Serious Discussion AdGuard Blog relaunches news digest

Gandalf_The_Grey

Level 76
Thread author
Verified
Honorary Member
Top Poster
Content Creator
Well-known
Apr 24, 2016
6,683
Not so long ago we released AdGuard v2.5 for Mac, which, among else, made a heavy accent on compatibility with soon-to-come macOS Big Sur. The v2.5.1 patch that followed recently was packed with more compatibility-oriented changes.

I have to say that befriending AdGuard and Big Sur is not a simple task at all. Apple shakes things up really hard this year when it comes to macOS.

First of all, it's because of the deprecation of Kernel Extensions. If you're a frequent reader of our Blog, you probably remember that we mentioned this as early as in March. You can find plenty of information on this topic if you're intrested in digging deeper, but the bottom line is that Kernel Extensions is an API that AdGuard used to rely on in earlier versions, and with Big Sur macOS moves to a new API, and it's very, very different. All internal AdGuard processes had to be rebuilt, accommodating to the new API.

But that's not the only factor. The introduction of Big Sur comes with Apple switching from Intel processors to ARM. As you might guess, it takes its toll as well. Let's take a closer look at both reasons...
Read the rest of this article at AdGuard Blog:
 

Gandalf_The_Grey

Level 76
Thread author
Verified
Honorary Member
Top Poster
Content Creator
Well-known
Apr 24, 2016
6,683
The rapid increase of people's personal data abuse by companies and individuals calls for the creation of some kind of self-defense checklist, and here is ours.

It answers a simple question: what is most important if you don't want to be hurt because someone knows too much about you.

It is not a guide on cybersecurity. It is far from being exhaustive and contains some obvious points. But nothing is forgotten more often than what everyone's sure they know. With that in mind, here are some pieces of advice that will help protect your private sensitive data form being harvested uncontrollably for profit of others:

1. Do not neglect the fundamentals​

You probably brush your teeth twice a day and regularly take a shower, just so that people would be comfortable around you, and you would be comfortable around them. These are hygiene fundamentals that everyone agrees on (hopefully). So make sure you take care of your online hygiene too: take a habit of changing passwords from time to time, at least for critically important websites and services. These include those that have access to your financial information, to your location and everyday routes, home and work addresses, information about your health issues, and so on. But how to choose a new password?

1.1. Basic principles of a good password:

  • Strong. At least 12 characters including numbers and capital letters)
  • Unique. Don't get scared, there are cognitive techniques to generate unique passwords and memorize them without much effort. Alternatively, you can store them in a trustworthy password manager app (also protected by password or biometry).
  • Not written anywhere. Yes, don't be this guy from TV who left a post-it note with all passwords on the monitor and got the entire office hacked.
  • Not put in any forms except for the one made for it. Those "check your password strength" websites are scams. Those "check if your password has leaked" services are most probably scams too. Those fake website pages mimicking real websites are scams (they are called phishing for a reason). It’s okay to use services that check it by an email or by a phone number like Have I been pwned.

2. Use 2-step authentification wherever possible​

Relax, this is not for long. Companies promise us a passwordless future, biometric identification, and blockchain-based digital money that just can not be stolen or lost (not to be confused with cryptocurrencies). It's all going to happen soon, but not tomorrow, and until then you'll have plenty of chances to be hurt in plenty of ways. Escape the dubious honor to be the last person on Earth robbed by cybercriminals and use 2FA with important services (see above the definition of important).

3. Protect your devices with a password and lock them when not in use​

Smartphones, tablets, laptops, desktop computers — what do people do with all these huge amounts of time they spare not locking devices? Most of them can be unlocked with a fingerprint or face ID in a fraction of a second. And yes, if you are in the office and leave your workplace for a short trip to the cooler — lock the computer. Maybe there are no evil hackers around, but you can fall victim to a practical joke or idle curiousity of colleagues. And of course, set up automatic locking after a minute of inactivity.

4. Update your apps and the system​

Most people let software updates live their own mysterious lives, but power users often optimize the updates in order to save battery, traffic, or their own nerves from the cases when Windows demands a restart in the middle of a Zoom meeting (or a Minesweeper game, if the day is slow). Some people switch to manual updates and then forget to run them. They more often fall victim to vulnerabilities found by hackers and spammers that could have been fixed by a postponed update. You do not want to belong to these people.

