Serious Discussion Everything about Windows 12 - Release date and Rumors

Ink

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I truly hate the appearance of Windows 11 and the latest Gnome. Both are trying to replicate OS for a mobile and touch devices.
Microsoft heavily focused on touch back in 2012 with the launch of Windows 8 and Windows RT.

Today’s Windows 10 and 11 are hardly replicating mobile touch devices. Modern? Yes. Mobile? No.

Mobile is the future? Yes. Should Microsoft adapt Windows for the future? Yes.
 

Divine_Barakah

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Microsoft heavily focused on touch back in 2012 with the launch of Windows 8 and Windows RT.

Today’s Windows 10 and 11 are hardly replicating mobile touch devices. Modern? Yes. Mobile? No.

Mobile is the future? Yes. Should Microsoft adapt Windows for the future? Yes.
They should develop a new OS for the future, and leave Windows without messing it up.

The start menu, the notification centre and almost all Windows app give the impression that the OS is built for touch devices with the appearance of a mobile OS.
 
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silversurfer

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Intel and Microsoft seem to be hinting at Windows 12​

Both Intel and Microsoft seem to be preparing for the as yet unannounced Windows 12. The hardware leaker @leaf_hobby, known for revealing the full specs of Intel’s Xeon chips before launch, has published details about Intel’s Meteor Lake desktop platform. Intel reportedly mentions internally that its next-gen CPUs will support Windows 12.

While the tweet has since been deleted, VideoCardz notes that Meteor Lake is expected to include 20 PCIe Gen5 lanes and support for Windows 12. We asked Intel to comment on the leak, but the company refused. Microsoft also declined to comment on the reports of Intel preparing to support Windows 12.

While Microsoft hasn’t announced any plans for Windows 12, there are already signs the company is looking to future versions of Windows to integrate AI-powered features. “As we start to develop future versions of Windows we’ll think about other places where AI should play a natural role in terms of the experience,” said Yusuf Mehdi, Microsoft’s head of consumer marketing, in an interview with The Verge earlier this week.
 

vtqhtr413

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New features hidden away in an early build of an upcoming Windows 11 update will allow users to configure their own ‘Cloud PC’ – and this could be our clearest hint yet at what Microsoft plans for the future of Windows – such as Windows 12. As Neowin reports, Twitter user Albacore has been digging into Windows 11 Dev build 23419, which is rolling out to people signed up to the Windows Insider program, and is available on the Canary, Dev and Beta channels. In a series of tweets, which you can see below, Albacore noticed that in the Windows 11 ‘Settings’ app, there are now options for how to access a Cloud PC – either via a dedicated app, or straight from the desktop.
 

vtqhtr413

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We may have caught a glimpse of what the Windows 12 desktop could look like, or at least been given a rough idea of how it might eventually turn out. Neowin spotted that an image shown at Ignite 2022, which as we reported at the time was thought to represent the successor to Windows 11 – generally assumed to be Windows 12 (but we certainly don’t know that for sure) – has just turned up again. This is an enhanced version of the original leaked image, and now you can clearly see that it says ‘Next Valley Prototype Design’ at the top, which refers to next-gen Windows. And as you may recall, it shows a very different-looking desktop with a floating taskbar (MacOS Dock-style) that has no system tray.
1680002495316.png
 

silversurfer

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Microsoft plans major platform upgrades for “Windows 12” that will modernize the OS with AI, faster updates, and better security​

What you need to know​

  • Microsoft is once again hard at work on building out a "modern" version of Windows.
  • The project is called CorePC, and follows the same goals as Windows 10X but with native support for legacy apps on devices that require it.
  • CorePC will pave the way to new configurations of Windows that scale up and down depending on PC hardware.
 
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ForgottenSeer 98186

Windows 12 is not a re-write of Windows from the ground up. It is just Windows 11 with a few new layers of eye candy and more social media stuff. Oh, and by the way, that laptop you just bought last year... Windows 12 will not be compatible with the hardware.
 
