Q&A What Streaming Service Do You Use?

Nevi

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Tidal hi-fi, Spotify premium to when I fart around with earphones. I also watch many videos on YouTube. These days alot of it is in a really good quality. I wait impatiently on Qobuzz as I also live in Denmark. :)
 

LASER_oneXM

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been using Spotify for some years... ...but they been offering 320kb/s only. After lossless/CD audio (*.flac/*.wav) came up and was available for streaming, i switched to Deezer.
 
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Nevi

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Apr 7, 2016
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been using Spotify for some years... ...but they been offering 320kb/s only. After lossless/CD audio (*.flac/*.wav) came up and was available for streaming, i switched to Deezer.
There are good news. Tidal normal premium, is now lossless, and cost only $9.99 USD a month with standard sound quality (1411 Kbps).
I have just downgraded my account. "Hifi plus". I don't care about MQA and atmos and whatever. So now lossless cost the same as Spotify. Spotify
will also start lossless sometime in 2022. So good news for us music freaks. 👍
But if you prefer Deezer fine.
 

LASER_oneXM

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^^^yes, indeed these are good news (y)

I grew up with music in CD quality (1411 kbps)... ...and i never really liked this IMO quite 'low' bitrate of 320 kbs that streaming sites have been offering for music in the past years. So i was very happy to see that now you can enjoy music in (true/old style/'classic') CD quality or above. There is also Hi-Res audio (higher sampling rate) but currently i dont have any compatible hardware for this quality.



In its simplest terms, hi-res audio tends to refer to music files that have a higher sampling frequency and/or bit depth than CD, which is specified at 16-bit/44.1kHz.

Sampling frequency (or sample rate) refers to the number of times samples of the signal are taken per second during the analogue-to-digital conversion process. The more bits there are, the more accurately the signal can be measured in the first instance, so going 16bit to 24bit can deliver a noticeable leap in quality. Hi-res audio files usually use a sampling frequency of 96kHz or 192kHz at 24bit. You can also have 88.2kHz and 176.4kHz files too.

Hi-res audio does come with a downside though: file size. A hi-res file can typically be tens of megabytes in size, and a few tracks can quickly eat up the storage on your device or be cumbersome to stream over your wi-fi or mobile network. Thankfully, storage is much cheaper than it used to be, so it's easier to get higher-capacity devices. And technologies such as MQA (see below) have arrived to help tackle that.
 
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Digmor Crusher

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None. Downloaded all I could years ago, then digitized all my old CD's and albums, everything on my computer now, have all I need. Haven't listened to any "new" music in 15 years.
 

Nevi

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Apr 7, 2016
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^^^yes, indeed these are good news (y)

I grew up with music in CD quality (1411 kbps)... ...and i never really liked this IMO quite 'low' bitrate of 320 kbs that streaming sites have been offering for music in the past years. So i was very happy to see that now you can enjoy music in (true/old style/'classic') CD quality or above. There is also Hi-Res audio (higher sampling rate) but currently i dont have any compatible hardware for this quality.



I admit I can't really hear the difference on so called MQA files, and lossless. So no need to throw pearls for swines. 😂
I'm fine as long I can hear the music in CD quality. It has maybe something to do with my age, high tones and all that. 🙄
 

LASER_oneXM

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two quite 'fresh' reviews of losssless streaming services (from Nov 18, 2021 and from July 17, 2021):



 
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