5. Do not insert USB drives found somewhere into your computer​

It doesn't matter: a personal computer, an office computer. Friend's computer. Enemy's computer (even the enemy might not deserve the consequences).

I just can hear you scream "Oh come on, I'm not five years old"!
You have no idea how many cats curiosity has killed. You will not even need to launch anything from a malicious drive or open any files to get your computer attacked, and even a freshly updated antivirus might not be enough.

5.1 An advice of the same level of obviousness and the same level of public neglect: do not keep Bluetooth, Wi-Fi and geolocation active on your device when you do not need them. Even if you do not care about data, you probably care about battery life. It's just a bad idea to let your device connect automatically to public Wi-Fi networks — most unexpected things can happen that will be exploited by cybercriminals sooner or later.

6. Do not overshare​

Data is the new oil, they say, so why walk around leaking that valuable liquid? Fill only the required fields in the forms. Participate in polls only if you get something for it, and it's worth it. Trade your information, don't gift it. And why actually would a flashlight app on your smartphone ask for the access to your geolocation and contacts? Why a weather forecast app wants access to data storage and camera? I mean, they know what to do with it (spoiler: they'll sell it to advertisers, at best), but what is there for you?

6.1 Delete unused accounts. It is hard to remember everything you've ever signed up to, but at least pay attention to notifications and emails. It is sad in some way: companies try to galvanize you as a customer with their newsletters, and you thank them by leaving and covering your tracks.

6.2 Do not do work stuff at home. Do not do personal stuff at work. Do not do any important stuff in public networks.

If you actually need something done as soon as possible, do it of course. But it is a nice lifehack to zone your activities in time and space, including the digital universe's space and time. Your office network administrator absolutely does not have to know anything about your personal finances, or whom you flirt with on Facebook. And all the shrinks of the world advise to leave your work at work (if in the midst of the pandemic world you are fortunate enough to possess a workplace separated from other places).

At least there is no dispute about public networks. Subway Wi-Fi, park Wi-Fi, cafe Wi-Fi, your neighbors' Wi-Fi — they are all shark pools, or at least you should treat them like that. Use a VPN and avoid passing somehow sensitive information, visit only thoroughly protected websites (Google services are more or less so, a small independent e-commerce website — rather not, if you want an example).

7. Know your rights​

Especially if you are in the EU. Or California. Or China. Or Russia. Do you get the idea?

Countries generally like to protect their citizens, and countries also like to be protected from their citizens. Explore the legislation around data, privacy, and digital services regulation in your country. Find out what you can and can not do. What can and can not be done to you. Ignorantia legis neminem excusat — ignorance of the law excuses no one.

8. Get yourself impressed​

You might change your view on privacy if you find out how much data they harvest and what happens to people because of that. You can start from here.

Or maybe you should request your data gathered by Facebook (you can ask them, and not only them, "what do you know about me") and try not to turn paranoid discovering how much they know about you.

One more way to have a lot of fun: check your advertising preferences, for example, on Facebook or Google. See yourself in the distorting mirror of Zuckerberg's eyes. You can even correct them if they think that you are a COVID dissident, live in a four-store house, or have been to North Korea.

9. Discover handy tools and use them​

VPN, DNS, ad blockers, antiviruses, browser incognito mode, cookie cleaning, private search engines and secure messengers — they are not made for criminals, spies, or celebrities. They are made for and used by real people, the Smiths next door. Browser incognito mode or a VPN can help you escape price discrimination (when airline tickets, hotels, rental cars, and many other things are more expensive for those who are considered by robots to be rich or more in need. An ad blocker saves you from attention draining, fatigue, procrastination, marketing manipulation, spontaneous spending, battery drain, and much more.

Of course, it is crucially important to choose a service provider or a vendor wisely. Use well-known solutions from experienced developers with positive feedback in independent reviews. Download apps only from official app stores and developers' websites (sometimes a mobile app can be downloaded only from a website because, let's say, Google does not allow apps with certain functions to their stores, wink-wink).

10. Give feedback, report violations​

Waste three or four taps, donate a second of your time to charity: report bad ads, spam, scam, bullying, and everything evil (or even just suspicious).

11. Think twice​

This is a good general advice for everyday life. Spontaneous emotional reactions exist to be abused. Don't act on impulse the next time you receive an email from a Nigerian prince.

12. Do not consider yourself protected and invulnerable by default​

If you are neither rich nor stupid, it doesn't mean that your data is not of interest, or that there are no ways to get to it. Your personal information is worth more than you think, and there are people and corporations willing to take it from you.

