Troubleshoot PC Turns Off Whilst Gaming

Theoretical

Level 2
Aug 7, 2016
55
PC Specifications:

CPU: i7 4790K
GPU: Nvidia GTX 970
PSU: Corsair CX750 750W
Motherboard: Gigabyte Z97-HD3
RAM: 16Gb

Hi, so for a while now I have been experiencing an issue where I would be in game and suddenly my PC would turn completely off, an example of game I have played where this has occurred was DayZ SA.

I first experienced this issue a few months back but took little notice and uninstalled steam because of college work, however recently I tried playing DayZ SA again and the issue occurred again.

I have in the past tried monitoring CPU and GPU temps whilst in game and they were normal when the issue occurred.

I have also considered it might be my PSU causing the issue but considering reliability and stability of corsair PSU's I have not concluded that this is the issue yet.

Any help to assist me in resolving my issue would be very appreciated.
 

BoraMurdar

Community Manager
Verified
Staff member
Aug 30, 2012
6,613
After 10 minutes of running the benchmark.

s7Pkoin.png
Then, it's accurate. Your CPU is overheating.

Preparation
Do not open your computer while it is running or with any cables attached to it. It is always safer to remove all peripherals such as USB cables, audio cables, video cables, and especially the power cable.

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Do not attempt to clean your computer with electricity flowing through its circuits. Be sure that the power cable is unplugged.

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Now move your computer to a well-ventilated area such as your backyard or garage. This is especially important to consider if your computer has built up a lot of dust that will blowing around. Breathing all that old, accumulated dust just can’t be good for you.

If you’re limited on space just be sure to keep a vacuum (not for cleaning the inside of the computer; more on that soon) nearby for a quick clean up afterwards. And if you’re worried about inhaling dust, you can always stop at your local hardware stop to pick up a cheap dust mask for less than $5.

Tools
Before you begin opening your computer’s case, you’ll need to gather your cleaning tools. We highly recommend not using a vacuum. This can create a static buildup and could potentially fry important electrical components on your motherboard, video card, and other places. It’s just a bad idea, so spare yourself the agony and pick up a compressed air can.

There are a few tools you will need to clean your computer:

  • Hardware set that includes screw drivers
  • Can of compressed air
  • Cleaning cloth
  • Zip ties (optional)
  • Scissors (optional)
  • Cotton swabs (optional)
  • Thermal paste (optional)
  • Pencil or pen (optional)
One of our readers, Carlos, suggests using a small paint brush to sweep away dust where compressed air just can’t reach. Some of these tools are optional, so don’t stress out if you don’t have them. We only had a few ourselves, and still managed to do a great job.

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Now that you’re in a well-ventilated area with all your tools gathered, we can start the preparation process by opening up your computer’s case. All computer cases are different. If you’ve never opened yours before and are having trouble opening it, consult your computer’s manual or try searching online for guides specifically about your opening your model.

The case we’re using is a Sigma Luna WB, and, just like most cases, all it takes is unscrewing two screws, sliding the side-panel outward, and our computer was opened.

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Once inside your computer, you may have to disconnect any cables that connect to your side panel.

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To make the cleaning process easier, it’s best to take out any components that can be easily removed. Most desktop computers allow you to remove RAM sticks, video cards, and hard drives.

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We recommend not removing your CPU because thermal paste that is used to transfer heat from the top of the processor to the fan needs to be replaced every time the fan is removed. If you are equipped with thermal paste and want to remove your CPU, just be sure to clean off the old thermal paste on your CPU with rubbing alcohol and a soft cloth. Then apply a fresh coat of thermal paste once you’re done cleaning your computer.

Most people shouldn’t need to remove their CPU and CPU fan. It just doesn’t make sense considering barely any dust makes its way into the CPU socket. Then again, if you’re cleaning your computer, why not go all the way? The choice is yours.

Cleaning
To start the cleaning process, begin with the peripherals we just removed. Grab your can of compressed air and hold the trigger to release a burst of air onto an area with a lot of dust buildup. We’re cleaning an old video card that never got a lot of attention, so there was some dust clumps that were accumulating around the DVI ports. If you’re cleaning a video card with a fan, you can use a pen or pencil to place in between the blades to prevent it from spinning while blowing the compressed air.

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Next, we move inside the computer case. Let’s start with removing any dust particles that may have found their way inside the RAM slots. Take your compressed air can, aim it at a RAM slot, hold the trigger, and move it down the entire slot. Repeat this for every slot in your computer case.

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Now we’ll move onto the bigger equipment inside such as your CPU fan and power supply unit. Again, it’s recommended to use a pen or pencil when cleaning fans to prevent the blades from spinning. Use your compressed air can to blow out any loose dust particles.

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You can also use a cotton swab to clean the fan by rubbing the swab against the blades to stick the dust particles. It’s a little tedious, but it makes for a nice, clean fan in the end.

