B

BVLon

Dont get me wrong, I love linux and plan to switch to it fully one day, but I agree this is one of the reasons as to why it hasn't taken off on the pc side of things. Its become so much of a niche that many people in these communities forget that not everyone speaks the language as you said. You cannot trouble shoot anything without using the terminal, something that I think linux needs to rely a little less on if they want ot to grow on the pc side of things. They need to step outside their bubble sometimes and learn to help without assuming that everyone knows what your talking about.
Even I am not good with this damm thing and why should I be?
 

Tiamati

Level 7
Verified
But if you are like me, after your frustration wears off you will try it again, and quit it again, until you eventually get it right. :)
Sure, i would try more now if i had the time... but taking care of a 10 months baby is VERY time consuming haha

You have had a bad experience with a certain distribution, Try another one, until you find one that suits you.;)
Sure, i intend to give another try when ubunto releases the next LTS (i hope there will be some improvement)

They need to step outside their bubble sometimes and learn to help without assuming that everyone knows what your talking about.
What can i say? Just 👏👏👏👏

Have you tried a Chrome OS fork?
Nope, have you?
 

bribon77

Level 32
Verified
Dont get me wrong, I love linux and plan to switch to it fully one day, but I agree this is one of the reasons as to why it hasn't taken off on the pc side of things. Its become so much of a niche that many people in these communities forget that not everyone speaks the language as you said. You cannot trouble shoot anything without using the terminal, something that I think linux needs to rely a little less on if they want ot to grow on the pc side of things. They need to step outside their bubble sometimes and learn to help without assuming that everyone knows what your talking about.
I understand you, and it is true that sometimes the wiki and distribution forums should be more flexible to help, rather explain it better than they do now.
But Linux has advanced a lot, the console practically does not touch if you want the basics.
In terms of hardware, Linux makes a tremendous effort, making things work without the support of manufacturers.
But, of course, it is a different system than Windows. And there is a learning curve.
 

Tiamati

Level 7
Verified
But Linux has advanced a lot,
Indeed. I completely agree. I tried LINUX i few years ago, and it's amazing how it improved

the console practically does not touch if you want the basics.
Sure, if i didn't want to dig into drives or out of the box softwares, i would have faced less problems.

In terms of hardware, Linux makes a tremendous effort, making things work without the support of manufacturers.
The nouveau driver indeed worked well.
 

Raiden

Level 16
Verified
Content Creator
I understand you, and it is true that sometimes the wiki and distribution forums should be more flexible to help, rather explain it better than they do now.
But Linux has advanced a lot, the console practically does not touch if you want the basics.
In terms of hardware, Linux makes a tremendous effort, making things work without the support of manufacturers.
But, of course, it is a different system than Windows. And there is a learning curve.
Oh dont get me wrong, they have made tremendous strides and continue to do so. I mean if all someone wants to do is check emails and surf, its already perfectly set up from that. Once you start deviating a little from that though is where it starts to get a little dicey at times. Still ot has greatly improved, but still needs a little work to simplify and be a little more consistent IMO.

Constistancy is another big issue for linux. There are way more distros then you can count on all your fingers and toes. Furthermore they all have different ways of doing things (ie: sudo apt-get, sudo pacman and sudo dfn). These all do the same thing in principle, but they are different enough that it can be confusing for someone new wanting to switch over.
 

bribon77

Level 32
Verified
Oh dont get me wrong, they have made tremendous strides and continue to do so. I mean if all someone wants to do is check emails and surf, its already perfectly set up from that. Once you start deviating a little from that though is where it starts to get a little dicey at times. Still ot has greatly improved, but still needs a little work to simplify and be a little more consistent IMO.

Constistancy is another big issue for linux. There are way more distros then you can count on all your fingers and toes. Furthermore they all have different ways of doing things (ie: sudo apt-get, sudo pacman and sudo dfn). These all do the same thing in principle, but they are different enough that it can be confusing for someone new wanting to switch over.
I totally agree with you.
If there are too many distributions, that's why I always recommend Ubuntu or its derivatives,
not because it is better, but because there is more information on the network and even on YouTube.
 

Raiden

Level 16
Verified
Content Creator
Ty guys, i'll take a look in all distros you mentioned. I've already had contact with Linux Mint (but not the xfce version). I got curious about Linux MX cause some friends didn't like it haha.

I've heard KDE was a little heavy too. Is it going to make a big difference compared with XFCE?

Btw, i tried to enter in Peppermint OS website, but bitdefender blocked it: https://peppermintos.com/



I'll take a look. I can post my impressions later. Ty for the suggestion.
You've gotten some great recommendations. As I am sure you have already noticed, Linux comes in many flavors and everyone will have their preferences as to which one they like. Whats nice about Linux is that you can run the Live Iso and test it out (won't be as fast as installing it), but you can try it and see what you think.