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Imranmt

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What you need to know​

  • Microsoft is once again hard at work on building out a "modern" version of Windows.
  • The project is called CorePC, and follows the same goals as Windows 10X but with native support for legacy apps on devices that require it.
  • CorePC will pave the way to new configurations of Windows that scale up and down depending on PC hardware.

For many years, Microsoft has been trying to modernize the Windows platform. Its most recent attempt at this was with Windows Core OS, an effort that aimed to deliver a modular, UWP-first OS that stripped the platform of legacy features and app compatibility in favor of being lightweight, quicker to install updates, and much more secure.

Unfortunately, Microsoft was never able to ship a version of Windows Core OS for traditional PC form factors, though it certainly tried. Windows 10X was Microsoft’s last attempt at this, but the project was canceled in 2021 after months of internal testing and years of development on Windows Core OS itself.
Microsoft is essentially tackling its Windows Core OS vision from the other end of the spectrum. If Windows Core OS was an effort to “rebuild” Windows from the ground up as a modern, configurable OS without the overhead of legacy app compatibility, Windows CorePC starts with the full Windows desktop and works backwards to break it down into a modular, configurable system while maintaining native support for legacy apps and workflows where necessary.

My sources tell me CorePC will allow Microsoft to finally deliver a version of Windows that truly competes with Chromebooks in OS footprint, performance, and capabilities. A version of Windows that only runs Edge, web apps, Android apps (via Project Latte) and Office apps, designed for low-end education PCs is already in early testing internally, and is roughly 60-75% smaller than Windows 11 SE.

Microsoft is also working on a version of CorePC that meet the current feature set and capabilities of Windows desktop, but with state separation enabled for those faster OS updates and improved security benefits. The company is working on a compatibility layer codenamed Neon for legacy apps that require a shared state OS to function, too.
 
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ForgottenSeer 98186

  • The project is called CorePC, and follows the same goals as Windows 10X but with native support for legacy apps on devices that require it.
  • CorePC will pave the way to new configurations of Windows that scale up and down depending on PC hardware.

For many years, Microsoft has been trying to modernize the Windows platform. Its most recent attempt at this was with Windows Core OS, an effort that aimed to deliver a modular, UWP-first OS that stripped the platform of legacy features and app compatibility in favor of being lightweight, quicker to install updates, and much more secure.

Unfortunately, Microsoft was never able to ship a version of Windows Core OS for traditional PC form factors, though it certainly tried. Windows 10X was Microsoft’s last attempt at this, but the project was canceled in 2021 after months of internal testing and years of development on Windows Core OS itself.
Microsoft is essentially tackling its Windows Core OS vision from the other end of the spectrum. If Windows Core OS was an effort to “rebuild” Windows from the ground up as a modern, configurable OS without the overhead of legacy app compatibility, Windows CorePC starts with the full Windows desktop and works backwards to break it down into a modular, configurable system while maintaining native support for legacy apps and workflows where necessary.

My sources tell me CorePC will allow Microsoft to finally deliver a version of Windows that truly competes with Chromebooks in OS footprint, performance, and capabilities. A version of Windows that only runs Edge, web apps, Android apps (via Project Latte) and Office apps, designed for low-end education PCs is already in early testing internally, and is roughly 60-75% smaller than Windows 11 SE.

Microsoft is also working on a version of CorePC that meet the current feature set and capabilities of Windows desktop, but with state separation enabled for those faster OS updates and improved security benefits. The company is working on a compatibility layer codenamed Neon for legacy apps that require a shared state OS to function, too.

What is being said indirectly here is that Windows 12 will contain all of the legacy code that has caused so many problems over the decades.

Put lipstick on a cow. It's still a cow.
 

TairikuOkami

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OK, so let me put it like this. I want to disable some vulnerable services and use some reg tweaks ... .
AI: Woah, woah, what do you think, you are doing, you can no do that! I will stop you, for your own good!
 

Zero Knowledge

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M$ has tried this several times and failed. Nothing has worked for them. People would rather buy a Chromebook or iPad than deal with M$.

Office365 has basically killed the need for Windows. You don't need it to run office unless you want it installed.
 
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