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Deleted member 65228

combining with VS is kind of cheating tho, when VS alone will handle all the threats.
No it won't, but I know what you mean.

VoodooShield is an anti-executable, it won't stop file-less exploit attacks which you could expect during a targeted attack from a well-funded and resourced actor - it might stop the payload if the payload is crap but this depends on the payload and the VoodooShield configuration, and that isn't preventing the actual exploitation phase. There has also been a rise in exploit kit deployment lately by actors who are spreading ransomware and banking malware - and not surprisingly abusing vulnerabilities in Microsoft Office, Adobe products and others in the exploit kits -, which is affecting average, novice Home users.

Spectre being exploited from the web-browser via JavaScript (yes, this is possible). VoodooShield won't prevent that for example, and thus unless you're using a feature like Site Isolation on Google Chrome (or equivalent on another web-browser), sensitive data stored in-memory which is unrelated to the web-page content responsible for introducing the malicious script which is performing the Spectre exploitation can become exposed to the attacker. Another example would be exploitation of the V8 engine in a Chromium-based browser, something that was also recently done.

Don't get me started on vulnerabilities in Microsoft Edge, Google are constantly disclosing Microsoft Edge vulnerabilities through their Project Zero team. There's been a phenomenal amount of Microsoft Edge vulnerability disclosures over the past few months, and as far as I know, most of which are patched after the time-frame between privately reporting to Microsoft and public disclosure (which is at-least a 90-day window for a malicious actor to find the vulnerability themselves and exploit it, and some time after public disclosure in case they weren't already aware, which can be anything from 1 to 5+ months).

Microsoft Office is constantly a target to the point that I do not even recommend people use it unless they really need to. Adobe Flash has always been a vulnerable little bugger, it's also constantly attacked. Java is also a big target, but the exploitation attacks have lowered down over time compared to Microsoft Office and Adobe Flash as far as I know.

Therefore, using an anti-executable solution alongside a reputable, well-made security solution which are both compatible with each other makes perfect sense to me. One solution will cover some areas and the other solution will cover other areas, it can work well depending on what type of user you are and your habits.

Moving on to mention network security, that part is mandatory really unless you want to be vulnerable to data ex-filtration. Even if you become compromised, you still have a game at preventing damage caused by the payloads present on the environment... The last thing you want is for your sensitive and personal data to be ex-filtrated back to an attacker's server. Network security will be the key to mitigating the damage of data ex-filtration attempts, so even if you use exploit mitigation and traditional Anti-Virus techniques with an anti-executable, network security is still important.

At the end of the day, there's nothing you can do to make yourself invincible. You can have all the money and technology in the world but you'll always be vulnerable one way or another. You can only put a determined hacker "off-guard" and swing them in the wrong direction (or try and identify who they are and take action prior to them being successful with their attack/s). There is NO silver bullet, that is just how it is... and it will be for the foreseeable future.

Use whatever meets your requirements/you are comfortable with and like using.
 
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Deleted member 65228

I believe one should try multiple products instead of relying on such tests. Av-test.org for example had given Eset a 3.5 rating in performance section. For me Eset is one of the lightest product out there. So my point is that one should test a product himself.
Most security solutions will offer a 30-day trial.

People should take advantage of these 30-day trials to discover which security solution they trust and feel comfortable with using.
 

Slyguy

Level 43
At the end of the day, there's nothing you can do to make yourself invincible. You can have all the money and technology in the world but you'll always be vulnerable one way or another. You can only put a determined hacker "off-guard" and swing them in the wrong direction (or try and identify who they are and take action prior to them being successful with their attack/s). There is NO silver bullet, that is just how it is... and it will be for the foreseeable future.
True words. To become invincible you'll be going back to sign language and pads of paper. Sad fact.

I'll have a Sandstorm Unit on my network in a few weeks compliments of Sophos. No illusion that'll be bulletproof, but that's two sandboxes evaluating inbound files which could prove interesting.

But even then, I have no illusions of 100% security. Good, well funded hackers are persistent and patient at the same time and will wait for your mistake, wait for a particular exploit, wait for you to become lazy and presto, they're in the door.