Q&A Which security product would you recommend with good privacy out of my list?

Which security product would you recommend with good privacy out of my list?

  • AVG

    Votes: 3 9.4%
  • DrWeb

    Votes: 2 6.3%
  • BullGuard

    Votes: 1 3.1%
  • G-Data

    Votes: 22 68.8%
  • TrendMicro

    Votes: 4 12.5%

  • Total voters
    32

icarus

Level 2
Thread author
Oct 29, 2021
63
i know about f-secure and emsisoft but i want to add more product to my list because there is not only 2 company who respact youre privacy.
AVG
DrWeb
BullGuard
G-Data
TrendMicro
out of that list please help me out Which one is good and Which one is evil:devilish:and not safe.
i search but i see no user do this kind of thread in here.
wish you all good year
(if you are want to rate those product i mention what is youre choice from best privacy to worse)
 
Last edited:

SecureKongo

Level 28
Verified
Top poster
Well-known
Feb 25, 2017
1,702
i know about f-secure and emsisoft but i want to add more product to my list because there is not only 2 company who respact youre privacy.
AVG
DrWeb
BullGuard
G-Data
TrendMicro
out of that list please help me out Which one is good and Which one is evil:devilish:and not safe.
i search but i see no user do this kind of thread in here.
wish you all good year
Based on the the country where those companies are located I'd vote for G-Data which is based in Germany which has quite strict privacy laws.
 

SecureKongo

Level 28
Verified
Top poster
Well-known
Feb 25, 2017
1,702
if you want rate those product i mention what is youre choice from best privacy to bad?
for world wide user because those product not restricted to like a country
I didn't mean that it is restricted to a country. The AV company G-Data is based in Germany so it probably complies with german law no matter in which country you are using their products. I won't make a ranking as I don't know every AV good enough to judge their privacy policy. I'd recommend asking @struppigel if you have any questions about G-Data itself. He is working as a malware analyst at G-Data. :)
 

icarus

Level 2
Thread author
Oct 29, 2021
63
thanks to all of you i leave link to those product privacy page so you can compare them and about f-secure and emsisoft i know those are good at privacy but not all users using them 2 so there is other product out there like f-secure on good side of privacy and people does not know about them i want to make them up for users like my self to choose right one
 

Zorro

Level 8
Well-known
Jun 11, 2019
364
i know about f-secure and emsisoft but i want to add more product to my list because there is not only 2 company who respact youre privacy.
AVG
DrWeb
BullGuard
G-Data
TrendMicro
out of that list please help me out Which one is good and Which one is evil:devilish:and not safe.
i search but i see no user do this kind of thread in here.
wish you all good year
(if you are want to rate those product i mention what is youre choice from best privacy to worse)
Here is some information on this topic, just a little outdated. But, perhaps, nothing has changed since then. https://www.av-comparatives.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/12/avc_datasending_2014_en.pdf

And some more information from another antivirus laboratory.
AV-Test has conducted a thorough analysis of the English-language privacy policies of 26 antivirus programs and provides a comprehensive assessment of the market situation. In fact, only 24 documents were analyzed, because the two antiviruses do not include any privacy policy at all - neither on the manufacturer's website, nor during the installation of the program. In almost every privacy policy researched, the manufacturer assumes a large number of access rights that should not be required when using an antivirus product. Instead, according to vendors, this information is used for product optimization purposes, as well as to adjust the marketing campaign of the developer and partner companies. In each of the analyzed documents, the manufacturer reserves the right to transfer the collected data to third-party companies.

In most cases, the data collected includes your username, email address, and billing information. Vendors are also interested in additional contact information, including phone numbers. This information is probably used to impose additional products and services on the user, but they are not used when the antivirus is running. Among other things, this can be proved by the fact that absolutely all development companies collect this data.

