HarborFront

Level 53
Verified
Content Creator
It's a big step toward greater accessibility for PCs.

It's not easy to use a PC if you have ALS or another neuromuscular disease that prevents you from using your hands. You can use eye tracking, but that could easily entail specialized software and an imperfect experience. Microsoft thinks it can do better. It's adding built-in eye tracking to Windows 10, nicknamed Eye Control, that will let anyone navigate using their gaze. You can launch apps, type and otherwise perform common tasks just by focusing your eyes on the right part of the screen.

Microsoft partnered with Tobii on Eye Control, and it won't surprise you to hear that Tobii's trackers have the broadest compatibility with the new feature. The upgrade is available in beta as part of a Windows Insider preview if you're eager to try it right away, although there's no firm timetable for when it'll reach stable Windows versions.

The addition represents the next big step in making PCs truly accessible. Both Apple and Microsoft have accessibility features, but they're usually focused on vision and hearing issues. This opens the door to people who need an entirely different control scheme. Don't be surprised if you see eye tracking interfaces (and eventually, other interfaces) come to other platforms and mobile devices.

Windows 10 will soon include built-in eye tracking

For more details read here

From Hack to Product, Microsoft Empowers People with Eye Control for Windows 10
 

DeepWeb

Level 25
Verified
Hmmmm........

first I got rid of the mouse......

now using touchscreen.....

and coming soon will be using my eyes to control the screen......

This is call PROGRESS! Not bad, huh?

:D

up next will be probably using brainwaves...

:rolleyes:
Doesn't matter. They are already tracking your cursor movements anyway. That's the price we pay for the "free" upgrade. Was always too good to be true. :)
 

Fritz

Level 11
The addition represents the next big step in making PCs truly accessible.
Truly accessible for monetization that is. If they cared for disabled people they'd make it optionally available during setup.

Dear Microsoft, can you please make up your mind how you intend to let us pay for your software? I mean it's either money or data, you're not getting both. Not from this user that is. Sometimes I wonder how stupid they think we really are when I read how gracefully they explain their invasions.
 

jamescv7

Level 85
Verified
Trusted
Let's look at it on a positive side, the number of people with disabilities regardless in what condition have already engaged in computers and smartphones; they have the right to use the product; so of course accessibility features must be improve from time to time.

Now when it comes on the revenues well I do hope it should be properly implemented and goes on the right cause, the problem here is when money may affect the overall performance of certain product.
 

Fritz

Level 11
Of course, if it were for people with disabilities they'd ask during setup if it's needed and also allow it to be turned on at a later point in time. Which, considering the amount of not-disabled vs. disabled folks, is perfectly logical. The chance of me being Stephen Hawking is just a tad more remote than me being somebody else.

No, this is clearly being made with a monetization agenda in mind. And don't get me wrong, I need to eat, too. I'd be perfectly fine if they said it like it is instead of going for a Salvation Army medal. That's just hideous.

This is a thing they could have done with Windows 10S, e.g.: "Look, we're gonna watch your every move BUT this stuff is FREE! Awesome, right?"

Again, helping disabled people by offering optional solutions is fine, syphoning stuff off everybody and their mothers by default is something else.
 
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