misterman2100

Level 1
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I've had much success with using KDE Neon and Kubuntu - KDE is rather light in both iterations. MX Linux is also quite well done and highly recommended, too. Xubuntu has not had any major improvements, but is a workhorse; you can also test out Linux Mint's XFCE. (I also have a soft spot for Peppermint OS, which is largely XFCE now.) Manjaro is very popular and well regarded, although I am more partial to Debian-based distros. In any case, use Rufus and distro hop a bit to see what suits you.
 

Tiamati

Level 7
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Ty guys, i'll take a look in all distros you mentioned. I've already had contact with Linux Mint (but not the xfce version). I got curious about Linux MX cause some friends didn't like it haha.

I've heard KDE was a little heavy too. Is it going to make a big difference compared with XFCE?

Btw, i tried to enter in Peppermint OS website, but bitdefender blocked it: https://peppermintos.com/

I heard Clear Linux's
I'll take a look. I can post my impressions later. Ty for the suggestion.
 

misterman2100

Level 1
Verified
I've heard KDE was a little heavy too. Is it going to make a big difference compared with XFCE?

Btw, i tried to enter in Peppermint OS website, but bitdefender blocked it: https://peppermintos.com/
I had used KDE Neon on an old Lenovo G550 with a Pentium 4300 processor; albeit there were some hiccups related to the age of the system, such as video, it worked extraordinarily well. The performance is not that of KDE of old - very resource efficient while not compromising that Windows-like feel.

I'm assuming with Peppermint that they are trying to smooth things out since Mark Greaves - Peppermint's maintainer - had passed on fairly recently.

BTW, Real Clear Linux is not necessarily geared toward general purpose, especially with Gnome being default, but give it a go!
 

shmu26

Level 85
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Content Creator
If you want a feel similar to Windows, then KDE (Plasma) or Cinnamon, especially Mint Cinnamon. KDE uses less RAM.
If you want a great distro with minimal drain on system resources, it's the famed MX 18 with the default desktop (Xfce). Please note that MX 19 requires more system resources. By the way, MX is not very Windows-like.
However, "core i3, 4gb RAM" is enough power for any distro I know. Just install Kubuntu and you will be happy.
All Linux distros are secure enough for home users, and all of them are vulnerable to software installed from insecure sources. Stick to your distro's software center and you are safe. Try to avoid PPAs. And stay away from the Chinese distros (Deepin, Kylin) if you are privacy-minded.
That said, my current favorite is Mint 19.3 Xfce.
 
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Tiamati

Level 7
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I had used KDE Neon on an old Lenovo G550 with a Pentium 4300 processor; albeit there were some hiccups related to the age of the system, such as video, it worked extraordinarily well. The performance is not that of KDE of old - very resource efficient while not compromising that Windows-like feel.
I didn't know that. I'll take a look

Mark Greaves - Peppermint's maintainer - had passed on fairly recently.
:cry:

If you want a feel similar to Windows, then KDE (Plasma) or Cinnamon, especially Mint Cinnamon. KDE uses less RAM.
If you want a great distro with minimal drain on system resources, it's the famed MX 18 with the default desktop (Xfce). Please note that MX 19 requires more system resource
Ty! i'll check them so
 

Tiamati

Level 7
Verified
Well, i tried both Linux Mint Cinamon and Kubuntu. IMHO, kubunto was more complete to use out of the box... Anyway, despite Linux was indeed fast in my notebook, i got tired of so many bugs and technincal difficulties

In 1 day i faced:
- Bug with nvidia drive --> black screen when installed
- had to learn how disable it through commands
- had to learn how to install nvidia drive from nvidia website (cause it was newer than the buggy one offered through linux), and face a LOT of errors during install, just to discover, after a large amount of time trying and learning, that the new drive was buggy too.
- had to learn how to install basically anything that is not in the software center
- bug with kubuntu changing system language to default after updates
- faced a lot of problems learning the new language when looking for forum helps.... Somehtings like, "use root" (but i didn't know how to use, and than i had to learn that too)

Sooo, i gave up. Despite i think i would be able to learn everything again if i wanted and had the time to do that, i didn't want it. I wish i could install, fix a few problems and let it go... That not happened. So for now, i'll wait till Linux get rly user friendly (despite it really improved from the last years). Having to solve almost everything through commands just sucks if you're not in the mood for learning everything
 

misterman2100

Level 1
Verified
There is a learning curve when installing any distro. I will say, however, that if you allow yourself time to fail and learn and ask for help on respective forums, you will learn Linux. If it makes you feel better, Nvidia is notoriously problematic on Linux systems, so don't beat yourself up too much!

