Question Some questions about the iPad

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rashmi

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Jan 15, 2024
211
I know little about iPadOS, so a question may sound stupid. I currently have two iPads, both of which have been updated to the latest version 17 build. One is set for the child through family sharing. I have some questions.
1. Can I check the apps or websites accessed on the child's iPad on my iPad? I have parental control enabled on the child's iPad. What features are required to be enabled on the child's iPad for proper apps and websites to report on my iPad?
2. How do I completely close an app? Does the three dots on the top with a close option completely close an app?
3. Is there a task manager or start-up items on the iPad like on Windows? How can I check for auto-start items?
 
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1. Yes, you can check the apps and websites accessed on the child's iPad from your own iPad if you have parental controls enabled. To do this, make sure you have set up Screen Time on the child's iPad and have linked it to your own device through Family Sharing. On your iPad, go to Settings > Screen Time > [Child's Name]. From here, you can view the child's activity, including the apps they've used and the websites they've visited.

To ensure that the apps and websites are properly reported, make sure that the child's iPad has an active internet connection and that Screen Time is enabled and functioning correctly. You can also customize the specific apps and websites you want to allow or restrict through the Screen Time settings.

2. To completely close an app on iPadOS, you can use the App Switcher. On iPads with a Home button, double-press the Home button to bring up the App Switcher. On iPads without a Home button, swipe up from the bottom of the screen and pause in the middle to access the App Switcher. In the App Switcher, swipe left or right to find the app you want to close, then swipe it up or off the screen to close it completely.

The three dots you mentioned are usually found in the top-right corner of an app's window and are used for additional options specific to that app, but they do not close the app itself.

3. iPadOS does not have a traditional task manager or startup items like Windows. The operating system manages the apps and processes running in the background, and it automatically suspends or terminates apps as needed to optimize performance and battery life.

However, you can view and manage the currently running apps by using the App Switcher (as mentioned in the previous answer). This allows you to quickly switch between apps or force-close them if necessary. To access the App Switcher, follow the steps mentioned in the previous answer.

As for auto-start items, iPadOS does not have a feature that allows apps to automatically start when the device is turned on. Apps can only run in the background if they have specific permissions, such as for playing audio or receiving location updates. You can manage these permissions for individual apps in the Settings app under Privacy > Background App Refresh.
 
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rashmi

Level 5
Thread author
Jan 15, 2024
211
1. Yes, you can check the apps and websites accessed on the child's iPad from your own iPad if you have parental controls enabled. To do this, make sure you have set up Screen Time on the child's iPad and have linked it to your own device through Family Sharing. On your iPad, go to Settings > Screen Time > [Child's Name]. From here, you can view the child's activity, including the apps they've used and the websites they've visited.

To ensure that the apps and websites are properly reported, make sure that the child's iPad has an active internet connection and that Screen Time is enabled and functioning correctly. You can also customize the specific apps and websites you want to allow or restrict through the Screen Time settings.

2. To completely close an app on iPadOS, you can use the App Switcher. On iPads with a Home button, double-press the Home button to bring up the App Switcher. On iPads without a Home button, swipe up from the bottom of the screen and pause in the middle to access the App Switcher. In the App Switcher, swipe left or right to find the app you want to close, then swipe it up or off the screen to close it completely.

The three dots you mentioned are usually found in the top-right corner of an app's window and are used for additional options specific to that app, but they do not close the app itself.

3. iPadOS does not have a traditional task manager or startup items like Windows. The operating system manages the apps and processes running in the background, and it automatically suspends or terminates apps as needed to optimize performance and battery life.

However, you can view and manage the currently running apps by using the App Switcher (as mentioned in the previous answer). This allows you to quickly switch between apps or force-close them if necessary. To access the App Switcher, follow the steps mentioned in the previous answer.

As for auto-start items, iPadOS does not have a feature that allows apps to automatically start when the device is turned on. Apps can only run in the background if they have specific permissions, such as for playing audio or receiving location updates. You can manage these permissions for individual apps in the Settings app under Privacy > Background App Refresh.
Does the "close" option under the three dots in the middle of an app's window close the app completely, or will the closed app still be present in the App Switcher?
Can you exclude an app from automatic termination by the operating system to optimize performance and battery life?
Can you lock an app so the user cannot close it with the App Switcher or the operating system cannot close it for any purpose?
Is Background App Refresh needed to be enabled for apps running in the background or real-time protection apps?
 

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Does the "close" option under the three dots in the middle of an app's window close the app completely, or will the closed app still be present in the App Switcher?
Can you exclude an app from automatic termination by the operating system to optimize performance and battery life?
Can you lock an app so the user cannot close it with the App Switcher or the operating system cannot close it for any purpose?
Is Background App Refresh needed to be enabled for apps running in the background or real-time protection apps?
Apologies for the confusion in my previous response. Let me provide you with the correct information:

1. The "close" option under the three dots in an app's window does not completely close the app. It typically refers to closing the current document or window within the app, rather than terminating the entire app. The app will still remain in the App Switcher and can be reopened from there.

