Microsoft is killing off Internet Explorer on Windows 10

Gandalf_The_Grey

Level 75
Thread author
Verified
Honorary Member
Top Poster
Content Creator
Well-known
Apr 24, 2016
6,450
Microsoft has already confirmed it will kill off defunct web browsers in the coming months and additional details are finally available. According to updated support documentation, Internet Explorer is set to stop working next year and the browser will be retired on June 15, 2022.
Internet Explorer was first released in 1995 and it currently sits at a mere 1% market share, according to StatCounter data (down from 95% when it was popular).
Microsoft is currently planning to end support for the Internet Explorer 11 desktop app on June 15, 2022. After June, it will no longer receive updates or support on certain versions of Windows 10.

Microsoft is disabling Internet Explorer on these versions/editions of Windows:
  • Windows 10 version 20H2 and later.
  • Windows 10 IoT (version 20H2 and later).
This change affects all supported consumer and enterprise editions of Windows 10, but there won’t be any noticeable changes if you use in-market Windows 10 LTSC or Server edition of Internet Explorer 11.
Internet Explorer migration plans:
If you don’t use Internet Explorer at home or office, there’s no action required from your end. However, if you still use the browser for some reasons, Microsoft recommends a transition to Chromium Edge before June 15, 2022.

Once you’ve migrated to Microsoft Edge, you’ll find all your browsing data from Internet Explorer in a few clicks. In a business environment, if you need to run a site designed for Internet Explorer, you can always use built-in Internet Explorer mode in Edge.
In addition to Internet Explorer, Microsoft Edge Legacy is also going away and Adobe Flash Player will be removed in the coming weeks as well.
 

Gandalf_The_Grey

Level 75
Thread author
Verified
Honorary Member
Top Poster
Content Creator
Well-known
Apr 24, 2016
6,450
I still need it for work.
Luckily, the site (using ActiveX) runs on Edge in compatibility mode, but then you have an annoying banner that you are running in compatibility mode with an off button.
Hope that will be refined before they kill IE.
 

Gandalf_The_Grey

Level 75
Thread author
Verified
Honorary Member
Top Poster
Content Creator
Well-known
Apr 24, 2016
6,450
I still need it for work.
Luckily, the site (using ActiveX) runs on Edge in compatibility mode, but then you have an annoying banner that you are running in compatibility mode with an off button.
Hope that will be refined before they kill IE.
More info can be found in this Bleeping Computer article:
Especially this video shows that when properly configured my "problems" are gone:

Must talk with IT soon...
 

rain2reign

Level 8
Verified
Well-known
Jun 21, 2020
363
To be honest any IT department had at least 5 years time to find, or build a solution without depending on Microsoft. Especially so, since there is no guarantee that the compatibility 'mode' will even work properly. Of course, some in IT may say "but it's not that easy", well Microsoft announced (I hint at planning, not setting a date) its plans for retiring IE many a year ago and then another couple of times during, and after, Edge Chromium release.

Negligence in my opinion at this point, if they haven't solved it for their application solutions for their company by now. It's the same story as the Flash debacle the way I see it, only IE instead of Flash in the title.
 

silversurfer

Level 85
Verified
Honorary Member
Top Poster
Content Creator
Malware Hunter
Well-known
Aug 17, 2014
9,973
Yesterday, Microsoft began its next phase of Internet Explorer's demise by no longer supporting Microsoft 365.

"Support is now unavailable for Microsoft 365 apps and services on IE11. Additionally, you should expect no new features when accessing Microsoft 365 apps and services on IE11 and that the daily usage experience for users could get progressively worse over time until the apps and services are disconnected," explained Microsoft in an updated blog post. "Banners will be used to communicate and alert users to upcoming changes in experience, such as app or service disconnection and/or redirection."
 

silversurfer

Level 85
Verified
Honorary Member
Top Poster
Content Creator
Malware Hunter
Well-known
Aug 17, 2014
9,973
Microsoft has reminded Windows customers today that they'll finally retire the Internet Explorer 11 web browser from some Windows 10 versions in June and replace it with the new Chromium-based Microsoft Edge.

After Internet Explorer is retired, Microsoft will still support legacy Internet Explorer-based websites and applications within Microsoft Edge via the built-in Internet Explorer mode (IE mode) feature.

"As previously announced, the future of Internet Explorer on Windows is in Microsoft Edge," Microsoft said in an announcement published on Wednesday.
"The Internet Explorer 11 (IE11) desktop application will be retired on June 15, 2022, for certain versions of Windows 10."

After being retired on June 15, 2022, the Internet Explorer desktop application will be disabled and out of support, automatically redirecting the users to Microsoft Edge when launched.
 

upnorth

Moderator
Verified
Staff Member
Malware Hunter
Well-known
Jul 27, 2015
5,449
Not a browser I personal will miss much even if I used it from time to time over the years.

After reading a few pages in the " Getting Started Guide " , Edge IE mode feels like it's not gonna be the best experience in town for those that actually needs to use it. A bit too much manual work and not just " flip a switch ". It also don't exist for macOS according to MS own document.
 

silversurfer

Level 85
Verified
Honorary Member
Top Poster
Content Creator
Malware Hunter
Well-known
Aug 17, 2014
9,973

Microsoft: please stop using Internet Explorer before it runs out of support next month​

Microsoft is asking organizations to set a retirement date for Internet Explorer before June 15, 2022 to ensure that company employees won't run into issues when IE retires.