By the way, what software were you trying to install that gave you a hard time?
 

Tiamati

Level 7
Verified
I will say, however, that if you allow yourself time to fail and learn and ask for help on respective forums, you will learn Linux
I'm sure of it. But unfortunately i could not give myself the necessary time to do learn it now. I'll certainly try again after next ubuntu LTS version. It will be release near July if i not wrong. I just wish Linux went through a way that the learning curve could be more intuitive. A lot of programs and commands can only be learned with a guide. For example, i was impressed with so many commands like "sudo" "apt" "sh" "sudo -i" "get-apt purge" and others, that i didn't have any clue about how to use them properly till i start my process of fail and learn. I could learn them indeed, but i would never recomend Linux for someone lacking abilities to deal with it. For example, i'd love to install linux in a old notebook of my parents, but i'm sure they would crucify me later as they would not able to do almost anything they can do by themselves with windows right now. Even creating a folder shortcut in Linux mint was problematic (till i learn Ctrl+shift command)

Nvidia is notoriously problematic on Linux systems, so don't beat yourself up too much!
By the way, what software were you trying to install that gave you a hard time?
The worst one was Nvidia driver. I tried to install it manually as the Linux version was giving me black screens. For start i had to learn of how to execute the *.run file. After finally executing it, i had to learn how to root and how to locate the file trough commands. After that, i wen through a long list of errors like: 1)nouveau driver was already running; 2) the command to disable nouveau driver didn't work; 3) the kernel command to disable it didn't work too (something similar to rd-blacklist:nouveau) 4) During install process, a pre-script could not be run; 5) after that, a second "kernel command" installed by the driver didn't work; 6) i had to unninstal it, 7) reinstall, 8) got black screen. After that i could not disable the driver anymore. I tried nvidia.modset=0, apt purge nvidia and others. The only solution was to reinstall kubuntu. I had to do all that without even knowing where were the commands at the start, or how to inset kernel commands. So it was really frustrating.

After that, i gave up of nvidia driver and decided to test others installers. I decided to start with something i was familiar: an antivirus. I tried ESET and faced the same problem, now starting with a *.linux file, that i could not make easily run. So i decided i could not go further having to learn each detail just to face another problem in the "next curve". That's why i believe Linux really has to move into a more friendly use. That probably why Linux Mint is getting so famous nowadays.

It's a pitty, as i really liked Kubuntu. It was light, fast, beautiful and fun. I'll certainly give it another chance in the future.
 

shmu26

Level 85
Verified
Trusted
Content Creator
Hello guys! Can you suggest a linux distro appropriate for an 8 year notebook (core i3, 4gb RAM, without SSD). I'm looking for something light, similar to windows and secure.

Ty!
Indeed, NVIDIA is notorious for making issues on linux. And your linux experience is very similar to mine. So many issues arise, and you try to get help on forums, and the linux forums (with the exception of Mint) don't know how to help linux noobs very well. They don't understand you, and you don't understand them, even if you speak native-tongue English. The Mint forum has the opposite problem: they don't know how to help advanced users.
But if you are like me, after your frustration wears off you will try it again, and quit it again, until you eventually get it right. :)
 

Raiden

Level 16
Verified
Content Creator
Indeed, NVIDIA is notorious for making issues on linux. And your linux experience is very similar to mine. So many issues arise, and you try to get help on forums, and the linux forums (with the exception of Mint) don't know how to help linux noobs very well. They don't understand you, and you don't understand them, even if you speak native-tongue English. The Mint forum has the opposite problem: they don't know how to help advanced users.
But if you are like me, after your frustration wears off you will try it again, and quit it again, until you eventually get it right. :)
Dont get me wrong, I love linux and plan to switch to it fully one day, but I agree this is one of the reasons as to why it hasn't taken off on the pc side of things. Its become so much of a niche that many people in these communities forget that not everyone speaks the language as you said. You cannot troubleshoot anything without using the terminal, something linux needs to rely a little less on IMHO if they want it to grow on the pc side of things. They need to step outside their bubble sometimes and learn to help without assuming that everyone knows what their talking about.
 
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