Should Microsoft follow in Google’s footsteps and introduce an ad blocker in Edge browser?

  • Yes

    Votes: 28 57.1%
  • No

    Votes: 5 10.2%
  • I don't care

    Votes: 16 32.7%
  • Total voters
    49

FreddyFreeloader

Level 31
Verified
Rumor has it that Google might be working on developing its very on ad blocker for Chrome browser, and although at first glance this doesn’t make any sense since Google itself is making a fortune out of ads, it all comes down to a very complex strategy that makes the search giant the big winner of this.

In just a few words, Google Chrome’s new built-in ad-blocker could allow the Mountain View-based company to stop paying companies like Adblock Plus for whitelisting its ads, while at the same time offering users an advanced solution to benefit from a clean browsing experience.

Only the most annoying ads would be blocked, according to existing speculation, and with Chrome holding a 60 percent market share on the PC, more than half of the users out there would at least give this ad blocker a try.

Microsoft Edge and the ad blockers
Microsoft Edge is one of the newest names in the browser wars, as Microsoft replaced Internet Explorer with a new browser in Windows 10 in an attempt to provide users with a more advanced solution that’s integrated by default into the operating system.

Adoption of Edge, however, is stagnating, partially due to the fact that the browser is only available in Windows 10, and new features are only delivered with big OS releases, which typically arrive twice every year.

Until now, however, Microsoft has ignored one of the top requests for Edge: a built-in ad blocker that would help provide a cleaner browsing experience. While ad blockers are already available on Edge as third-party extensions, just like they are on Chrome, users are requesting a built-in solution that wouldn’t affect system performance or browsing speed, which is exactly what Google is aiming for with its new solution.

Should Microsoft follow in Google’s footsteps and introduce an ad blocker in Edge browser? Probably, especially because in addition to offering innovating features, like web annotations and Cortana integration, Microsoft also needs to provide users with the essential tools that are already available on rival browsers.

And unfortunately, some of these features are still missing, though it’s hard to find a reason for this. For example, a dedicated full-screen mode is not yet implemented in Edge and there’s a good chance it won’t land until the Redstone 3 OS update lands in the fall.
 

Kubla

Level 6
Verified
A google made ad blocker will only block what google wants it to block and allow the rest so most who use and ad blocker to block ad's will never use it.

Microsoft might be better off releasing the source code for Edge like Chromium for Chrome that will only run on Windows 10 but allow 3rd party developers to create extensions, themes, hybrid versions, etc... with the thinking that the more popular, more secure it becomes the more people will migrate Windows 10 to use it.
 

Marko :)

Level 14
Verified
I have nothing against clean and normal ads and I understand people who put them on their website. The ads which I cannot stand are those with jumping popups which sometimes close automatically, showing me inappropriate content and the ones that redirect me to weird domain names (with random numbers and letters). I get that people have to make money somehow, but is it really necessary to put jumping and malicious ads on their website? So, my vote goes to yes because this will make browsing more faster and secure.
 

Winter Soldier

Level 25
Honestly I think non-invasive ads can be tolerated but the aggressive ones and malversting have to be blocked for sure.
I am Adguard user and I accept the "useful" ads, according to Adguard filter.
The problem, according to me, is that Edge and Chrome could, of course, follow the road to their favour in order to not damage the advertisers but I think that I might lose the control on what to block and what not.
This is a move of convenience for them but not for me.
 

rockstarrocks

Level 18
Verified
I have nothing against clean and normal ads and I understand people who put them on their website. The ads which I cannot stand are those with jumping popups which sometimes close automatically, showing me inappropriate content and the ones that redirect me to weird domain names (with random numbers and letters). I get that people have to make money somehow, but is it really necessary to put jumping and malicious ads on their website? So, my vote goes to yes because this will make browsing more faster and secure.
Well Google CAN actually change the Ads industry for the better, they have the muscles required. Also I think majority of the internet users have no problem against ads, provided they doesn't ruin the site content.
But because of the current situation i block all the ads and whitelist most of the sites which doesn't have "dancing/in-appropiate ads" as you said.
 