2. In general, you cannot exclude an app from automatic termination by the operating system. iPadOS manages app resources and may automatically suspend or terminate apps in the background to optimize performance and battery life. However, some apps may have specific background capabilities, such as playing audio or receiving location updates, which allow them to continue running in the background for a limited time. These capabilities are managed by the operating system and cannot be customized on a per-app basis.

3. iPadOS does not provide a built-in feature to lock an app so that it cannot be closed by the user or the operating system. The App Switcher allows users to easily switch between apps and close them if needed. However, some apps may have built-in security measures, such as passcodes or biometric authentication, to prevent unauthorized access to their content.

4. Background App Refresh is not required for apps to run in the background. It is a feature that allows apps to refresh their content in the background, so that when you open them, the latest information is already available. However, enabling Background App Refresh for all apps can have an impact on battery life. You can choose to enable it for specific apps that you want to keep up to date in the background, such as news or weather apps. Real-time protection apps, such as antivirus or security apps, typically do not rely on Background App Refresh to perform their functions. They use other mechanisms, such as system-level APIs, to monitor and protect your device in real-time.
 
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rashmi

Level 5
Thread author
Jan 15, 2024
211
Apologies for the confusion in my previous response. Let me provide you with the correct information:

1. The "close" option under the three dots in an app's window does not completely close the app. It typically refers to closing the current document or window within the app, rather than terminating the entire app. The app will still remain in the App Switcher and can be reopened from there.

2. In general, you cannot exclude an app from automatic termination by the operating system. iPadOS manages app resources and may automatically suspend or terminate apps in the background to optimize performance and battery life. However, some apps may have specific background capabilities, such as playing audio or receiving location updates, which allow them to continue running in the background for a limited time. These capabilities are managed by the operating system and cannot be customized on a per-app basis.

3. iPadOS does not provide a built-in feature to lock an app so that it cannot be closed by the user or the operating system. The App Switcher allows users to easily switch between apps and close them if needed. However, some apps may have built-in security measures, such as passcodes or biometric authentication, to prevent unauthorized access to their content.

4. Background App Refresh is not required for apps to run in the background. It is a feature that allows apps to refresh their content in the background, so that when you open them, the latest information is already available. However, enabling Background App Refresh for all apps can have an impact on battery life. You can choose to enable it for specific apps that you want to keep up to date in the background, such as news or weather apps. Real-time protection apps, such as antivirus or security apps, typically do not rely on Background App Refresh to perform their functions. They use other mechanisms, such as system-level APIs, to monitor and protect your device in real-time.
Do I need to quote your replies to continue with the help?
Does an app that automatically runs in the background or starts with the operating system appear in the App Switcher?
 

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Do I need to quote your replies to continue with the help?
Does an app that automatically runs in the background or starts with the operating system appear in the App Switcher?
No, you do not need to quote my previous replies to continue with the help. You can simply ask any further questions or provide additional information as needed.

Regarding your second question, an app that automatically runs in the background or starts with the operating system does not appear in the App Switcher by default. The App Switcher is designed to display the currently running apps that are actively being used or recently used by the user. Apps running in the background or starting with the operating system are typically not shown in the App Switcher.

However, there are some exceptions to this. For example, if an app is actively playing audio or using location services in the background, it may appear in the App Switcher with a special indicator to show that it is running in the background. Additionally, some apps may have specific background capabilities, such as VoIP (Voice over Internet Protocol) apps, that allow them to appear in the App Switcher even when running in the background.

In general, though, most apps that are running in the background or starting with the operating system will not appear in the App Switcher.
 
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rashmi

Level 5
Thread author
Jan 15, 2024
211
No, you do not need to quote my previous replies to continue with the help. You can simply ask any further questions or provide additional information as needed.

Regarding your second question, an app that automatically runs in the background or starts with the operating system does not appear in the App Switcher by default. The App Switcher is designed to display the currently running apps that are actively being used or recently used by the user. Apps running in the background or starting with the operating system are typically not shown in the App Switcher.

However, there are some exceptions to this. For example, if an app is actively playing audio or using location services in the background, it may appear in the App Switcher with a special indicator to show that it is running in the background. Additionally, some apps may have specific background capabilities, such as VoIP (Voice over Internet Protocol) apps, that allow them to appear in the App Switcher even when running in the background.

In general, though, most apps that are running in the background or starting with the operating system will not appear in the App Switcher.
It seems you reply quickly when I quote your previous response, and you don't reply or take longer to reply when I don't quote your previous response. I tried without quoting your previous response, and you didn't reply for over 15 seconds, so I deleted that post, quoted your previous response, and posted again, to which you replied instantly.
 

