Q&A How many times a day you shut down your PC?

roger_m

Level 33
Verified
Content Creator
Dec 4, 2014
2,280
Could it be a program that I used, messed something up? Can windows have errors causing HDD end to end error? I dunno if there's an issue with cable, it looks perfect... I took it out and put back in, (switch sides) same error.

What issue do you think it could be, if not a failing Drive ?

Its true, I never encounter any problems on the drive itself.
No it won't be a program causing it. I wouldn't worry about it since it's only happened four times. But you can use HD Sentinel to keep an eye on it and see if it increases.
 

plat1098

Level 24
Verified
Sep 13, 2018
1,380
I'm curious: starting with Windows 1909, I'm noticing shutdown was really optimized. The machine would shut off in < 1 second. Now it takes 3-5 seconds, still pretty decent. Is this what others are experiencing when they shut down their computers?

I remember in days of yore when it could drag on and on. Yuck.
 

Dex4Sure

Level 3
May 14, 2019
112
My spare desktop with Core i7 2600K (10 years old now) still works, despite it was practically turned on and off pretty much every day... And the CPU has been running overclocked at 4.4GHz the whole time at around 1.3V vcore. Only thing I observed as the CPU aged was that I had to slightly keep raising the vcore voltage over the years to keep it stable at 4.4GHz. Another system with Core i7 7700K, still running with 0 issues since 2017 and was used in similar manner.

Many people I know have had really similar experiences as well, like 1 guy had his i5 2500K system work over 8 years before the CPU finally gave in (he auto overclocked it, so the CPU degraded quicker from higher voltage). And yes, he did also turn it on and off every day. So I disagree based on experience with that article. Modern computers can handle turning on and off just fine. That was something you'd worry back in 1990's and early to mid 2000's... Today? Not really.
 

amirr

Level 15
Jan 26, 2020
725
My spare desktop with Core i7 2600K (10 years old now) still works, despite it was practically turned on and off pretty much every day... And the CPU has been running overclocked at 4.4GHz the whole time at around 1.3V vcore. Only thing I observed as the CPU aged was that I had to slightly keep raising the vcore voltage over the years to keep it stable at 4.4GHz. Another system with Core i7 7700K, still running with 0 issues since 2017 and was used in similar manner.

Many people I know have had really similar experiences as well, like 1 guy had his i5 2500K system work over 8 years before the CPU finally gave in (he auto overclocked it, so the CPU degraded quicker from higher voltage). And yes, he did also turn it on and off every day. So I disagree based on experience with that article. Modern computers can handle turning on and off just fine. That was something you'd worry back in 1990's and early to mid 2000's... Today? Not really.
Thanks for sharing.
 
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blackice

Level 33
Verified
Apr 1, 2019
2,203
My spare desktop with Core i7 2600K (10 years old now) still works, despite it was practically turned on and off pretty much every day... And the CPU has been running overclocked at 4.4GHz the whole time at around 1.3V vcore. Only thing I observed as the CPU aged was that I had to slightly keep raising the vcore voltage over the years to keep it stable at 4.4GHz. Another system with Core i7 7700K, still running with 0 issues since 2017 and was used in similar manner.

Many people I know have had really similar experiences as well, like 1 guy had his i5 2500K system work over 8 years before the CPU finally gave in (he auto overclocked it, so the CPU degraded quicker from higher voltage). And yes, he did also turn it on and off every day. So I disagree based on experience with that article. Modern computers can handle turning on and off just fine. That was something you'd worry back in 1990's and early to mid 2000's... Today? Not really.
I agree with this. You are probably morel likely to have the power supply fail than any of the components which have multiple levels of power regulation before they get hit with any voltage. I used to turn my older computers completely off every day and never had issues even back then. I only leave mine sleeping now for automatic backups.
 

Dex4Sure

Level 3
May 14, 2019
112
I agree with this. You are probably morel likely to have the power supply fail than any of the components which have multiple levels of power regulation before they get hit with any voltage. I used to turn my older computers completely off every day and never had issues even back then. I only leave mine sleeping now for automatic backups.
Especially with good quality, modern power supplies... If a good quality PSU fails, it won't take the rest of the components down with it. A cheap one might just do it. I suspect a lot of times this is exactly what happened back in the day. I never cheaped out on power supplies on my PC builds.
 

blackice

Level 33
Verified
Apr 1, 2019
2,203
Especially with good quality, modern power supplies... If a good quality PSU fails, it won't take the rest of the components down with it. A cheap one might just do it. I suspect a lot of times this is exactly what happened back in the day. I never cheaped out on power supplies on my PC builds.
It’s the most overlooked part of the build, still. Because it’s not exciting. I nerd out and read lots of psu reviews when I do a build.
 

Dex4Sure

Level 3
May 14, 2019
112
It’s the most overlooked part of the build, still. Because it’s not exciting. I nerd out and read lots of psu reviews when I do a build.
I just tend to be brand loyal to Seasonic. A lot of the best rated Corsair power supplies (at least back in the day) were made by Seasonic and sold under Corsair name. Just buying high efficiency Seasonic PSU can't go wrong, but sure its good to keep yourself up to date still in case they had dropped the ball. My current build has Seasonic Prime Platinum rated 850W PSU with 10 year warranty. The other (10 years old build) has Corsair AX750W Gold rated PSU (which was also manufactured by Seasonic) and if I recall right, it had 7 years warranty when I bought it.
 

SecurityNightmares

Level 40
Verified
Jan 9, 2020
2,955
No, it won't be used for any gaming or video, or sound editing.
It's German but you can look at this site which provide some good builds for every wallet:
 

Local Host

Level 24
Verified
Sep 26, 2017
1,318
Depends on your hardware. If it's a gaming PC, 550W PSU can be tricky.
I disagree, a mid range gaming PC will use around 300W, so a 550W is more than enough.

For the high-end, 650W is pretty much standard.

The enthusiasts that like to waste money and end up getting PSUs at 800W or higher.

As always PSU brand matters, a cheap PSU at 550W is not the same as a branded PSU at 550W. As already suggested by others here, Seasonic is among the best on the market.
 
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