show-Zi

Level 26
Verified
Japanese has completely different expressions and pronunciation depending on the region. The narration in this video sounds French, but it's Southern Japan. I can't understand without subtitles.


Japanese. I took 3 years in college. Just wish it was easier to practice Stateside.
When learning Japanese, the word 'standard language' which has been passed down to the national standard is used. If you use this, your will will will be conveyed to the other party. However, if you use it in the countryside of a local city, even if your words are conveyed to the other person, depending on the words the other person speaks, you may need to translate Japanese into Japanese.:geek:
 

bribon77

Level 33
Verified
Well, something happens that for those who do not speak a Latin language do not know, but those who speak do know. Italian and Spanish and Purtugues are understood in a great majority of words, with and the only one who does not understand so much is with French and is also a Latin language.
 

bribon77

Level 33
Verified
I found a video that could be helpful for “Japanese language problems that Japanese people cannot understand”.
The standard version and the northern Japanese version of the same song. The content is exactly the same, but the words and pronunciation used are completely different.

Standard version

Northern Japan version
well it will be a dialect, in Spain we also have the Basques, Galicians, Catalans, that a Spanish does not understand:LOL:
 

Burrito

Level 23
If in European countries that is so.
In the American countries no.:giggle:

In the US, there are definitely accents. There is a pronounced Southern accent. Small towns in the Appalachian mountains have what I'd call a 'hick accent.' There is certainly some inner-large-city English that is different. The Northern Central US has a more drawn out style of English.

I guess there was a time.... maybe 80 years ago and further where people literally could not understand each other from different parts of the country. But I think radio and then TV became the great equalizer -- setting a standard for the language. I'm surprised that's not the case in Japan (@show-Zi) and Spain and other places -- unless there is separate TV and radio for different parts of the country.
 

Nightwalker

Level 20
Verified
Trusted
Content Creator
I am a native Brazilian Portuguese speaker; for me English, Italian and Korean languages sounds really nice.

Oddly I dont like Spanish and French too much, they sounds obnoxious, uncanny valley at its finest.


Ps 1: Portuguese and Spanish are very similar, brazilians like to joke that when they travel to the rest of the South America they dont need to speak Spanish, Portonhol is the answer.

Ps 2: European Portuguese sounds very funny to a brazilian.

Personally I think English, Brazilian Portuguese and Japanese are the best languages for music:
 
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bribon77

Level 33
Verified
In the US, there are definitely accents. There is a pronounced Southern accent. Small towns in the Appalachian mountains have what I'd call a 'hick accent.' There is certainly some inner-large-city English that is different. The Northern Central US has a more drawn out style of English.

I guess there was a time.... maybe 80 years ago and further where people literally could not understand each other from different parts of the country. But I think radio and then TV became the great equalizer -- setting a standard for the language. I'm surprised that's not the case in Japan (@show-Zi) and Spain and other places -- unless there is separate TV and radio for different parts of the country.
In Europe there were kingdoms, each kingdom had its language and so far it is preserved, which does not imply that in the schools of Spain, according to the region in which Spanish is taught as the first language and the second of its region, but between the Autoctonos speak their dialect among themselves.

For example, Galicians are a kind of Portuguese. because it borders Portugal, which in the end was the same and so it is in Europe.

With the Basque something similar happens are the Basques of the part of Spain and the French Basques.

In the United States it is different, the official language is spoken and taught the language left by its colonizers. In the US case, English.
 
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blackice

Level 27
Verified
Japanese has completely different expressions and pronunciation depending on the region. The narration in this video sounds French, but it's Southern Japan. I can't understand without subtitles.



When learning Japanese, the word 'standard language' which has been passed down to the national standard is used. If you use this, your will will will be conveyed to the other party. However, if you use it in the countryside of a local city, even if your words are conveyed to the other person, depending on the words the other person speaks, you may need to translate Japanese into Japanese.:geek:
My Sensei was from Tokyo, but my mentor was from Akita. I never learned good regional dialects. But I got around when I was there.

@show-Zi also, isn’t that why tv interviews on the news are subtitled?
 
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show-Zi

Level 26
Verified
My Sensei was from Tokyo, but my mentor was from Akita. I never learned good regional dialects. But I got around when I was there.

@show-Zi also, isn’t that why tv interviews on the news are subtitled?

Originally, it was a production that expressed a conversation with subtitles in a comedy program. I guess it is influenced by manga. Over time, the advantage of being able to confirm the words they missed spread, and comments are now subtitled even on news programs.
 
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