Serious Discussion Why Choose Ubuntu Linux over Windows 11 Pro Today?

Victor M

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Stronger Permission System: Linux enforces stricter user permissions and access controls, making it more difficult for malware to gain unauthorized access or cause widespread damage.
Linux generally has a smaller attack surface due to its modular design Linux allows users to install only the necessary components and software packages. This minimizes the number of active services, libraries, and drivers, reducing potential entry points for attackers. In contrast, Windows often comes bundled with numerous pre-installed features, some of which may be unused and vulnerable. In particular, Windows 11 Pro comes with a lot of legacy technologies to remain compatible with software built for OS of distant past like Windows XP. Legacy means it is unchanged with the same vulnerabilities as before.

Snap packages are containerized applications that run in their own isolated environment. They come with pre-defined security policies that restrict their access to the rest of the system. For example, Firefox, the default browser comes as a snap. Edge on the other hand, is not compartmentalized. Chromium also comes in a snap package.

AppArmor is a mandatory access control (MAC) system that confines individual programs to a limited set of resources. It is enabled by default on Ubuntu. You can restrict any program to the directories it can access, the code libraries it can access, and devices it can access. The DLL side loading attack is mitigated. But it requires configuration. But configuration is easy, and we all do configuration for security matters here at MT.

Windows also comes fixed with a set of services which you cannot un-install, can not further protect. Ubuntu on the other hand uses systemd service manager which was designed with options which allows administrators to restrict access to the system like kernel modules, kernel options, home directories and devices. Reducing services minimizes attack surface. Service constriction further limits attack vectors.

Ease of use and familiarity argument. Ubuntu COPIES the common UI features of Windows. For everyday general use, the effects of lack of familiarity is minimal. The menu items like Cut, Copy and Paste are the same on both sides. There is still a start menu and all apps menu.

The common perception that Linux is primarily command line is no longer valid. There is no daily usage things in Ubuntu that solely Requires you to use the command line. You do not need to know that ls means dir, there is a File Manager. The common commands like netstat, and ping are available on both. The command line argument is negated because we already know the commonly used commands on both sides. You can cite the Linux command chmod as a security command that needs to learned, but you can change that with File Manager and you don’t need to learn that. You can cite the Linux command chown which changes the owner of a file, but in Windows we have a similar command takeown. Small differences like that can be easily learned because it is not a radically alien concept. And that about sums up all the commands I frequently use to configure security.

The ease of use argument is also used because some familiar applications are not available in Ubuntu. But are we born to know how to use VLC. We learned that. And features are Copied from one app to another, like how all browsers now have tabs. Not to mention that VLC is also available in Ubuntu. Developers borrow features from Windows apps. The thing to consider is what broad class of app is entirely not available to Ubuntu – not many. And there are new features and new benefits which comes with each app that will make sense to adapt. We try out new things to find better ones don’t we?

Having competition and lots of choices only matters sometimes, when there are lots of cost required to mitigate inherent, difficult, accumulated flaws. But when the flaws are gone, the cost are gone too, then having many products and solutions don't matter. The remaining few security flaws are covered the open source way. The security foundation matters a lot. You shouldn't have to pay.

The security benefits are Many, and it requires little effort to migrate. Plus, security costs nothing in Ubuntu, imagine, no more yearly subscriptions to AV's.

I don't have a favorite OS. Changing OS may seem like a big deal. One has to consider addressing the root cause, the efficiency of the solution of the ongoing cost year after year even if you are a home user. And one has to weigh the sustainability of not having a long term solution - zero days will continuously appear - more so for Windows.
 
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Bot

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You've made some great points! The enhanced security features, modular design, and strict user permissions in Ubuntu certainly make it an appealing choice over Windows 11 Pro. The containment of applications through snap packages and the AppArmor control system further enhance its security.

The argument about ease of use and familiarity is also valid. Ubuntu has evolved to be much more user-friendly and the perception that it's solely command-line based is outdated. The adaptation of common UI features and the availability of common applications, like VLC, make the transition easier for Windows users.

Indeed, while there may be a learning curve with Ubuntu, the numerous security benefits and the ability to customize and control the system to a greater extent can make it worthwhile. Thanks for your detailed comparison!
 
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Andy Ful

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There are cons and pros:

 
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Antimalware18

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Give it a shot, I completely gave up windows for a little over a year and ran purly Kubuntu, Its fun if you like learning about multiple OS's and how they work. It can most definately
be a pain at first if all you've ever ran is windows.
 

Victor M

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There are a few points that I missed.

a. Learning Ubuntu does require a little bit of learning, adjusting. Practical Repsonse pointed this out.Linux runs the entire internet, it's versatile, customizable , one can find many career opportunities upon learning . It is not just saving money, you actually MAKE MONEY from this learning.

b. The dissatisfaction points raised in The Year of the Linux dissatisfaction is due to his wrong business target scope. He is a developer. And he therefore finds inconsistencies among distros not fulfilling his business dreams of write once, profit everywhere. If he were to focus on only one or a few distros, his dissatisfaction and counter arguments would be gone. He should focus on one or a few disros and do them well. That is a basic concept in business. He also assumes certain things are common requirements to all home users, like CIFS and media playback. Well, the need for CIFS/SMB is not absolute, because if there is only one main system, there is no need to intercommunicate between OSes. Media playback capability is good to have in the old days, but Spotify offer an undeniable benefit in that you don't need to buy, hunt and build your collection anymore. You have access to hundreds of millions of songs instantly, multinational even. It is an out-dated requirement.

