Vivaldi browser is a spy?

How do you think all browsers spy on users?

  • Yes, absolutely all browsers spy.

    Votes: 8 32.0%
  • Only some browsers (Google Chrome) spy, but there are browsers that don't spy (Firefox)

    Votes: 12 48.0%
  • No browser spies, they all send only anonymous telemetry to improve functionality in future updates.

    Votes: 5 20.0%

  • Total voters
    25

SFox

Level 4
Verified
Jun 11, 2019
151
I have been using Vivaldi browser for a long time. Convenient and functional browser. But spyshelter periodically showed me messages that Vivaldi was trying to register keystrokes (in essence, this is keylogging), and I created a rule forbidding the browser to do this. Once a day he makes an attempt, but spyshelter blocks this action. It is worth saying that periodically Firefox also registers keystrokes, while spyshelter automatically resolves this action. But it's about Vivaldi. Today, after updating the browser to the latest version, spyshelter displayed a message to me that it had not previously displayed. It concerned Vivaldi, who was trying to access BITS interprocess communication, if I write correctly. I didn’t particularly read and allowed this action, because when I blocked the browser began to crash. However, I’m interested in WHAT the browser did, because judging by the spyshelter log, the browser used some kind of utility to copy files from the hard disk or something like that. Recently I found a video where it was said that Vivaldi spies and once a day sends somewhere all the information about user sessions per day, using a unique identifier that is assigned to each user. I don’t know how true this is, and if it’s true, how much detailed information he sends, and whether other browsers do it. Now I’m wondering WHAT is the spyshelter logged for the browser action?
вивальди.png
 

SFox

Level 4
Verified
Jun 11, 2019
151
And what is incomprehensible? :) I periodically look at program logs, and if I notice some activity that was not there before, some suspicious actions, then I look for information about this, and if I cannot find such information, I ask the user community about what it could mean is espionage, this is normal behavior, or this is malicious activity. This is not only interesting, but also important to know. Once in this way I discovered a deeply penetrated virus in the system. Therefore, I ask about a specific browser action that has not previously been observed.
 

Cortex

Level 25
Verified
Aug 4, 2016
1,418
Vivaldi as I remember was built by former Opera developers, I've used it a little but a but too much customisation against Operas not enough :D Have you asked about this in the Vivaldi forum?
 
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SFox

Level 4
Verified
Jun 11, 2019
151
Vivaldi as I remember was built by former Opera developers, I've used it a little but a but too much customisation against Operas not enough :D Have you asked about this in the Vivaldi forum?
Yes, I will wait for an answer there too. I always play it safe a bit, and, as life shows, not in vain :) Once, I did not pay attention to the suspicious actions of the browser, and then I paid for it. Another time, I was more attentive and discovered a hidden virus. So it's better to play it safe than to solve problems later :)
 

upnorth

Moderator
Verified
Staff member
Malware Hunter
Jul 27, 2015
4,130
Last edited:

DDE_Server

Level 21
Verified
Sep 5, 2017
1,086
I have been using Vivaldi browser for a long time. Convenient and functional browser. But spyshelter periodically showed me messages that Vivaldi was trying to register keystrokes (in essence, this is keylogging), and I created a rule forbidding the browser to do this. Once a day he makes an attempt, but spyshelter blocks this action. It is worth saying that periodically Firefox also registers keystrokes, while spyshelter automatically resolves this action. But it's about Vivaldi. Today, after updating the browser to the latest version, spyshelter displayed a message to me that it had not previously displayed. It concerned Vivaldi, who was trying to access BITS interprocess communication, if I write correctly. I didn’t particularly read and allowed this action, because when I blocked the browser began to crash. However, I’m interested in WHAT the browser did, because judging by the spyshelter log, the browser used some kind of utility to copy files from the hard disk or something like that. Recently I found a video where it was said that Vivaldi spies and once a day sends somewhere all the information about user sessions per day, using a unique identifier that is assigned to each user. I don’t know how true this is, and if it’s true, how much detailed information he sends, and whether other browsers do it. Now I’m wondering WHAT is the spyshelter logged for the browser action?
View attachment 233640
out of the topic which version of spyshelter do you use ??
 

DDE_Server

Level 21
Verified
Sep 5, 2017
1,086
Yes, I will wait for an answer there too. I always play it safe a bit, and, as life shows, not in vain :) Once, I did not pay attention to the suspicious actions of the browser, and then I paid for it. Another time, I was more attentive and discovered a hidden virus. So it's better to play it safe than to solve problems later :)
do you use special log management software ? i want also to be able to read logs to discover virus ??
 
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SFox

Level 4
Verified
Jun 11, 2019
151
do you use special log management software ? i want also to be able to read logs to discover virus ??
I myself go through the program logs and the Windows event log. Of course, it is more convenient to use specialized software that collects all the logs into one ready-made archive, for example, the AutoLogger program, maybe in the future I will use it. But for now, I myself look at the logs.
As for the virus, yes. That was a few years ago. Antivirus and antivirus scanners did not detect infection of the system, and only the Spychelter firewall issued warnings about the suspicious activity of the Microsoft Edge browser. Three days later, only Zemana Antimalware scanner was able to find the virus as a hidden entry in the registry.
 
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