Some vendors allow themselves too much. According to the results of AV-Test analysis, it turned out that some manufacturers are gaining access to biometric data stored on a computer. The testers were perplexed when they discovered that the antivirus program was requesting access to digital fingerprints. It is very difficult to explain how information about the user's gender, activity, race or sexual orientation can help the antivirus work. There may be some enterprising marketers involved. Moreover, if we consider tracking user behavior, then many vendors are generous in this matter - 15 out of 24 manufacturers require access to the browsing history in the browser of their users. Six products request access to their search history. Five companies reserve the right to check email. Only two vendors offer the ability to access the address book. What's more, anti-virus software vendors are also interested in getting user activity data on social networks. One of the development companies reserves the ability to publish posts on behalf of the user. Some other products try to participate in chat sessions, or at least access your chat history.

The simplest explanation for such an extensive collection of device data is to protect the information on the device and the applications installed on it. After all, it is the competence of the antivirus to block malicious programs that disguise themselves as legitimate applications and try to gain access to data. That is why vendors ask for basic information: IP address, device ID, operating system, installed applications. Although it must be admitted, not all of them capture this data, but there are some non-standard requests: GPS coordinates detection (5 developers), WLAN positioning (4 developers). However, this can also be explained by the work of the anti-theft function. However, users should keep in mind that they pay for additional device protection by tracking their own movements. In 10 of the 24 analyzed policies, vendors reserved the right to compile “user statistics”. It is not clear exactly what data is meant: using an antivirus program, using a device, or a collection of completely different data. In this area, as in many other sections, agreement terminology is extremely vague.

The fact that many users ignore the general terms and conditions and privacy policy is not surprising. On the one hand, users can be overwhelmed by the sheer volume of agreement. The average length of the privacy policies tested is 12 pages. Moreover, in many cases, their appearance seems to hint that the manufacturer is not interested in understanding the content of the agreement.

An additional test of the readability of the text and the use of appropriate analytical programs showed that many privacy policies are too complex. In other words, the conventions are incomprehensible to the average user. Long sentences and an abundance of technical terms only complicate the understanding of such a vast amount of information. In addition, most developers cannot unequivocally answer the question of the conditions and duration of data storage. Where is user information stored? How long will this data be kept? What data is transferred to third parties, and who are these partners? Many security vendors have failed to provide a satisfactory answer to these questions in their privacy policies.
 
Dec 12, 2021
132
Here is some information on this topic, just a little outdated. But, perhaps, nothing has changed since then. https://www.av-comparatives.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/12/avc_datasending_2014_en.pdf

And some more information from another antivirus laboratory.
AV-Test has conducted a thorough analysis of the English-language privacy policies of 26 antivirus programs and provides a comprehensive assessment of the market situation. In fact, only 24 documents were analyzed, because the two antiviruses do not include any privacy policy at all - neither on the manufacturer's website, nor during the installation of the program. In almost every privacy policy researched, the manufacturer assumes a large number of access rights that should not be required when using an antivirus product. Instead, according to vendors, this information is used for product optimization purposes, as well as to adjust the marketing campaign of the developer and partner companies. In each of the analyzed documents, the manufacturer reserves the right to transfer the collected data to third-party companies.

In most cases, the data collected includes your username, email address, and billing information. Vendors are also interested in additional contact information, including phone numbers. This information is probably used to impose additional products and services on the user, but they are not used when the antivirus is running. Among other things, this can be proved by the fact that absolutely all development companies collect this data.

Some vendors allow themselves too much. According to the results of AV-Test analysis, it turned out that some manufacturers are gaining access to biometric data stored on a computer. The testers were perplexed when they discovered that the antivirus program was requesting access to digital fingerprints. It is very difficult to explain how information about the user's gender, activity, race or sexual orientation can help the antivirus work. There may be some enterprising marketers involved. Moreover, if we consider tracking user behavior, then many vendors are generous in this matter - 15 out of 24 manufacturers require access to the browsing history in the browser of their users. Six products request access to their search history. Five companies reserve the right to check email. Only two vendors offer the ability to access the address book. What's more, anti-virus software vendors are also interested in getting user activity data on social networks. One of the development companies reserves the ability to publish posts on behalf of the user. Some other products try to participate in chat sessions, or at least access your chat history.

