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jamescv7

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Actually the problematic installing updates, tends to be numerous reasons; it might be the corrupted Windows Update or the patch itself; its hard to say since it binds to the OS on any issues may arise cause others may work well and few didn't.
 

Petrovic

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Over the years Microsoft has managed to break computers with updates, though not intentionally of course. However, it's generally wise to wait just a bit after Patch Tuesday and keep an eye out for reports of any problems that other customers are experiencing. It's generally safe, but you can never be too cautious.

Now those who have stayed behind, clinging to Windows 7, seem to be on the receiving end of just such an incident. If users of the TechNet forums are to be believed, and there's no reason to suspect otherwise, then KB3033929 could wreak a bit of havoc with Windows 7 systems.

The message boards have lit up with pleas to the company -- "Security Update for Windows 7 for x64-based Systems (KB3033929). Installation date: ‎3/‎11/‎2015 8:57 AM. Installation status: Failed. Error details: Code 80004005. Update type: Important. A security update. . . I can't find any info on this error. Tried the update twice and both times it failed".

Others chimed in stating similar issues, and other tech help forums have followed suit. "Failed for me too on a Dell Optiplex 790 with Windows 7 Pro SP1 64-bit", and the like. Various fixes have been suggested, but were met with responses like "I tried to manually install with the link of Carey Frisch, it didn't work. I'm always stuck on 72 percent".

This seems to be only causing problems for 64 bit users, though that's likely a fair amount these days. This appears to be only some users, so it is possibly based on software and configuration. There has been no word from Microsoft as of yet, but we'll update you if something comes along.
 
D

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I never update my sys so I never have to worry about faulty update
You should always keep your system updated; security patches are there for a reason. Nonetheless, you're also missing out on any improvements by Microsoft, released for the OS.

But yes, I guess the advantage is you never end up with a bad update which causes havoc...

Cheers. ;)
 
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Oxygen

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I never update my sys so I never have to worry about faulty update
I have been siting here for minutes thinking as why this is one of the worst mistakes anyone could possibly make. It's so easy to make a backup of the system regularly, and it very fast to restore to a previous point.

So you're telling me that you never update because of faulty updates which are in some cases rare? If you do happen to receive a faulty update, I'm pretty sure you will see information online giving detailed information on the update(s) that caused the issue in the first place.

I can't believe you would go through so much trouble not updating the system (which is not smart at all) when you can simply revert all changes with backups if you made any.


I feel the need to correct people if they're doing the wrong thing, sorry that's just how I have became lately. Feel free to continue to do what it is you do with not updating, but I'm just stating a more efficient way of doing things.
 
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D

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I have been siting here for minutes thinking as why this is one of the worst mistakes anyone could possibly make. It's so easy to make a backup of the system regularly, and it very fast to restore to a previous point.

So you're telling me that you never update because of faulty updates which are in some cases rare? If you do happen to receive a faulty update, I'm pretty sure you will see information online giving detailed information on the update(s) that caused the issue in the first place.

I can't believe you would go through so much trouble not updating the system (which is not smart at all) when you can simply revert all changes with backups if you made any.


I feel the need to correct people if they're doing the wrong thing, sorry that's just how I have became lately. Feel free to continue to do what it is you do with not updating, but I'm just stating a more smart way of dealing with these faulty updates.
I've got to agree with Fedora.

@nissimezra, Antivirus software doesn't always do the job. If there is an exploit which allowed a malware writer to launch a program with administrative rights (giving more control of your system (to what it can do) if UAC is enabled) and your system is not updated and is missing out on the latest security update from Microsoft which patches this all up, then you may be in some bad luck one day. (For the record, this sort of thing has occurred in the past).

It's like Antivirus software. If a malware writer creates an exploit for it (as an example), what will the vendor do? They will release a update, patching it up (if possible - it won't hurt for them to try and patch it up...). - just so you know, the exploit would be related to the drivers of the Antivirus software, and as a result of the exploit a BSOD would occur. (in this example, instance).

