Willians

Level 1
Good afternoon people

I would like your to recommend a good software for protection against ransomware that works together with Eset. Something like Trend Micro RansomBuster or Malwarebytes Anti-ransomware. I don't know which one is the best.
And no, I don't want to use Eset's HIPS to protect my folders ... This method generates a lot of warnings and popups.
 

James246

Level 1
Good afternoon people

I would like your to recommend a good software for protection against ransomware that works together with Eset. Something like Trend Micro RansomBuster or Malwarebytes Anti-ransomware. I don't know which one is the best.
And no, I don't want to use Eset's HIPS to protect my folders ... This method generates a lot of warnings and popups.
Why not try Kaspersky Anti-Ransomware Tool
 

MacDefender

Level 11
Verified
The only software that cannot fail against ransomware is backup or disk image software. So combine a good AV with good imaging software and you can be absolutely peaceful.
Lately, ransomware seems to have taken a more evil turn and started uploading your data to publish them. Sure, most home users don't have anything valuable like a company payroll system or hospital's patient records, but that might be one reason why ransomware protection is important even if you take great backups.

I do agree that for so many reasons, investing in a good backup strategy is paramount. For ransomware protection, you'd want something that is impossible for a compromised client device to delete existing backups.
 

Outpost

Level 5
Verified
Lately, ransomware seems to have taken a more evil turn and started uploading your data to publish them. Sure, most home users don't have anything valuable like a company payroll system or hospital's patient records, but that might be one reason why ransomware protection is important even if you take great backups.

I do agree that for so many reasons, investing in a good backup strategy is paramount. For ransomware protection, you'd want something that is impossible for a compromised client device to delete existing backups.


I agree with you, although this does not specifically involve home users. As far as I'm concerned, on my home PCs, I keep as few files as possible. Documents, photos, and videos are saved in a copy on 2 different external HD and on a cloud. Important files, personal accounting, bank, medical, or otherwise personal files are NOT saved in the cloud.
 

MacDefender

Level 11
Verified
I agree with you, although this does not specifically involve home users. As far as I'm concerned, on my home PCs, I keep as few files as possible. Documents, photos, and videos are saved in a copy on 2 different external HD and on a cloud. Important files, personal accounting, bank, medical, or otherwise personal files are NOT saved in the cloud.

Very similar practices here -- most of my documents are saved to a cloud service like OneDrive with built in rollback capabilities. I take periodic backups of my system onto a FreeNAS network appliance which uses ZFS snapshots, so that even if the SMB share's files get deleted, there are still ZFS snapshots hidden requiring the root password on that machine (which isn't shared or stored on any other machine)

On top of that, additional precautions I take due to sometimes playing with malware samples -- malware testing happens on my network on a different VLAN which is automatically routed out through a VPN but regardless is unable to access my local network or talk to the firewalling appliance. On-device VPNs are probably enough, but I've planned with the worst case scenario where advanced malware may figure out how to bypass a VPN on the VM or be able to execute a VM to hypervisor escape.
 

DDE_Server

Level 21
Verified
Lately, ransomware seems to have taken a more evil turn and started uploading your data to publish them. Sure, most home users don't have anything valuable like a company payroll system or hospital's patient records, but that might be one reason why ransomware protection is important even if you take great backups.

I do agree that for so many reasons, investing in a good backup strategy is paramount. For ransomware protection, you'd want something that is impossible for a compromised client device to delete existing backups.
But what if this is combined with some type of important data Encryption it would be so far so good balanced solution in case of data breach
 

MacDefender

Level 11
Verified
But what if this is combined with some type of important data Encryption it would be so far so good balanced solution in case of data breach
Yeah for important data I think the only way is to encrypt it locally before backing up — either you trust the format’s inherent encryption (TurboTax) or wrap it in an encrypted virtual disk or encrypted archive.
 

DDE_Server

Level 21
Verified
Yeah for important data I think the only way is to encrypt it locally before backing up — either you trust the format’s inherent encryption (TurboTax) or wrap it in an encrypted virtual disk or encrypted archive.
yes any type of strong encryption such as AES 256 would be good if your important data is published by ransomware it would be non readable for public . then if you have a backup that would be good protection
 

MacDefender

Level 11
Verified
yes any type of strong encryption such as AES 256 would be good if your important data is published by ransomware it would be non readable for public . then if you have a backup that would be good protection

Yeah I would generally recommend using an encrypted virtual disk for your most prized secrets, and only mount it when you need access to it, unmount it otherwise. Things like PDFs of tax returns and other financially sensitive documents go in one of those for me (usually Veracrypt on Windows, the built in encrypted DMGs on macOS. I've heard some use encrypted VHDs on Windows as well)

It's more cumbersome, but security has never come free!
 

Back3

Level 5
I think a piece of software won't protect you against ransomware. You need to make sure..
A) that Windows and your software are regularly updated; that you have a good layered approach to security software, including your browsers;
B) that your backup strategy includes external disks not connected to your computer, cloud sync and encryption;
C) that you use double authentification on everything Microsoft, Apple, Google, Paypal......
 
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