Deletedmessiah

Level 22
Verified
Content Creator
I have nothing against clean and normal ads and I understand people who put them on their website. The ads which I cannot stand are those with jumping popups which sometimes close automatically, showing me inappropriate content and the ones that redirect me to weird domain names (with random numbers and letters). I get that people have to make money somehow, but is it really necessary to put jumping and malicious ads on their website? So, my vote goes to yes because this will make browsing more faster and secure.
Well said. If the ads were well behaved and safe, I would not look for adblockers in the 1st place. Ads slow down your internet, make your browser lag, track you all the time, opens numerous tabs and popups making you unable to view the content you were looking for in the 1st place and some even infect your device with malware. Some shows explict and pornographic ads, they will give bad image to the people around you. Only very few sites have well behaved ads which I whitelist.
 

Deletedmessiah

Level 22
Verified
Content Creator
A google made ad blocker will only block what google wants it to block and allow the rest so most who use and ad blocker to block ad's will never use it.

Microsoft might be better off releasing the source code for Edge like Chromium for Chrome that will only run on Windows 10 but allow 3rd party developers to create extensions, themes, hybrid versions, etc... with the thinking that the more popular, more secure it becomes the more people will migrate Windows 10 to use it.
It would be awesome if Microsoft were to open source Edge. More competition is always better. But to your other point, if source code is available then Edge fork will be available to other platforms too. This won't be a factor at all to move people to Windows 10.
 

Deletedmessiah

Level 22
Verified
Content Creator
Honestly I think non-invasive ads can be tolerated but the aggressive ones and malversting have to be blocked for sure.
I am Adguard user and I accept the "useful" ads, according to Adguard filter.
The problem, according to me, is that Edge and Chrome could, of course, follow the road to their favour in order to not damage the advertisers but I think that I might lose the control on what to block and what not.
This is a move of convenience for them but not for me.
Indeed. Google will only be blocking malicious ads and maybe some extremely obnoxious ones like jumping ads, redirection, long video ads etc. Tracking, picture ads, animated ads will still remain. And they're sure to take money from advertisers to whitelist like ABP does. These bad ads are slowly making even the tech illiterates to use adblock, Google wouldn't want to lose them. Block the worst type of ads to prevent them from using other adblocks. Average users won't be bothered by less obnoxious ads and tracking.
 

liubomirwm

Level 5
I said no to this. I do use Microsoft Edge since the Creators Update, but I don't think that Google does good thing for the users and I don't think that Microsoft should blindly follow Google at this. AdBlockers should be left open-source and free from ad revenue companies. There are already enough AdBlockers for Edge, Microsoft wouldn't bother to do yet another one. If Google wanted to make the ad industry better they would make Acceptable ads rules for their almost ubiquitous advertisement programs. They just want to limit the competitor's ads and stop people from installing the dangerous for their income 3rd party AdBlockers which have stricter policies. I always keep my Acceptable Ads on and always report anti-adblockers to the list maintainers and then go to a competitor's site. Only that way we can force the Ad industry to become better. They are so hungry for money that they've literally gone out of the normal.
 

liubomirwm

Level 5
If these companies are making adblockers then only malicious ads should be blocked, not all including clean ones, otherwise what internet would be without this business?
We do have third party adblockers but an average internet user knows nothing about them, which is in favour or web.
In favor of ad companies maybe, in favor of web - no. Ads should be a static image which doesn't interrupt the users flow of reading/text, is clearly marked as ad and definitely doesn't popup. Hopefully there popup blockers and adblock open-source independent people who adore their cause by heart and they are the ones who push the web forward, not the advertisement companies. I do happen to like advertisements from Taboola by the way, they are unblocked by my adblocker.