You may have never been infected before, however that's not to say you won't be in the future. Keeping your system updated with the latest Microsoft security updates is a start to preventing it.

Cheers. ;)
 

Oxygen

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I've got to agree with Fedora.

@nissimezra, Antivirus software doesn't always do the job. If there is an exploit which allowed a malware writer to launch a program with administrative rights (giving more control of your system (to what it can do) if UAC is enabled) and your system is not updated and is missing out on the latest security update from Microsoft which patches this all up, then you may be in some bad luck one day. (For the record, this sort of thing has occurred in the past).

It's like Antivirus software. If a malware writer creates an exploit for it (as an example), what will the vendor do? They will release a update, patching it up (if possible - it won't hurt for them to try and patch it up...). - just so you know, the exploit would be related to the drivers of the Antivirus software, and as a result of the exploit a BSOD would occur. (in this example, instance).

You may have never been infected before, however that's not to say you won't be in the future. Keeping your system updated with the latest Microsoft security updates is a start to preventing it.

Cheers. ;)
Very good explanation as to why to keep your system updated. All of your posts seem to always provide a in-depth explanation and reason as to why one would want to do this or that.


Sorry if you don't understand the last part -- I haven't had any sleep yet so far, but I do think you will understand what I'm talking about if you think about it for a second.
 

nissimezra

New Member
You should always keep your system updated; security patches are there for a reason.
;)
Said who? MS? sure they want you to believe that it's a high risk and very DANGEROUS not to update, do you know why?
Money. if you won't be afraid you won't buy. I know many XP users that want to stay with XP but have a fear that its dangerous when it's not that bad.
I worked on an IT for a year and you won't believe how many problem updates can do. and it slow the pc when installing. I uselessly update once when install and done for at least a year

cheers
 
D

Deleted member 21043

Said who? MS? sure they want you to believe that it's a high risk and very DANGEROUS not to update, do you know why?
Money. if you won't be afraid you won't buy. I know many XP users that want to stay with XP but have a fear that its dangerous when it's not that bad.
No, security patches are not released for making money.

Security patches are released to patch vulnerabilities in the OS and/or other things which can affect the security of the OS/user. This includes the example from my previous post about a program executing with administrative rights without the user being aware or prompted with "consent.exe"/UAC alert even when UAC is enabled. As I mentioned, this has happened before. As a result, Microsoft released a security patch, patching this up and preventing users who have updated to the latest security patch protected from samples which try to do this.

The updates are free. If the user purchases the OS (e.g. Windows 7) they won't need to pay for the updates...

As for Windows XP, It's a good OS in my opinion. Microsoft wanted people to move onto the latest things they develop (it's possible this would be related to money), however they managed to move a lot of people over through ending support. Ending support meant an end to security patches - they no longer wanted to spend time working on a OS which was too old when they could use their time with the "newer" products.

I worked on an IT for a year and you won't believe how many problem updates can do. and it slow the pc when installing. I uselessly update once when install and done for at least a year
Updates can cause a problem sometimes. We can take an example from this thread. However, fixes are released. This doesn't mean you shouldn't update. If someone really did not want to encounter such an issue when updating, they could wait maybe a few days before updating and check for any reports online about the update. This means, they get a updated system but avoid faulty updates. Make sure you always have a backup of your important documents, and it will save you stress when there is a updating issue.

If you have a dual-booted system with another Operating System such as: Windows 8 (whilst having 7 installed), you could also use the dual-booted OS whilst you wait for a fix for the Windows 7 system after a faulty update. Whilst booted into the secondary OS, you could actually retrieve your data from the OS which had the faulty update preventing it from booting by going into that drive through the Windows Explorer, into your profile (if you have the correct permissions) and copying the data over to an external device (such as a USB) or over to the partition with the secondary OS installed (for example, Windows 8).

Cheers. ;)
 
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