13. Look after the weaker ones​

Teach your children and your parents the rules of secure web experience that you learnt today (or knew beforehand). By protecting them, you protect yourself, if nothing else.


I really hope that at least some of these pieces of advice will be helpful for you. Even if there's too much to take in at once, start with something small: change your Google password that's been collecting dust for two years, or give VPN a go. Who knows, maybe you'll make a habit of keeping digital hygiene sooner than you'll notice.
 

plat

Level 29
Top Poster
Sep 13, 2018
1,793
Under section 1.1, AdGuard makes the sweeping statement that sites which check leaked passwords "are probably scams.." I don't believe haveibeenpwned has approached the realm of scam-hood (yet), unless I missed some recent development that changed its otherwise good reputation. Far as I know, it hasn't been snapped up by some online kraken like Google yet.

Most of the info here is OK and time tested but also very broad, vague, second-nature and redundant to many around here. Seriously, AdGuard should back-pedal a little bit on that "scam" statement if it wants to retain a measure of my goodwill.
 

Gandalf_The_Grey

Level 76
Thread author
Verified
Honorary Member
Top Poster
Content Creator
Well-known
Apr 24, 2016
6,683
Under section 1.1, AdGuard makes the sweeping statement that sites which check leaked passwords "are probably scams.." I don't believe haveibeenpwned has approached the realm of scam-hood (yet), unless I missed some recent development that changed its otherwise good reputation. Far as I know, it hasn't been snapped up by some online kraken like Google yet.

Most of the info here is OK and time tested but also very broad, vague, second-nature and redundant to many around here. Seriously, AdGuard should back-pedal a little bit on that "scam" statement if it wants to retain a measure of my goodwill.
It's a bit extreme and they say probably for leaked services, but they are okay with HIBP:
  • Not put in any forms except for the one made for it. Those "check your password strength" websites are scams. Those "check if your password has leaked" services are most probably scams too. Those fake website pages mimicking real websites are scams (they are called phishing for a reason). It’s okay to use services that check it by an email or by a phone number like Have I been pwned.
But it is good advice to be careful with those sites, especially the ones you are not familiar with.
Just use the trusted https://haveibeenpwned.com/
 

Gandalf_The_Grey

Level 76
Thread author
Verified
Honorary Member
Top Poster
Content Creator
Well-known
Apr 24, 2016
6,683
When getting ready to commit to a long-term VPN subscription, users most frequently evaluate its speed, security, and price. Those are very important points but there is so much more! There is a baker’s dozen of key assets that make AdGuard VPN unique. Let’s look at each of them separately to see why AdGuard VPN is one of a kind and how to use it to its fullest extent.

To start with, let’s go over AdGuard VPN’s unmatched features that you won’t find in any other VPN.

1. Proprietary protocol
2. Exclusions lists
3. Choosing a DNS server
4. Fastest locations
5. Compatibility with AdGuard ad blocker
6. QUIC support (experimental)
7. Kill Switch
8. Split tunneling
9. Auto-Protection
10. Simultaneous connection allowance
11. Streaming support
12. Torrents support
13. Dark mode

AdGuard VPN is currently available as a desktop app for macOS and Windows, mobile app for iOS and Android, and as a browser extension for Chrome, Firefox, and Edge. Give it a try and feel free to drop us a line about your experience by leaving a review in a relevant app store or joining the discussion on any platform.
Read the whole story on the AdGuard Blog here:
 

Gandalf_The_Grey

Level 76
Thread author
Verified
Honorary Member
Top Poster
Content Creator
Well-known
Apr 24, 2016
6,683
AdGuard Blog: VPN use cases: Tinder tricks, cheaper trips, avoiding risks, and more
What is so special about VPN, you might think. It just masks your location. Of course, it’s good to gain access to something unavailable in your country. Or hide something from those greedy for your personal data for no matter what reasons.

But this “digital immigration”, or rather “IP tourism”, can be handy in unexpected (or at least not yet thought about) ways.

VPN is not just good for spoofing your geolocation for websites and apps that happened not to love the original one. It makes your connection secure and encrypted, saves the sensitive private data from abuse, so it is not only your location that you “hide”. Actually, if you connect to a public Wi-Fi network in a cafe or on the subway, you'd better hide anything you can.

We have hand-picked some of the important use cases where you definitely need a VPN. Let's have a look at them.

