Opinion: VPNs and browsers — staying secure while online

Gandalf_The_Grey

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In business, we’ve used Virtual Private Networks (VPNs) for years. But I’m now seeing recommendations that consumers use VPN software to make internet connections more private so sites can’t snoop on your surfing and other communications. As someone who runs a website that uses IP address reputation as a guide to know who is and is not reputable on my site, I can tell you that using a VPN often assigns you an IP address that’s less than stellar. As a result, if you attempt to access sites that check for reputation, such as your bank, you may find yourself blocked.

I’m not against the concept of consumer-based VPN software, but I’m not convinced it’s the security panacea many think it is. Users think it’s keeping sites from tracking them, or keeping them safe when surfing on coffee shop Wi-Fi. They think it keeps prying eyes from reviewing our web traffic. But all VPN software is not created equal. I recently read new research from Consumer Reports that tested various VPN platforms; I was surprised to find that the top VPN providers included vendors I’ve not even heard of.

As the publication points out in the article and related white paper, ultimately you decide who or what you trust while online. Do you trust your ISP or a VPN vendor to watch what you connect to? If you don’t trust your ISP, you might want to change to a different ISP, one that has a better reputation. Also consider that nearly all of the websites we visit now support https:// and thus, the transmission to that site is protected by an SSL certificate and can’t be intercepted if you go online using public Wi-Fi. As pointed out a while back in Wired, concerns about the use of public Wi-Fi are now lessened as we’ve moved to an always-https:// world.

One security suggestion I have is to use different browsers based on what you are doing online. Use one for more sensitive tasks such as online banking, and another browser for generic surfing. As Consumer Reports notes, instead of focusing on a VPN, consider “using a password manager, setting up multifactor authentication, enabling HTTPS-only mode on your web browser, and blocking ads or trackers with a tool like Privacy Badger or uBlock Origin.”
So when do I use VPN software? Honestly, it’s when I want to pretend to be located in another country to get around arbitrary geo-blocking that limits access to certain websites. (There are videos I like to watch that are blocked from the United States; when I use a VPN that broadcasts an IP address from another country, I can access the video.) But, like Consumer Reports, I’m of the opinion that a VPN does not protect internet surfing from prying eyes. Instead, it simply moves that risk from your ISP to the VPN vendor. As Consumer Reports notes, instead of using VPNs, prioritize blocking ads or trackers with tools like Privacy Badger or uBlock Origin.
 

n8chavez

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You are very anti-VPN, aren't you? Every post I se from you know has a negative view of them. It's funny though, I hardly consider consumer reports an authority on technical matters.
 

Gandalf_The_Grey

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You are very anti-VPN, aren't you? Every post I se from you know has a negative view of them. It's funny though, I hardly consider consumer reports an authority on technical matters.
No, I'm not (really) anti-VPN :D
We use a VPN at work when working from home to securely connect to the office network.
I have an active subscription on AdGuard's VPN, but I almost never use it.

I just don't see the need for a normal consumer to use one unless it is to get around geo-blocking.

It of course can be completely different for other people.
From the consumer reports article:
Finally, if you are an activist, a journalist with sources to protect, or are at heightened risk because of who you are or what you do, a VPN might be part of the solution.
So enlighten me, why should I need a VPN?
 
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n8chavez

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Feb 26, 2021
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No, I'm not (really) anti-VPN :D
We use a VPN at work when working from home to securely connect to the office network.
I have an active subscription on AdGuard's VPN, but I almost never use it.

I just don't see the need for a normal consumer to use one unless it is to get around geo-blocking.

It of course can be completely different for other people.
From the consumer reports article:

So enlighten me, why should I need a VPN?

Privacy reasons; to not have my IP logged. You have to trust either your ISP or your VPN. But my ISP has never been audited, and shown to not keep logs. Mullvad has. And besides, I've been getting a lot of identity theft alerts lately (my email and address were sold), so I figure it couldn't turn to have another layer in between me and the interwebs. Now, does that mean that a VPN is the ultimate solution? No, it's not. But, Mullvad + NextDNS (Windows 11 universal DoH) + rotating MAC + HTTPS only mode in Waterfox w/ uBo is not a bad start.
 
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