbra must be reading my mind :eek:
 

Deletedmessiah

Level 22
Verified
Content Creator
What do you mean about knox license? I never heard of such thing. And what that got to do with Adguard?
License for using Samsung knox API. Using that API, the app would be able to block ads natively without root, VPN or proxy and it would block ads efficiently like root based adblockers. There was an adblocker using it called adhell which is now banned. Disconnect pro(block trackers) using this API and is still available but is expensive. Adguard couldn't get license because that particular API was only for Business, scroll down for more info: Implement "Knox" filtering mode for Samsung devices · Issue #813 · AdguardTeam/AdguardForAndroid · GitHub
 

Danielx64

Level 10
Verified
License for using Samsung knox API. Using that API, the app would be able to block ads natively without root, VPN or proxy and it would block ads efficiently like root based adblockers. There was an adblocker using it called adhell which is now banned. Disconnect pro(block trackers) using this API and is still available but is expensive. Adguard couldn't get license because that particular API was only for Business, scroll down for more info: Implement "Knox" filtering mode for Samsung devices · Issue #813 · AdguardTeam/AdguardForAndroid · GitHub
Thank you for the link. You can still use Adugard, just that you would need to use it in VPN mode.

Also I discovered that you can use SOME external VPN providers as stated here:

AdGuard — Adblock for Android | Overview | AdGuard

Сan I use a different VPN app along with AdGuard?
Unfortunately, it is impossible to run two VPNs at the same time on Android, but there are some ways to circumvent this limitation. If your device is rooted, or if you only care about blocking ads in WiFi networks, you can switch AdGuard to proxy mode and let any other app to use VPN. Additionally, some VPNs allow the use of upstream proxy (e.g. PIA VPN, Nord VPN) — check if your specific VPN provides this option.
 
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