Android sends 20x more data to Google than iOS sends to Apple, study says

pablozi

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Whether you have an iPhone or an Android device, it’s continuously sending data including your location, phone number, and local network details to Apple or Google. Now, a researcher has provided a side-by-side comparison that suggests that, while both iOS and Android collect handset data around the clock—even when devices are idle, just out of the box, or after users have opted out—the Google mobile OS collects about 20 times as much data than its Apple competitor.

Both iOS and Android, researcher Douglas Leith from Trinity College in Ireland said, transmit telemetry data to their motherships even when a user hasn’t logged in or has explicitly configured privacy settings to opt out of such collection. Both OSes also send data to Apple and Google when a user does simple things such as inserting a SIM card or browsing the handset settings screen. Even when idle, each device connects to its back-end server on average every 4.5 minutes.
 

Marko :)

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Another class action suit on Google would be nice since it's already facing one on its Incognito Mode for desktop browser regarding privacy issues
The one regarding incognito windows could easily fail. I mean, when you open it, message clearly says that it doesn't hide your activity from the websites you visit.

Screenshot_1.png


Also, Firefox, Edge, Opera and other browsers have exactly the same message and I'm not seeing them sued. So...
 
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Raiden

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The one regarding incognito windows could easily fail. I mean, when you open it, message clearly says that it doesn't hide your activity from the websites you visit.

View attachment 256191

Also, Firefox, Edge, Opera and other browsers have exactly the same message and I'm not seeing them sued. So...
Maybe....however I don't think it will fail that easily for a couple of reasons IMHO.

First, while it is true that all of the various browsers have the same messaging in their incognito tabs, it's actually not there to protect them from the type of lawsuit that Google is facing IMO. It's there to protect them from users who falsely think that an incognito tab is like a VPN, which we all know it's not. An incognito tab just stops people viewing your browsing history locally on the actual computer, however your employer, ISP can still see your browsing history.

Secondly, Google is neither a school, ISP, or even an employer for the vast majority of people using their browser. Unless you work at Google, or visit a site owened and maintained my Google(ie: Gmail), then Google can't really hide behind that criteria outlined in their incognito tab.

So I think Google will still have a very difficult time fighting this one off. Atleast that's my take on the matter.
 
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Marko :)

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Maybe....however I don't think it will fail that easily for a couple of reasons IMHO.

First, while it is true that all of the various browsers have the same messaging in their incognito tabs, it's actually not there to protect them from the type of lawsuit that Google is facing IMO. It's there to protect them from users who falsely think that an incognito tab is like a VPN, which we all know it's not. An incognito tab just stops people viewing your browsing history locally on the actual computer, however your employer, ISP can still see your browsing history.

Secondly, Google is neither a school, ISP, or even an employer for the vast majority of people using their browser. Unless you work at Google, or visit a site owened and maintained my Google(ie: Gmail), then Google can't really hide behind that criteria outlined in their incognito tab.

So I think Google will still have a very difficult time fighting this one off. Atleast that's my take on the matter.
Imagine you're signing contract with some ISP for their "unlimited internet" service. There are three full pages of text which you never read because you don't have time to waste and instead just signed, that's it. After work, you come home and start downloading bunch of stuff when suddenly your speed drops to unusable level.

After spending hours on phone with the customer service, you learn that there is fair use limit which you surpassed and that you'll have to enjoy slow internet until the end of the month. Not to mention, all of that was written in three pages you didn't read.

Would you sue ISP in that case? I don't think you would. Because, it's clearly your fault you didn't read fine print or informed yourself about the service before signing that contract.

Same can be applied here. Google warned you every time you have opened incognito windows, again and again and again. It's also on very visible place, white text on dark background with normal font size. It wasn't written in million page document and you just had to read that few words. Is that so hard?

Because of that, I think judge will dismiss the case.

Don't get me wrong, I'm pro-privacy and I'm really agains any data collection. But, I have to say—Google did nothing wrong here.
 
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Raiden

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Imagine you're signing contract with some ISP for their "unlimited internet" service. There are three full pages of text which you never read because you don't have time to waste and instead just sign, that's it. After work, you come home and start downloading bunch of stuff when suddenly your speed drops to unusable level.

After spending hours on phone with the customer service, you learn that there is fair use limit which you surpassed and that you'll have to enjoy slow internet until the end of the month. Not to mention, all of that was written in three pages you didn't read.

Would you sue ISP in that case? I don't think you would. Because, it's clearly your fault you didn't read fine print or informed yourself about the service before signing that contract.

Same can be applied here. Google warned you every time you have opened incognito windows again and again and again. It was also presented to be very visible, white text on dark background with normal font size. It also wasn't written in million pages document and you only just had to read that few words. Is that so hard?
That is true! I do agree that alot of people never take the time to fully read what they are signing/signing up for.

For the record I never said it won't be dismissed, but there is an issue in the wording. As written it is a little vague and to be fair, it does state "might be viable to: your employer, ISP and websites you visit." It doesn't say will be visable to Google. Following their statement.... If you visit Microsoft's website for example using incognito, technically only your ISP, Microsoft and assuming you are visiting while at work, your employer may see that you visted Microsoft's site.

That's were I see the argument will be....question is can Google claim to be an employer ISP, or website when one doesn't work for them and is visiting a site that Google doesn't own. Obviously I'm ignoring Google analytics that many sites use, so it remains to be seen if that is their out. However in saying that...im sure Google will be careful how much they push back. If Google analytics gets pulled into this, it may be a bigger issue for Google than just stopping receiving data from users when using incognito.

It's a lot of grey and IMHO, while Google may get off the hook, they still will have to somehow explain/prove they meet this criteria.

Atleast that's my take.
 
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Marko :)

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That is true! I do agree that alot of people never take the time to fully read what they are signing/signing up for.

For the record I never said it won't be dismissed, but there is an issue in the wording. As written it is a little vague and to be fair, it does state "might be viable to: your employer, ISP and websites you visit." It doesn't say will be visable to Google. Following their statement.... If you visit Microsoft's website for example using incognito, technically only your ISP, Microsoft and assuming you are visiting while at work, your employer may see that you visted Microsoft's site.

That's were I see the argument will be....question is can Google claim to be an employer ISP, or website when one doesn't work for them and is visiting a site that Google doesn't own. Obviously I'm ignoring Google analytics that many sites use, so it remains to be seen if that is their out. However in saying that...im sure Google will be careful how much they push back. If Google analytics gets pulled into this, it may be a bigger issue for Google than just stopping receiving data from users when using incognito.

It's a lot of grey and IMHO, while Google may get off the hook, they still will have to somehow explain/prove they meet this criteria.

Atleast that's my take.
If thinking about Chrome sending every visited URL to Google, this isn't the case. Not in normal mode, not in incognito window. I actually tested Chrome to see if anything would come up, but nothing did.

Though, there are features in Chrome that send URLs to Google (like enhanced Safe Browsing) or what you type (enhanced dictionary), but it's worth to keep in mind that these features are opt-in, which means they are turned off by default.
 
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