Q&A How many times a day you shut down your PC?

mlnevese

Level 23
Verified
May 3, 2015
1,276
I disagree, a mid range gaming PC will use around 300W, so a 550W is more than enough.

For the high-end, 650W is pretty much standard.

The enthusiasts that like to waste money and end up getting PSUs at 800W or higher.

As always PSU brand matters, a cheap PSU at 550W is not the same as a branded PSU at 550W. As already suggested by others here, Seasonic is among the best on the market.

You're obviously mistaken... a true enthusiast needs a nuclear reactor just to turn on the computer :)

I really think it's amazing how many people are willing to spend thousands of dollars on equipment they won't even use on its full potential most of the time :)
 

blackice

Level 32
Verified
Apr 1, 2019
2,179
There is always the consideration you may want headroom for a future upgrade. Say you had a GTX 1060 and now have more spending money and (if you could buy one) wanted a RTX 3080. You’ll need more than a 550W PSU. So, considering potential upgrades is something you may want to do.
 

SecurityNightmares

Level 37
Verified
Jan 9, 2020
2,679
I disagree, a mid range gaming PC will use around 300W, so a 550W is more than enough.

For the high-end, 650W is pretty much standard.

The enthusiasts that like to waste money and end up getting PSUs at 800W or higher.

As always PSU brand matters, a cheap PSU at 550W is not the same as a branded PSU at 550W. As already suggested by others here, Seasonic is among the best on the market.
You should read about voltage peaks. As hardware can boost nowadays, a low PSU will shut down your PC then.
It doesn't depend on premium or not PSU but Watt power. PSU labels are only marketing.
 

Local Host

Level 23
Verified
Sep 26, 2017
1,284
You should read about voltage peaks. As hardware can boost nowadays, a low PSU will shut down your PC then.
It doesn't depend on premium or not PSU but Watt power. PSU labels are only marketing.
No wonder you had issues with your PC turning off at 550W, clearly you had a white brand PSU, which is asking for issues.

I still have a 650W PSU from Seasonic, which is still going strong and I'm currently using a RX 6800 with a R5 3600 at 4.5GHz.

Any proper branded PSU like Seasonic has more than enough headroom for voltage spikes, contrary to white branded PSUs which can't even handle half the load they advertise.
There is always the consideration you may want headroom for a future upgrade. Say you had a GTX 1060 and now have more spending money and (if you could buy one) wanted a RTX 3080. You’ll need more than a 550W PSU. So, considering potential upgrades is something you may want to do.
Thankfully power requirements hasn't changed much over the years, with each generation of hardware it either increases 5W or decreases 5W, in average always around same values.

PSU is pretty much the component we rarely change over the years in gaming builds, there's a reason they come with 10y warranties.

Bigger differences are in the different market branches (low, mid and high markets), so yes I wouldn't use a 550W PSU on a RTX 3080 build.
 
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Marana

Level 1
Jan 21, 2018
35
I practically never shut down my PC at home and reboot it usually about once per month (when the monthly Windows Update package requests for it). When I don't use my PC, I simply put into Sleep mode - backed up with a UPS. Shutting down or rebooting the PC would mean to lose the context I was having, i.e. all the open programs and documents.

In my opinion it would be very inefficient and annoying to rebuild the work environment / context every time when arriving to the PC.

In this sense I'm still missing the days of Windows NT 4.0 that I remember having run continuously (without a single shutdown or reboot) for about one full year in my office desktop... not to mention the good old VAX/VMS computers, for which I remember the longest individual uptime having been about 17 years (which was eventually reset due to a Y2K update - that later turned out to having been unnecessary...) :)
 

Opc9

Level 6
Aug 2, 2020
268
In terms of wear and tear older PC components that use Electrolytic Capacitor have limited lifespan around 3 years
depending on operating temperatures.

Newer Gen higher end Motherboards, PSU, GPU's and Laptops that use solid capacitors can last up to 23 years.

If you are running older hardware it maybe better to shut down than leave it on even with power saving features on.
 
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