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Coincidentally, I got the notification today that Microsoft is abolishing the Home Use Program (HUP) as we know it.

If your company purchases Microsoft in certain way, employees can get big discounts on Microsoft software.

HUP allowed us to buy Microsoft Office for $10 for life.

Now... it's going to a discounted version of Office 365 where you pay, and pay, and pay.... forever.

Until you die.

The End.
The Claremont colleges have the HUP program for university employee family members.

Microsoft is on a path to eliminating personnel, getting rid of departments and divisions, cutting expenses, and increasing revenue streams. Same as any other shrewd company.

In this day and age, the vast majority of software is far too cheaply priced. The backend costs are huge and retail revenue doesn't cover it.
 
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It looks to me as well that they want the subscription model for everything, I'm not a huge fan tbh, I may well switch to Linux 100% if they do that, even though I like their software.
Annual Windows subscription fees are going to happen. It is simply a matter of time.

The FOSS\Linux community is too fractured to produced good enough distros with the support needed to convince much of anyone to transition to Linux. Fedora and CentOS are as close as you can get to something like Windows, MacOS or Chrome OS.

And we're not even considering such problems as the interfacing with other systems and backwards compatibility.
 

Local Host

Level 18
Verified
This is true indeed. The latest version of ESET broke things too. It's been more than a week I guess but they've yet to fix the issue. WD is more stable in similar regards.
Is not true at least for Kaspersky, they take to time to read Microsoft Documentation and Changelog, also properly test their AV in Preview Builds, if anything only people using Kaspersky Free should bother worrying since it has low priority (even then no major issues have been reported in years, contrary to other well known AV brands).
 

notabot

Level 13
Annual Windows subscription fees are going to happen. It is simply a matter of time.

The FOSS\Linux community is too fractured to produced good enough distros with the support needed to convince much of anyone to transition to Linux. Fedora and CentOS are as close as you can get to something like Windows, MacOS or Chrome OS.

And we're not even considering such problems as the interfacing with other systems and backwards compatibility.
CentOS is mostly aimed at server use, for desktop Ubuntu is quite good and with snap apps, quite secure as well
 
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Is not true at least for Kaspersky, they take to time to read Microsoft Documentation and Changelog, also properly test their AV in Preview Builds, if anything only people using Kaspersky Free should bother worrying since it has low priority (even then no major issues have been reported in years, contrary to other well known AV brands).
Kapsersky products have an incidence of problems that is right in there with most any other software. Kaspersky does not produce bug-free, unproblematic software. And please, do not even try the usual "It's because of what the user did to their Windows system".

Always promoting Kaspersky as the most polished security product is more about personal bias and issues than facts.

Just sayin'. Let's be real. It's software. Not Fabergé eggs.
 
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CentOS is mostly aimed at server use, for desktop Ubuntu is quite good and with snap apps, quite secure as well
Linux is OK for those inclined to use it. However, the user experience isn't that great even for the die-hard enthusiasts. The ones that really, really, really like Linux are those that relish solving problems and are immersed in the whole Linux-geek culture. Or at least part of a sub-culture that relies heavily upon Linux such as pen-testing, malware, and such.

Windows, MacOS and Chrome OS are all built-out to essentially be plug-n-play. That's something Linux will never be able to achieve. At least not in the current circumstances.
 

notabot

Level 13
Linux is OK for those inclined to use it. However, the user experience isn't that great even for the die-hard enthusiasts. The ones that really, really, really like Linux are those that relish solving problems and are immersed in the whole Linux-geek culture. Or at least part of a sub-culture that relies heavily upon Linux such as pen-testing, malware, and such.

Windows, MacOS and Chrome OS are all built-out to essentially be plug-n-play. That's something Linux will never be able to achieve. At least not in the current circumstances.
Not true, it's the most common deployment environment and thus it has also become the most common dev environment. This is not a subculture, it's the mass market out there. Home use is different as is desktop use for the enterprise, both are mostly on Windows but any technology company these days runs mostly on Linux both for their servers and their dev envs
 
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any technology company these days runs mostly on Linux both for their servers and their dev envs
This is definitely not reality. Reality is all over the place. There is no general rule for Linux usage except for a lot of web application servers.

Devs use what they like. In the environment I am in it is popular. However, go other places and Linux isn't used nearly as much. It varies. And I know from using Linux that the experience just isn't that great. Operating systems such as Windows, MacOS and Chrome OS are built-out with much better infrastructure and support.
 
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It is reality
The vast majority of companies won't touch Linux. They use Windows overwhelmingly. The worldwide % market share for Linux is around 3.5 % - and that number includes Chrome OS. The vast majority of that % is university, research and smaller tech companies. Sure, some large corps use Linux, but except for specific use-cases, Linux is not widely used in commerce.
 

Handsome Recluse

Level 21
Verified
Fedora and CentOS are as close as you can get to something like Windows, MacOS or Chrome OS.
Last time I used Fedora, it didn't use swap.
The vast majority of companies won't touch Linux. They use Windows overwhelmingly. The worldwide % market share for Linux is around 3.5 % - and that number includes Chrome OS. The vast majority of that % is university, research and smaller tech companies. Sure, some large corps use Linux, but except for specific use-cases, Linux is not widely used in commerce.
The cheap ones.
 

notabot

Level 13
The vast majority of companies won't touch Linux. They use Windows overwhelmingly. The worldwide % market share for Linux is around 3.5 % - and that number includes Chrome OS. The vast majority of that % is university, research and smaller tech companies. Sure, some large corps use Linux, but except for specific use-cases, Linux is not widely used in commerce.
All big tech is mostly on Linux, most series B and C are on linux, non-tech companies may still be on Windows but when they replenish their stack they'll go with the most developed option. A lot of non-tech, like financials deploy mostly on Linux as well

Linux is above 90% market share on server environment.
Android also uses the Linux kernel.

is that 3.5% you quote from the home desktop market segment only?
 
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All big tech is mostly on Linux, most series B and C are on linux, non-tech companies may still be on Windows but when they replenish their stack they'll go with the most developed option. A lot of non-tech, like financials deploy mostly on Linux as well

Linux is above 90% market share on server environment.
Android also uses the Linux kernel.

is that 3.5% you quote from the home desktop market segment only?
3.5 % is total world use, that includes all operating systems.

Linux is anything but mainstream. It is a specific application operating system, but in any case, OK, you win. This is a debate not worth having.
 

notabot

Level 13
There are a lot of ways to measure market share.... but for most of them -- especially those that are relevant to this forum, Linux is not significant.

This is for laptops/desktops --

View attachment 225021
For the home desktop and enterprise non-dev silo this seems reasonable, it's not not representative of total installations without server and mobile in the picture though.
 
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If it includes mobile and servers, unless the itemization is wrong, I find this number impossible, where's all the android devices in the 3.5% ?
You and I are talking about two different sides of a coin.

Mobile devices not included in that number. We might as well throw-in routers, Kindles, Cadillacs and the hadron collider. Do that and you can safely say that Linux has 90 % market penetration. Yet, still, Linux is not mainstream. OSes like Windows, MacOS and Chrome OS are mainstream.

And that's the debate I don't want to debate - what does "mainstream" mean ?