How VPN makes your life better: a couple of cases out of so many
1. Shopping abroad
2. Saving money, again: cheaper airline tickets and hotels
3. More content available
4. An escape from corporate slavery into the world of reasonable adults
5. Digital remigration
6. Tinder: more freedom, less money wasted with a VPN
7. Blocked websites
8. Torrents and avoiding the "watch lists"
9. Finally. Security. Again and forever.
Read the whole story on the AdGuard Blog here:
 

Gandalf_The_Grey

Level 76
Thread author
Verified
Honorary Member
Top Poster
Content Creator
Well-known
Apr 24, 2016
6,683
Please welcome our new digest!

As companies find more sophisticated ways to harvest and analyze user data, as governments seek more options to control people's online activities, it's becoming more and more important to keep your eye on the ball and understand what happens around. Awareness, inter alia, may help to raise your voice against controversial innovations just in time.

There were times when we published a monthly digest of industry news that had been covered in our blog, but it didn't catch on. Now we want to experiment with a weekly format. In today's article we collected the recent news from the industry of ad blocking, privacy protection, and Web security, which we consider worthy of your time — and also some of the older news that may have went past you back then but still retain their relevance today.

1. Should you go passwordless just yet?
2. "Facebook Files" revealing all the dark secrets we already suspected about
3. Just reminding you why ads are not good
4. You might be wrong about who's actually eavesdropping on you
Read the full digest on AdGuard Blog:
 

Gandalf_The_Grey

Level 76
Thread author
Verified
Honorary Member
Top Poster
Content Creator
Well-known
Apr 24, 2016
6,683
First off, congratulations. We've won. Well, kind of. Apple officially delayed the implementation of CSAM initiative. The company's statement to the press was in its diplomatically nebulous fashion, but we can dare say, CSAM detection in the way it had been introduced to us was canceled.
Last month we announced plans for features intended to help protect children from predators who use communication tools to recruit and exploit them, and limit the spread of Child Sexual Abuse Material. Based on feedback from customers, advocacy groups, researchers and others, we have decided to take additional time over the coming months to collect input and make improvements before releasing these critically important child safety features.

Common sense has prevailed. For now.​

How much "additional time" — not specified (though certainly not less than "several months"), what "improvements" — not specified either. And no speculations here, as Apple had described the CSAM detection algorithm as almost perfect and flawless, so who knows what they are going to improve.

Everybody was against it. Consumers, activists, human rights advocates, technology and privacy experts, including us. Now we know that we are not just some privacy fetishists, we had our point: CSAM detection had been loaded by risks, threats, and abuse potential.

Of course, it helped a lot that Apple had a big upcoming event this September. A new iPhone was to be announced, and it had been no good to announce it stuffed with a collection of child porn, even if it looked like a bunch of hashes.

Interim steps for terminal disaster​

But not only commercial companies try to get us rid of privacy by appealing to child protection. Governments and international regulatory bodies do it too, and they are not bound by the necessity to think about their profits and balance between gathering more information or gaining control over people, and not scaring customers away.

This summer the European Parliament approved a "temporary regulation" that allows commercial companies that host web-based services to scan users' communications for signs of child abuse without becoming privacy laws violators (specifically, not to risk breaking GDPR rules).
The results showed that 537 members of European Parliament (MEPs) voted in favor of the bill, with 133 against and 24 abstaining. Despite the result, European lawmakers warned that the rules are "legally flawed" and could crumble in front of a court.
MEPs also decried the pressure they were under to approve the bill, calling it "moral blackmail", the press reported.
"Whenever we asked critical questions about the legislative proposals, immediately the suggestion was created that I wasn't sufficiently committed to fighting child sexual abuse," Dutch MEP Sophia in ‘t Veld said a day before the vote.
So it won't be any EU officials to monitor EU users' messages and emails for illegal content (there also had been audio messages in the first edition of the bill, they were omitted in the final one). It would be the commercial companies, service providers that can't fight the desire to protect kids. The initiative had belonged to the European Commission, and the Parliament passed the bill unusually quickly.

The Parliament tried hard to deliver their position via the media. "Service providers should use the least privacy-intrusive technologies possible", they assure us. Do we believe them? Hm.

Not much is explained about how exactly the monitoring is designed and implemented. "Online material linked to child sexual abuse is detected using specific technologies that scan content, such as images and text, or traffic data. While hashing technology helps with images and videos, classifiers and artificial intelligence are used to analyze text or traffic data to detect cyber grooming". — clearly, it's left up to the companies to decide the specifics, and the implementations may vary significantly.