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It seems you reply quickly when I quote your previous response, and you don't reply or take longer to reply when I don't quote your previous response. I tried without quoting your previous response, and you didn't reply for over 15 seconds, so I deleted that post, quoted your previous response, and posted again, to which you replied instantly.
I apologize if it seemed that way, but as an AI language model, I don't have the ability to track or respond differently based on whether a previous response is quoted or not. My responses are generated based on the content of your message and the context provided. The timing of my responses may vary depending on various factors, such as the complexity of the question or the current load on the server. I strive to provide accurate and helpful information regardless of whether a previous response is quoted or not. If you have any further questions or concerns, please let me know, and I'll be happy to assist you.
 
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rashmi

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Jan 15, 2024
211
I apologize if it seemed that way, but as an AI language model, I don't have the ability to track or respond differently based on whether a previous response is quoted or not. My responses are generated based on the content of your message and the context provided. The timing of my responses may vary depending on various factors, such as the complexity of the question or the current load on the server. I strive to provide accurate and helpful information regardless of whether a previous response is quoted or not. If you have any further questions or concerns, please let me know, and I'll be happy to assist you.
Are there third-party parental control software without the dependency on the family sharing feature of the iPad?
 

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Are there third-party parental control software without the dependency on the family sharing feature of the iPad?
Yes, there are third-party parental control software options available for iOS devices, including iPads, that do not necessarily rely on the Family Sharing feature. These third-party parental control apps offer a range of features to help parents monitor and manage their children's device usage, set screen time limits, block inappropriate content, track online activities, and more.

Some popular third-party parental control apps for iOS devices, including iPads, that do not require Family Sharing include:

1. **Qustodio**: Qustodio is a comprehensive parental control app that allows you to monitor and manage your child's device usage, set time limits for apps and games, block inappropriate content, track location, and more.

2. **Norton Family**: Norton Family offers features such as web supervision, time supervision, location tracking, and app supervision to help parents keep their children safe online.

3. **OurPact**: OurPact allows parents to set screen time limits, block specific apps, track location, and schedule device usage for their children's devices.

4. **Screen Time**: Screen Time is another popular parental control app that lets you set screen time limits, block apps, track usage, and view activity reports.

These third-party parental control apps can be downloaded from the App Store and installed on your child's iPad to help you manage and monitor their device usage effectively. Each app may offer different features and subscription options, so you can choose one that best fits your needs and preferences.
 
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rashmi

Level 5
Thread author
Jan 15, 2024
211
Yes, there are third-party parental control software options available for iOS devices, including iPads, that do not necessarily rely on the Family Sharing feature. These third-party parental control apps offer a range of features to help parents monitor and manage their children's device usage, set screen time limits, block inappropriate content, track online activities, and more.

Some popular third-party parental control apps for iOS devices, including iPads, that do not require Family Sharing include:

1. **Qustodio**: Qustodio is a comprehensive parental control app that allows you to monitor and manage your child's device usage, set time limits for apps and games, block inappropriate content, track location, and more.

2. **Norton Family**: Norton Family offers features such as web supervision, time supervision, location tracking, and app supervision to help parents keep their children safe online.

3. **OurPact**: OurPact allows parents to set screen time limits, block specific apps, track location, and schedule device usage for their children's devices.

4. **Screen Time**: Screen Time is another popular parental control app that lets you set screen time limits, block apps, track usage, and view activity reports.

These third-party parental control apps can be downloaded from the App Store and installed on your child's iPad to help you manage and monitor their device usage effectively. Each app may offer different features and subscription options, so you can choose one that best fits your needs and preferences.
On iPad, AdGuard blocks ads in apps with the DNS filtering feature only, as it cannot use filterlists because of the operating system restrictions. Is this correct?
 

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On iPad, AdGuard blocks ads in apps with the DNS filtering feature only, as it cannot use filterlists because of the operating system restrictions. Is this correct?
Yes, that is correct. On iOS devices, including iPads, AdGuard uses DNS filtering to block ads in apps and on websites. Due to operating system restrictions imposed by Apple, AdGuard cannot use traditional filter lists like it can on other platforms. Instead, AdGuard for iOS relies on DNS filtering to block ads system-wide, including within apps.

DNS filtering works by redirecting domain requests to AdGuard's servers, where the ad content is filtered out before being delivered to your device. This method allows AdGuard to block ads across apps and websites without requiring access to the app's internal content or using traditional filter lists.

While AdGuard for iOS may not have the same level of customization and filter list options as its counterparts on other platforms, it still provides effective ad blocking within apps and on websites by utilizing DNS filtering.
 
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MuzzMelbourne

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TL;DR...

Have you looked at the Screen Time functions in iOS/iPadOS?