The bottom of your case will undoubtedly have dust buildup. You can begin with blowing the dust away with your compressed air. If there is still dust stuck to the case, you can use a damp cloth to wipe it. Make sure your cloth is not wet, but damp. Repeat this step for all the nooks of your case until there is minimal or no amounts of dust left.

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Finally, don’t forget to also clean out any other fans, ports, or enclosures as described above.

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Decluttering Cables (Optional)
This next step is optional and is recommended for custom built computers. Unlike professionally manufactured computers, custom built computers don’t arrive with nicely tucked away cabling that fits just right. So the best way to make your case more secure and organized is to use zip ties. You also don’t want your CPU fan or any other fans scraping away at cables if they’re not neatly tucked away.

To start you’ll need a pack of zip ties. It doesn’t matter what size they are as long as they can fit around all your cables. We’ll be using 4-inch zip ties.

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Begin by disconnecting all cables that will need to be tied. Be sure to write down how they were connected for reference later.

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When you have a cable or set of cables grouped to your liking, wrap a zip tie around it and run the thin end through the fastener. Then tighten the zip tie by pulling the thin end until you can no longer tighten it. Grab your scissors and cut the excess.

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Repeat this step for as many cables as possible. You can then tuck them away to reduce their visibility and give your computer’s guts a cleaner look.

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The Aftermath
Plug your cables back into their correct sockets. Refer to your document from earlier if you don’t remember where each cable goes. Also remember to put back any removed peripherals, such as a video card or sticks of RAM, back into their appropriate sockets.



Your computer, inside and out, should be looking as good as new. We’ve rid our computer of dust, hair, skin particles, and much more. Your cables should be neatly managed and out of the way of fans and other sensitive equipment. If you were having heating issues before, you’ll begin to notice that it’s thing of the past. And don’t forget to clean your computer every 3 to 6 months to keep that performance up!
 
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aragornnnn

Level 12
Verified
Aug 18, 2016
561
that looks very high!!! and your PC didn't shut down during the torture test but only in DayZ!

It might be shutting down during gaming due to thermal protection, but am surprise it didn't during benchmark......
Probably the benchmark has built in protection :)

What is the best way to clean components of dust without damaging them, would a hair dryer on cool air work?
Compressed air
 
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BoraMurdar

Community Manager
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Staff member
Aug 30, 2012
6,613
Yes, thermal paste and better cooler is probably the best, but better clean all the fans and eradicate the dust first, then re-run the test and check for temperatures, if those aren't in optimal range then consider changing the thermal paste, and at the end, the CPU cooler.
 
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SHvFl

Level 35
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Content Creator
Nov 19, 2014
2,338
Would this cooler be compatible with an i7 4790K and is it any good or can anyone recommend anything better within that price range or cheaper?

Cooler Master Hyper 212 Evo CPU Cooler "RR-212E-16PK-R1, 4 Heatpipe, 1x 120mm PWM Fan, Intel / AMD":Amazon.co.uk:Computers & Accessories
Does it fit in your case? It's a long cooler(160cm i believe from memory). If it fits it's a decent cooler go for it.

EDIT: Also depending on your motherboard and if your ram has a heatsink it might not fit.
 
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SHvFl

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Nov 19, 2014
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I have an NZXT Phantom full tower case, the RAM has no heat sink and my motherboard is Gigabyte Z97 HD3 would it be compatible?

CPU Cooler clearance is 170mm so it fits in your case.
You have low ram so you should be fine. I don't have the motherboard in front of me to measure. Evo cooler is 120 x 80 x 159 mm.
I am pretty sure you are fine but check it.
 
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M

MalwareBlockerYT

But he's already mentioned temps are fine during the occurring issue. This thread is still stuck in first gear, every suggestion has been the exact same.

I hate to say I told you so... :)

But seriously a basic step is the thermals & that looks like it's the cause here.

Also for a cooler I would recommend things like:

be quiet! Virtually Inaudible Hardware

Any BeQuiet CPU cooler is high quality. Corsair & Coolermaster coolers are fine too.

First please try re-applying your thermal paste & CPU cooler!
 
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Theoretical

Level 2
Aug 7, 2016
55
Update on the situation: Cleaned internals from dust using compressed air, had someone re-do the thermal paste on the heat sink however temperatures on the CPU whilst running the CPU benchmark are still reaching 99 degrees Celsius - 100 degrees Celsius. Is the next step to try a new cooler?
 
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SHvFl

Level 35
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Trusted
Content Creator
Nov 19, 2014
2,338
Update on the situation: Cleaned internals from dust using compressed air, had someone re-do the thermal paste on the heat sink however temperatures on the CPU whilst running the CPU benchmark are still reaching 99 degrees Celsius - 100 degrees Celsius. Is the next step to try a new cooler?
Assuming you didn't overclock then yes. If you overclocked first remove the overclock to see how it behaves and then get a cooler if still needed.
 