The worst of all​

The new approach to child protection threatens the very existence of encrypted messaging. Back in May, when Facebook announced its plans to add encryption to the Messenger app, the European Commission warned it that this move would turn the social network into "a haven for the pedophiles".

The new rules will be in action for three years. And the permanent legislation that is now being developed to replace them raises even more concerns. Firstly, it demands that encryption technologies allow scanning texts, images, videos in messages, chats, and emails. Secondly, it implies monitoring not only pornography or abuse, but also grooming — the process of building relationships with children in order to exploit them. This is a quite vague definition, and questions are being asked on whether robots would be able to detect it correctly.

Thirdly, now companies scan for child abuse volunteerly, new laws will make it mandatory.

United Europe divides over encryption​

The good news is, officials all over the world have been trying to dig under encrypted messaging for quite a long time by now, but haven't yet found a way to rob us of it. They know all too well it would result in massive outrage and in migration of the actual criminal activity into darknet or less known platforms that are under the radar of regulators. They do not want to kill WhatsApp or even Telegram.

Besides, a united Europe doesn't look so much united when it comes to the opinion on encryption. Privacy is advertised as one of the main values of the European culture and politics. But child protection and the fight against terrorism are as well! No wonder there are signs of some regulatory schizophrenia. Just a few examples:

2017: "A European Parliament committee is proposing that end-to-end encryption be enforced on all forms of digital communications to protect citizens", BBC reports.

2020: "The terrorist attack in Vienna is used in the EU Council of Ministers to enforce a ban on secure encryption for services such as WhatsApp, Signal and many others in the rapid-boiling process. This emerges from an internal document dated November 6th from the German Council Presidency to the delegations of the member states in the Council", directly contradicting the previous statement.

2021: The proposal called for the creation of a "balance" between "security through encryption and despite encryption". The proposal called on EU member states to "join forces with the tech industry" to jointly create this balance, and to define and establish a regulatory framework as well as innovative approaches and best practices to respond to these challenges.

The last sentence of the quote above sounds like a plan for the next 30 years or so. EU institutions usually don't work very fast, especially when there is no consensus between them and with the nation.

"Security through encryption and despite encryption"​

What a beautiful wording. Of course, we can understand the EU's rulers' desire to squeeze between Scylla and Charybdis unscratched. But the wording is just a desperate oxymoron, if we've already turned to loanwords from Greek, the tongue of Europe's mother culture.

There can be no partial encryption. All backdoors and exclusive only-for-the-state-that-only-wants-you-good accesses to sensitive personal data will be abused and will fall into the wrong hands sooner or later (it happens all the time, why are we even wasting letters again on this).

Even if you are (and especially if you are) an absolutely law-abiding citizen, have never blown up a single plane, or offended a single child, there is no reason to become an object of intrusive surveillance. Often performed with the help of contractors that are not employed by a company and not bound by its data management standards. You should not become a victim of people's or algorithms' honest mistakes and false positives; your security, safety, wellbeing, and reputation are not to be threatened.

So do not think that if you live in London or New Deli, you shouldn't be curious about Apple's initiatives on scanning photos of US citizens. It is a global trend. Every government is intended to keep an eye on the people. To watch its little brothers. To correct them when they are wrong and to punish them when they misbehave. The developing technologies create a lot of new benefits and opportunities, risks and threats, but even their creators can't always tell those apart — the technologies develop too fast.

And do not count on the future discovery of the balance or some golden mean between "security through encryption and despite encryption". When in need for security and privacy, choose apps that see full-fledged encryption as an imperative, and user protection as a priority.

 

Gandalf_The_Grey

Level 76
Thread author
Verified
Honorary Member
Top Poster
Content Creator
Well-known
Apr 24, 2016
6,683
When we first introduced AdGuard DNS beta back in 2016, we couldn't imagine how big it would become. It started as a one-server standalone service. Today AdGuard DNS has 14 server locations all over the globe, it processes over 500 billion DNS requests every month, it's an integral part of virtually all AdGuard apps. Not to mention that AdGuard DNS was the first public resolver to support the cutting-edge DNS-over-QUIC protocol (and still is one of only two such resolvers in the world). We love AdGuard DNS, users love AdGuard DNS, how can it get any better than this?