Xfce is known to be a very light weight interface, but KDE is pretty good also. KDE use to have the reputation of being very heavy, but ever since they released KDE plasma (version 5), it has been very quick and smooth IMHO. Another one to try is Manjaro, it comes both with KDE and Xfce, but I've found it to be quite lite even in a VM. My other favorite is Kubuntu.

I say keep playing around with various distros and find which one you like. Definitely take the time to read and watch videos to help learn the nuances of these distros. There's quite a good amount of info out there to help you, but it can be a little confusing at times. Take you time play around with them and get comfortable.

The worst one was Nvidia driver. I tried to install it manually as the Linux version was giving me black screens. For start i had to learn of how to execute the *.run file. After finally executing it, i had to learn how to root and how to locate the file trough commands. After that, i wen through a long list of errors like: 1)nouveau driver was already running; 2) the command to disable nouveau driver didn't work; 3) the kernel command to disable it didn't work too (something similar to rd-blacklist:nouveau) 4) During install process, a pre-script could not be run; 5) after that, a second "kernel command" installed by the driver didn't work; 6) i had to unninstal it, 7) reinstall, 8) got black screen. After that i could not disable the driver anymore. I tried nvidia.modset=0, apt purge nvidia and others. The only solution was to reinstall kubuntu. I had to do all that without even knowing where were the commands at the start, or how to inset kernel commands. So it was really frustrating.

After that, i gave up of nvidia driver and decided to test others installers. I decided to start with something i was familiar: an antivirus. I tried ESET and faced the same problem, now starting with a *.linux file, that i could not make easily run. So i decided i could not go further having to learn each detail just to face another problem in the "next curve". That's why i believe Linux really has to move into a more friendly use. That probably why Linux Mint is getting so famous nowadays.

It's a pitty, as i really liked Kubuntu. It was light, fast, beautiful and fun. I'll certainly give it another chance in the future.
Ah welcome to the world of Linux.:p

Yes it can be a pain at times to get things running optimally. Some distros are better at it than others. Nvidia seems to be a pain in some instances when it it comes to Linux. AMD however seems to get along quite nice on Linux by comparison. I would still keep trying distros until you find the one you like most and works with your hardware (driver wise). As I've said above, when you have free time, make sure to read/watch Youtube videos as they are a wealth of knowledge when it comes to Linux. Trust me, there are many people before you that have run in to the same issue, so usually there is plenty of info out there on how to get around some of these things.
 

Tiamati

Level 7
Verified
For me, hardware support on Manjaro Xfce is tops. You never know what will work out of the box until you try it, but Manjaro XFce is worth a try.
So it will be at the top of my list, next time i install Linux. I wasn't counting with Manjaro cause i heard they only "professionalized" their work this year. So i was waiting a little till it get solid.
 

Lenny_Fox

Level 10
My experience has been good.
+1 Now even Snap containers are a peace of cake to install
 
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Lenny_Fox

Level 10
I had the opposite experience on real system (with old hardware): Manjaro XFCE slightly snappier than MX Linux XFCE, but even when Linux MX would have been faster (e.g. Xubuntu was snappier than Manjaro when I tested/tried out different distros), I am appreciating the simplicity of rolling updates.

Even Windows10 with is continues (rolling half year major updates) looks complicated compared to Manjaro rolling updates. I don't understand why other distro's don't follow the example of Arch/Manjaro. It is so much more user friendlier compared to the hassle of updating from one LTE version to the next LTE distro.
 

Tiamati

Level 7
Verified
I had the opposite experience on real system (with old hardware): Manjaro XFCE slightly snappier than MX Linux XFCE, but even when Linux MX would have been faster (e.g. Xubuntu was snappier than Manjaro when I tested/tried out different distros), I am appreciating the simplicity of rolling updates.

Even Windows10 with is continues (rolling half year major updates) looks complicated compared to Manjaro rolling updates. I don't understand why other distro's don't follow the example of Arch/Manjaro. It is so much more user friendlier compared to the hassle of updating from one LTE version to the next LTE distro.
Comparing MX, Xubunto and Manjaro, wich one is more polished considering you don't have to use commands all the time?
 

Lenny_Fox

Level 10
Not many differences, they all have package managers to install programs. You should try a few out as other members have suggested.

I tried just for fun a few low spec distro's like: Kubuntu, Ubuntu, Linux Lite and a few midrange spec distro's like, MX, Mint and Manjaro. Even on old hardware mid-range distro's provide good enough response and startup.

Manjaro's payoff is "enjoy the simplicity" I think they are providing what they are promising.
 
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