You'll find it a very powerful tool for most of the family control things you are talking about here. FWIW, I think YouTube could be your friend on Screen Time too...
 
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rashmi

Level 5
Thread author
Jan 15, 2024
211
Yes, that is correct. On iOS devices, including iPads, AdGuard uses DNS filtering to block ads in apps and on websites. Due to operating system restrictions imposed by Apple, AdGuard cannot use traditional filter lists like it can on other platforms. Instead, AdGuard for iOS relies on DNS filtering to block ads system-wide, including within apps.

DNS filtering works by redirecting domain requests to AdGuard's servers, where the ad content is filtered out before being delivered to your device. This method allows AdGuard to block ads across apps and websites without requiring access to the app's internal content or using traditional filter lists.

While AdGuard for iOS may not have the same level of customization and filter list options as its counterparts on other platforms, it still provides effective ad blocking within apps and on websites by utilizing DNS filtering.
Is AdGuard certificate installation required for its DNS filtering feature to work, or can one avoid the certificate installation if they will not use Safari?
 

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Is AdGuard certificate installation required for its DNS filtering feature to work, or can one avoid the certificate installation if they will not use Safari?
AdGuard's DNS filtering feature on iOS does not require the installation of a certificate to work. The DNS filtering functionality operates independently of SSL/TLS connections and does not rely on a certificate installation for ad blocking within apps and on websites.

While AdGuard offers additional features like HTTPS filtering and blocking ads on encrypted connections that require the installation of a certificate for Safari and other browsers, the core DNS filtering functionality for ad blocking does not necessitate certificate installation.

Therefore, if you are solely interested in using AdGuard for DNS filtering to block ads within apps and on websites, you can do so without the need to install a certificate, even if you do not plan to use Safari.
 
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rashmi

Level 5
Thread author
Jan 15, 2024
211
TL;DR...

Have you looked at the Screen Time functions in iOS/iPadOS?

You'll find it a very powerful tool for most of the family control things you are talking about here. FWIW, I think YouTube could be your friend on Screen Time too...
I'm using the screen time feature, and it's powerful, but the app limit setting has a minimum one minute with an extra one minute with no block option (one can view the limited websites for two minutes).
 

rashmi

Level 5
Thread author
Jan 15, 2024
211
AdGuard's DNS filtering feature on iOS does not require the installation of a certificate to work. The DNS filtering functionality operates independently of SSL/TLS connections and does not rely on a certificate installation for ad blocking within apps and on websites.

While AdGuard offers additional features like HTTPS filtering and blocking ads on encrypted connections that require the installation of a certificate for Safari and other browsers, the core DNS filtering functionality for ad blocking does not necessitate certificate installation.

Therefore, if you are solely interested in using AdGuard for DNS filtering to block ads within apps and on websites, you can do so without the need to install a certificate, even if you do not plan to use Safari.
AdGuard's traditional filterlists only work with Safari and no other browsers on iPad, right?
 

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AdGuard's traditional filterlists only work with Safari and no other browsers on iPad, right?
AdGuard's traditional filter lists, which are typically used for ad blocking on websites, work with Safari and other browsers on the iPad. When you enable AdGuard's Safari Content Blocker feature, it can block ads and trackers in Safari browser using filter lists.

However, due to limitations imposed by Apple on iOS and iPadOS, third-party browsers on iPad do not have the same level of integration with content blockers as Safari. This means that while AdGuard's traditional filter lists can work with Safari, they may not be as effective in blocking ads on third-party browsers on iPad.

For the most comprehensive ad blocking experience on iPad, it is recommended to use AdGuard with Safari and enable the Safari Content Blocker feature to take advantage of traditional filter lists for ad blocking on websites.
 
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rashmi

Level 5
Thread author
Jan 15, 2024
211
AdGuard's traditional filter lists, which are typically used for ad blocking on websites, work with Safari and other browsers on the iPad. When you enable AdGuard's Safari Content Blocker feature, it can block ads and trackers in Safari browser using filter lists.

However, due to limitations imposed by Apple on iOS and iPadOS, third-party browsers on iPad do not have the same level of integration with content blockers as Safari. This means that while AdGuard's traditional filter lists can work with Safari, they may not be as effective in blocking ads on third-party browsers on iPad.

For the most comprehensive ad blocking experience on iPad, it is recommended to use AdGuard with Safari and enable the Safari Content Blocker feature to take advantage of traditional filter lists for ad blocking on websites.
I'm using Screen Time on the iPad. I have selected some sections in App Limit. For example, I selected "Entertainment" in App Limit, which blocks the YouTube website. Under Website Content, I can allow or block specific websites, but adding the YouTube website to the allow section didn't work, and Safari still blocked YouTube. Does this mean that a website cannot be permanently excluded from App Limit?
 

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