Turns out, it can. One of the unavoidable drawbacks of any public DNS server, especially a blocking DNS server, is the fact that it's not yours. It's configured one way or another, take it or leave it. If a domain is blocked by the server and you'd like it to be the other way — tough luck. Of course, we at AdGuard do our best to only block what needs to be blocked, but there are millions of users and someone is bound to disagree.

For the record, we offer an option of non-filtering AdGuard DNS that doesn't block anthing at all, but that's for from an ideal solution if you want to unblock a domain or two, not all of them.

Of course, there's always a way. For example, there's AdGuard Home — a highly customizable personal DNS server that you can install on your router or VPS to manage traffic of the entire home network in any form or fashion that you find to be the best. The only downside is that it can be a handful in terms of setting up and configuring on your own if you don't have the required tech skills. And this is where the new AdGuard DNS comes into play.

We're about to take it one step further. Very soon you will be able to get your very own private AdGuard DNS server. Yes, it will be yours and yours only to tweak as you wish. Among the options that will be available to you:
  • Block and unblock any domains
This is the most basic, yet also probably the most important thing you gain from your own private DNS server. Being able to control which domains to block is absolutely key. It will work just like with public AdGuard DNS but it is you who makes the decision what to block and what to spare.
  • Add blocklists
If you're using any of the AdGuard ad blocker apps, you're already familiar with the concept of filter lists, or blocklists. For the uninitiated, these are literally the lists of rules according to which certain web elements are blocked. In case of DNS blocklists we're talking about blocking domains instead, but the general principle stays the same.

Rules for DNS blocking can't be as complicated as filtering rules used by regular ad blockers, but there are still plenty of good lists to choose from. Find the ones you like and add them.
  • See request statistics
Where do your DNS requests go? You'll be surprised how much stuff is going on "behind the curtain". The more apps and browser extensions you have, the more information they are sending to their servers. And these servers sometimes belong to the most unexpected companies and are located in the most obscure places.

With AdGuard DNS you'll be able to see which companies those servers belong to and which countries they are located in. Of course, you can view this information for different dates, countries, and even for different devices connected to your DNS server.

Want some extra details? Open Query log that stores even more data about DNS requests processed by your server.
  • Parental control
Parental control is a flexible tool to shield your kids from online content you don't consider suitable for them.

Once again: it is you who decides what's OK for your kids to see and what's over the line. Not only that, you can set it all up in such a way that, for example, social media are only accessible during certain times, or Twitch can't be accessed from the computer dedicated for studying purposes.

"Wait, aren't you just describing AdGuard Home?", you might ask? You're correct that the functionality overlaps a lot between AdGuard Home and private AdGuard DNS. One of the main differences is that with private AdGuard DNS we made the simplicity and convenience our priority. It's so much easier to set it up and manage, it's almost unfair to compare. If AdGuard Home is aimed more towards tech geeks, private AdGuard DNS will be effortless to use even for your grandma.

How to get it?

You may notice that I'm using future tense often. That's intentional: we're still polishing the whole thing up and aren't quite ready to offer it to the public yet. It's going to take a month or two probably, but there's zero doubt it'll happen in the near future. What we are ready to show is the new AdGuard DNS website.

You can tell we're serious about this project if we're putting it on par with AdGuard ad blocker and AdGuard VPN. Not going to pretend, there's not a whole lot to do on the website yet. You can look at some screenshots of the future private AdGuard DNS interface and, most importantly, subscribe to the AdGuard DNS newsletter. If you do, we'll message you at launch and update on other news about AdGuard, should you decide to opt for it. Almost forgot — this website is also the best place to find exhaustive setup guides for public AdGuard DNS servers. Everything from download links to our apps that have AdGuard DNS to guides for manually setting it up on Debian or even Xbox — all in one place.

We're really hyped for the renewed AdGuard DNS. Hopefully, you too share our excitement after reading the article or having a glance at the new website! In that case, don't forget to request the launch notification email, and if you'd like to clarify something about AdGuard DNS, just ask us in the comments or on any social media.
 

About us

  • MalwareTips is a community-driven platform providing the latest information and resources on malware and cyber threats. Our team of experienced professionals and passionate volunteers work to keep the internet safe and secure. We provide accurate, up-to-date information and strive to build a strong and supportive community dedicated to cybersecurity.

User Menu

Follow us

Follow us on Facebook or Twitter to know first about the latest cybersecurity incidents and malware threats.

Top