Internet Explorer 11 won't start anymore on its retirement date and Microsoft Edge will be loaded automatically, according to Microsoft. The company suggests that the new Microsoft Edge web browser is used instead by organizations, as it supports legacy Internet Explorer features through its IE Mode functionality.

IE Mode may load local and remote content that requires specific Internet technologies. Modern web browsers such as Edge, Chrome or Firefox do not support these technologies, and the loading of services may fail completely or functionality may be limited, when these browsers are used.

Only Microsoft Edge supports IE Mode, making it an essential application for organizations that require access to content that requires specific Internet Explorer technologies.

Microsoft recommends the following preparations for setting a retirement day for Internet Explorer 11:
  1. Testing IE Mode to make sure that everything is set up correctly and working. Sites need to be tested in IE Mode to ensure that it works properly and that work flows continue to work in the mode. IT administrators may pilot the change with groups of users, for instance, by using the Disable IE policy to make Edge the default application right away on select systems.
  2. Setting a date for the retirement if Internet Explorer in the organization. Using the Disable IE policy, organizations may set a retirement date for IE that is set before June 15. Microsoft recommends a retirement date that is weeks in advanced of the end of support date of the browser.
  3. Informing users and data importing. Employees need to be aware of the change, as data needs to be migrated from Internet Explorer to Microsoft Edge. Microsoft recommends that users import their date from IE to Edge before the retirement date. Users may load edge://settings/importData in the Edge address bar and select Microsoft Internet Explorer to start the importing of data from the browser.
  4. Deploy the policy that blocks Internet Explorer.
 

silversurfer

Level 85
Verified
Honorary Member
Top Poster
Content Creator
Malware Hunter
Well-known
Aug 17, 2014
9,973

Microsoft explains how it is retiring Internet Explorer​

On June 15, 2022, Microsoft is retiring its Internet Explorer browser. The move affects most Windows 10 devices, but there are devices on which Internet Explorer remains available. Even on Windows 10, Internet Explorer will be retired in two phases, over the course of the coming months.
Microsoft plans to introduce the redirection from Internet Explorer to Microsoft Edge in the coming "few months". The company notes that devices will redirect gradually so that organizations may "identify and resolve any potential issues". Internet Explorer is not disabled in this phase, but it can't be launched anymore on devices on which the redirect has been implemented on.

Internet Explorer will be disabled permanently in the second phase, after the first phase completes. The browser will be disabled permanently via Windows Update as part of optional preview updates and cumulative updates for Windows 10.
 

rain2reign

Level 8
Verified
Well-known
Jun 21, 2020
363
I have said this last year, a few posts up, and I still stand by it. Any IT department worth it's budget would have replaced it by now. In fact, Microsoft has been saying it for years that they don't recommend Internet Explorer on any level and grandfathered it. If it's still not replaced inside a business or commits problems... Can only be one of three things:
  1. Lazy/terrible IT department;
  2. Supervisor(s) blocking change for whatever reasons, if not higher on the chain;
  3. Or budget cuts to the point that the "department" itself can't even be considered bare-bones anymore...
Either way, it's negligence of the highest order. And Ironic enough, I still see a lot of mentions that the switch is problematic for some businesses. And you had what? Close to 6-7 years by now to figure it out.
 

Gandalf_The_Grey

Level 75
Thread author
Verified
Honorary Member
Top Poster
Content Creator
Well-known
Apr 24, 2016
6,450
AdGuard Blog: Bye, Internet Explorer, you won’t be missed: Once omnipresent browser king retires in exile
We all knew that this would happen, and finally, the day has come: Microsoft officially ended support for its first-born but long estranged browser, Internet Explorer 11, on June 15, 2022 for Windows 10.
 

upnorth

Moderator
Verified
Staff Member
Malware Hunter
Well-known
Jul 27, 2015
5,449
Though IE has a negligible share of the browser market worldwide these days (0.52%), many enterprises still run it or have legacy applications tied to IE. This appears to be the case in countries such as Japan and Korea. Stories in Nikkei Asia and Japan Times this week quoted a survey by Keyman's Net showing that nearly 49% of 350 Japanese companies surveyed are still using IE. Another report in South Korea's MBN pointed to several large organizations still running IE.

"Internet Explorer has been around for over 20 years and many companies have invested in using it for many things beyond just Web browsing," says Todd Schell, senior product manager at Ivanti. There are still enterprise applications tied closely to IE that often are running older, customized scripts on their website or have apps that may require older scripts. "For example, companies may have built extensive scripts that generate and then display reports in IE. They have not invested in updating them to use HTML 5 for Edge or other modern browsers." Such organizations face the sort of security issues associated with every other software technology that is no longer supported. Running IE 11 as a standalone app past its end of support date means that previously unknown — or worse yet, known but unpatched — vulnerabilities can be exploited going forward, Schell says.

"This is true for any application or operating system but has historically been an even bigger issue for browsers, which have such widespread use," Schell says. It's hard to say how many organizations worldwide are presently stuck using a technology that is no longer supported because they did not migrate away sooner. But judging by the fact that Microsoft will continue to support compatibility mode in Edge until 2029, IE likely remains in widespread use
 

About us

  • MalwareTips is a community-driven platform providing the latest information and resources on malware and cyber threats. Our team of experienced professionals and passionate volunteers work to keep the internet safe and secure. We provide accurate, up-to-date information and strive to build a strong and supportive community dedicated to cybersecurity.

User Menu

Follow us

Follow us on Facebook or Twitter to know first about the latest cybersecurity incidents and malware threats.

Top