The simplest explanation for such an extensive collection of device data is to protect the information on the device and the applications installed on it. After all, it is the competence of the antivirus to block malicious programs that disguise themselves as legitimate applications and try to gain access to data. That is why vendors ask for basic information: IP address, device ID, operating system, installed applications. Although it must be admitted, not all of them capture this data, but there are some non-standard requests: GPS coordinates detection (5 developers), WLAN positioning (4 developers). However, this can also be explained by the work of the anti-theft function. However, users should keep in mind that they pay for additional device protection by tracking their own movements. In 10 of the 24 analyzed policies, vendors reserved the right to compile “user statistics”. It is not clear exactly what data is meant: using an antivirus program, using a device, or a collection of completely different data. In this area, as in many other sections, agreement terminology is extremely vague.

The fact that many users ignore the general terms and conditions and privacy policy is not surprising. On the one hand, users can be overwhelmed by the sheer volume of agreement. The average length of the privacy policies tested is 12 pages. Moreover, in many cases, their appearance seems to hint that the manufacturer is not interested in understanding the content of the agreement.

An additional test of the readability of the text and the use of appropriate analytical programs showed that many privacy policies are too complex. In other words, the conventions are incomprehensible to the average user. Long sentences and an abundance of technical terms only complicate the understanding of such a vast amount of information. In addition, most developers cannot unequivocally answer the question of the conditions and duration of data storage. Where is user information stored? How long will this data be kept? What data is transferred to third parties, and who are these partners? Many security vendors have failed to provide a satisfactory answer to these questions in their privacy policies.
8 years ago is way too outdated to be relevant, the permissions AV's uses are in no way different to other applications, your browser for example collects an huge amount of data, more than any AV will ever be able to collect, and dont get me started on Operating Systems.

Also, its very easy to misinterpret both the article and privacy policies as the way they expöain the purpose of certain data is used for can be quite vague, and can easily trick people into thinking its some kind of spyware.
 

Zorro

Level 8
Well-known
Jun 11, 2019
364
8 years ago is way too outdated to be relevant, the permissions AV's uses are in no way different to other applications, your browser for example collects an huge amount of data, more than any AV will ever be able to collect, and dont get me started on Operating Systems.
I did not find any other materials on this issue. This topic is about antivirus software. What does browsers and operating system have to do with it? We are talking about antiviruses, not other programs.
Also, its very easy to misinterpret both the article and privacy policies as the way they expöain the purpose of certain data is used for can be quite vague, and can easily trick people into thinking its some kind of spyware.
The mere fact that all privacy policies are very complex and vaguely formulated suggests that they want to get more information from the user than is needed for the simple correct operation of the program, but so that legally everything is not illegal, this is how this agreement is made.
As noted by AV-Test security expert Anette Hoppe: “We have not previously conducted research on this issue. However, at AV-Test we regularly receive inquiries from users who are concerned about suspicious emails or questionable program functions from companies and government agencies, but recently there has been an increase in requests from ordinary users who are concerned about the privacy of their data. In our research, most antivirus software vendors neglect users' trust and often have unjustified access to user data. Some of the data collected is necessary for antivirus software to perform its direct tasks. In comparison, it is very difficult to justify the need to process the user's gender and date of birth. It is very important to distinguish between the data that the manufacturer receives according to the privacy policy and the data that is actually collected. Our research sheds light on the rights that software companies are asking for from consumers".
 

icarus

Level 2
Thread author
Oct 29, 2021
63
this is the same thing i want to make it clear like i know many user install and useing trendicro and other av for me in office i have too much work realated info there are more people like me with too much private information and stuff in there computer so if we use to run full system scan with them is there any chance they like copy or do something like that from file inside our computer?or in there cloud?or when we add drive or folder or file to Exception Lists of those software is there any chance they sneaking those drive or files?
i know most of users maybe think about this(For example I do not mean anything illegal. The details of the people who represent my office and the government details that my office deals with.)or even personal photo or video or doc we have on our computers around the world.

somethings like this i use f-secure on other laptop to test for a week:

Screenshot 2021-12-22 230256.pngScreenshot 2021-12-22 230542.png

like this if you pay attention to location in picture those are my work drive and folder so they adrress it on log is the same log like this uploading to the antivirus server or cloud with all file name and path?

Screenshot 2021-12-22 230821.png