c. If games are important to you, know that Steam and UnReal is available to Ubuntu. There is a move towards developing one common engine that works across Linux and Windows. Profit motive, cost optimization and the need to increase market share drives this and more will follow.

d. There should exist a strong security solution somewhere on the market. But, you have to hunt, shop around and test them out. How much more time do you want to waste? Strong security is already built in on Ubuntu.

e. Microsoft is well known for designing Windows to emphasize convenience.. But that doesn't mean they are alone in aiming for convenience or that they excel in it. All OS have this common goal,

d. With Windows, you have to do add-on security. MS intended it this way because it wants to tempts businesses to participate. They realize that it is a way to gain market share. It creates an illusion of choice for consumers. They SELL development kits. It is a major source of income. Realize that this whole add-on security situation only benefits MS, it does not benefit you. You have to think as selfishly as them, move to a platform that benefits you.

f. MS intentionally and knowingly don't address security to allow businesses to sell solutions. That's part of the deal. They don't care if it creates a huge security problem world wide. This move towards providing security patches is only a response to market conditions. It doesn't prove that they aim for security. They don't move unless they are compelled to. .A recent example, they don't even provide security logging in Azure until the government complained heavily. Their recent announcement of this big security push is also a reaction to huge government pressure. They are an absolute business bastard.
 
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CyberDevil

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I know Linux at the directory switching level and Curl is all I need as a developer. Okay, I can also run Docker and a container in it. But I won't gain any useful knowledge for my career by installing that on my home computer. Moreover, advanced Linux knowledge is mostly needed by Dev Ops specialists and system administrators - it's a huge knowledge stack beyond Linux itself, and Linux alone won't make your career.

Linux is not synonymous with security. Vulnerabilities are published and found all the time. Repository maintainers are obscure random people that no one controls. It's all a big pandora's box where you never know what might be inside.

Microsoft doesn't develop with convenience in mind - okay, I'll just install replacements for Start and Exlporer, which I like. What about Linux? Alas, I don't know of any distro that I will be comfortable with out of the box either. I'll definitely also be installing my own software and customizing, or replacing the UI altogether.

A huge number of games don't work on Linux because anti-chit systems don't and never will support Wine. If a person cares about games, it makes no sense for them to limit the list of games available to them by choosing Linux over Windows.

I don't think Windows doesn't care about security. Most of the community here uses Defender and are completely happy with the security it offers. A little customization and it's very secure, and you can't go anywhere without customization, especially not in Linux.

I only plan on switching to Linux when I retire and buy a new PlayStation. =)

That's a different perspective.
 
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ForgottenSeer 109138

I know Linux at the directory switching level and Curl is all I need as a developer. Okay, I can also run Docker and a container in it. But I won't gain any useful knowledge for my career by installing that on my home computer. Moreover, advanced Linux knowledge is mostly needed by Dev Ops specialists and system administrators - it's a huge knowledge stack beyond Linux itself, and Linux alone won't make your career.

Linux is not synonymous with security. Vulnerabilities are published and found all the time. Repository maintainers are obscure random people that no one controls. It's all a big pandora's box where you never know what might be inside.

Microsoft doesn't develop with convenience in mind - okay, I'll just install replacements for Start and Exlporer, which I like. What about Linux? Alas, I don't know of any distro that I will be comfortable with out of the box either. I'll definitely also be installing my own software and customizing, or replacing the UI altogether.

A huge number of games don't work on Linux because anti-chit systems don't and never will support Wine. If a person cares about games, it makes no sense for them to limit the list of games available to them by choosing Linux over Windows.

I don't think Windows doesn't care about security. Most of the community here uses Defender and are completely happy with the security it offers. A little customization and it's very secure, and you can't go anywhere without customization, especially not in Linux.

I only plan on switching to Linux when I retire and buy a new PlayStation. =)

That's a different perspective.
Both operating systems have vulnerabilities, but Windows' larger user base makes it a more attractive target for attackers. By default, Linux systems are not explicitly hardened for maximum security. Linux prioritizes flexibility and customization. This means it's generally up to the administrator to implement security best practices. By default, Windows prioritizes usability and convenience over maximum security. This makes it easier for everyday users to navigate the operating system, but it also creates a larger attack surface for potential hackers. Hardening is essential for shoring up security on both Windows and Linux systems.

Linux plays a critical role in infrastructure, web services, and mobile devices. Linux proficiency teaches valuable skills that go beyond the operating system itself. One can learn problem-solving, troubleshooting, and working with the command line, which are useful across many tech fields.
 

Victor M

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A huge number of games don't work on Linux because anti-chit systems don't and never will support Wine
I already said game vendors are making their games cross platform by developing a common engine. Wine is no longer a limitation.
I don't think Windows doesn't care about security. Most of the community here uses Defender and are completely happy with the security it offers
My point is MS only started to care about security when they are forced to, as illustrated by their choice of not offering something as basic as security logging to Azure customers. Only when the government suffered a series of breaches and thus raised their voice, giving MS pressure, did MS take action.And is solely about cost and expenditure. Their only demonstrate they care about security when forced to by client complains.
 

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