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M

MalwareBlockerYT

Update on the situation: Cleaned internals from dust using compressed air, had someone re-do the thermal paste on the heat sink however temperatures on the CPU whilst running the CPU benchmark are still reaching 99 degrees Celsius - 100 degrees Celsius. Is the next step to try a new cooler?
I would suggest that you re-apply the thermal paste & cooler. Then if that fails then buy a new cooler. I'm trying to save you some money but you may have to get a new cooler.
 
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Theoretical

Level 2
Aug 7, 2016
55
Like I have said the thermal paste was reapplied and so was the old cooler and still no change. Why has this started to occur now? the old cool worked fine before.

I have no overclocks.

Temperatures in game now are still low and ran DayZ for more than 30 minutes without any turn off, however in Prime95 (CPU benchmark) temps are still reaching around 100 degrees Celsius.

Before I invest in a new cooler I want to be certain that it is the issue.
 
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nclr11111

Level 6
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Feb 25, 2011
276
Most of the time the problem with stockcooler is that they use "pushpins" and that one of them are not enough attached to the mobo and therefore the heatsink does not have a 100% contact against the CPU. Those coolers are included and constitutes a baseline in cooling. They are ok to cool the cpu if used for browsing and paying the bills but NOT for gaming! They also comes with preapplied coolingpaste that are not known to be top notch... Virtually any 3.d party cooler you buy will outperform it.

If i were you i´d sacrifice some $ and get a new cooler with some decent thermal grease. If not for anything else just to keep the CPU safe. Working at thoose temps will deteriorate it and shorten it´s life!

The CoolerMaster you mentioned is a good entrylevel cooler that will perform wonders compared to the stock one. There are better but not at that price. Also get som good thermal grease like Arctic Silver 5, Arctic MX4 or similar and make sure to apply it according to instructions.

If you have the cash and want the best aircoolers out there i´d go for one of those:
- Phanteks PH-TC14PE
- Noctua NH-D15 or Noctua NH-D14
- BeQuiet Dark Rock Pro 3
- Cryorig R1 Ultimate

If you need to go cheaper:
- CoolerMaster Hyper 212 EVO
- Noctua NH-U9B SE2
- Phanteks PH-TC14S
- Phanteks PH-TC12DX
- Be Quiet Shadow Rock 2
https://www.amazon.com/Phanteks-U-T...1481404169&sr=1-2&keywords=Phanteks+PH-TC12DX
There are many more coolers out there and anything will be a good upgrade compared to your stock so the choice is yours...

As a last suggestion, make sure you have good airflow in your chassi! Maybe you need to invest in one or two more chassifans depending on what your fan setup looks like!?
 
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Theoretical

Level 2
Aug 7, 2016
55
Most of the time the problem with stockcooler is that they use "pushpins" and that one of them are not enough attached to the mobo and therefore the heatsink does not have a 100% contact against the CPU. Those coolers are included and constitutes a baseline in cooling. They are ok to cool the cpu if used for browsing and paying the bills but NOT for gaming! They also comes with preapplied coolingpaste that are not known to be top notch... Virtually any 3.d party cooler you buy will outperform it.

If i were you i´d sacrifice some $ and get a new cooler with some decent thermal grease. If not for anything else just to keep the CPU safe. Working at thoose temps will deteriorate it and shorten it´s life!

The CoolerMaster you mentioned is a good entrylevel cooler that will perform wonders compared to the stock one. There are better but not at that price. Also get som good thermal grease like Arctic Silver 5, Arctic MX4 or similar and make sure to apply it according to instructions.

If you have the cash and want the best aircoolers out there i´d go for one of those:
- Phanteks PH-TC14PE
- Noctua NH-D15 or Noctua NH-D14
- BeQuiet Dark Rock Pro 3
- Cryorig R1 Ultimate

If you need to go cheaper:
- CoolerMaster Hyper 212 EVO
- Noctua NH-U9B SE2
- Phanteks PH-TC14S
- Phanteks PH-TC12DX
- Be Quiet Shadow Rock 2
There are many more coolers out there and anything will be a good upgrade compared to your stock so the choice is yours...

As a last suggestion, make sure you have good airflow in your chassi! Maybe you need to invest in one or two more chassifans depending on what your fan setup looks like!?

I'm using the NZXT Phantom full tower case so it has quite a lot of fans so I think I can say air flow is not the problem but as you say the stock cooler maybe my issue but for some reason I never used to get thermal throttling in the past it worked fine, only recently this issue has started to occur but I will do what I can in terms of getting a new cooler thanks for your advice.
 
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Theoretical

Level 2
Aug 7, 2016
55
I'm starting to think the issue is not due to temperature, just went back on DayZ for within 5 minitues the computer shut off and temperatures were not high they were around 40 -50 degrees Celsius.

I also did my own research and found out that Prime95 test for the cpu produces high temperatures for my specific processor, many people that have the i7 4790K have also experienced this issue and therefore when running Prime95 and checking temps it is not an accurate measure.

I'm not sure if I want to buy a new CPU cooler because I'm not sure if that will for sure fix my problem since the computer is not shutting down at high temperatures so maybe it's a power supply issue?
 
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