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Captain Holly

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A ghost crab on St. Augustine Beach

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nicolaasjan

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May 29, 2023
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Found this one in Google Chrome's themes (picture to set on your new tab).
It happens to be only a few kilometers from where I live. :)

[Edit]
History of the polder on Wikipedia (Dutch).
However, the soil consisted mainly of sand and not of fertile clay. When the land was sold, the proceeds were disappointing and several lenders were ruined.
But nowadays much of Dutch tulips grow there. $$$

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vtqhtr413

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In a wide-field view, Webb sees Jupiter with its faint rings, which are a million times fainter than the planet, and two tiny moons called Amalthea and Adrastea. The fuzzy spots in the lower background are likely galaxies “photobombing” this Jovian view. “This one image sums up the science of our Jupiter system program, which studies the dynamics and chemistry of Jupiter itself, its rings, and its satellite system,” Fouchet said. Researchers have already begun analyzing Webb data to get new science results about our solar system’s largest planet.

Data from telescopes like Webb doesn’t arrive on Earth neatly packaged. Instead, it contains information about the brightness of the light on Webb’s detectors. This information arrives at the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI), Webb’s mission and science operations center, as raw data. STScI processes the data into calibrated files for scientific analysis and delivers it to the Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes for dissemination. Scientists then translate that information into images like these during the course of their research. While a team at STScI formally processes Webb images for official release, non-professional astronomers known as citizen scientists often dive into the public data archive to retrieve and process images, too.
 

nicolaasjan

Level 3
May 29, 2023
126
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Space chicken nebula caught in stunning detail
The Running Chicken Nebula has been pictured in never-before-seen detail in a 1.5-billion-pixel image captured by the Very Large Telescope’s (VLT) VLT Survey Telescope (VST) in Chile, operated by the European Southern Observatory (ESO).
The nebula is a stellar nursery. It is home to young stars in the making which emit intense radiation, painting the surrounding hydrogen gas in a pink glow.
Nebulae are interstellar clouds of dust and gas. Many are formed from the remnants of dying stars and are often regions where new stars are born. The James Webb Space Telescope has brought us exquisite new images of the Crab Nebula and Ring Nebula.
Located about 6,500 light-years from Earth in the Centaurus constellation, the Running Chicken Nebula is actually made up of several different regions. The brightest region is called IC 2948. This is where some see the chicken’s head, others its rear end. Honestly, I don’t blame you if you don’t see a chicken at all.
In the centre of the image is the region 2944. It is marked by a bright, vertical structure. Lambda Centauri, a star visible to the naked eye and much closer to us than the nebula itself, is also seen in this part of the picture.
As the young stars in these regions spit out vast amounts of radiation, they carve up the surrounding environment. But some regions, called the Bok globules, withstand the bombardment and can be seen as small, dark pockets of dust and gas dotted around the nebula.
Other regions pictured are Gum 39 and 40 to the upper right, and Gum 41 to the lower right.
The image is a mosaic comprising hundreds of separate frames stitched together.
Published on:
The Running Chicken Nebula
(fullsize original image 3.9GB!)
 

vtqhtr413

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Yosemite National Park, California​

Fancy witnessing a fiery waterfall? The seemingly impossible can be found at this time of year on the eastern side of El Capitan, Yosemite National Park's famous rock face. Horsetail Fall is a seasonal waterfall that flows only when there has been plenty of snowfall, and when temperatures have been warm enough to melt it. For a couple of weeks in February, if skies are clear, water is flowing, and the sun shines at just the right angle, the long, slender waterfall takes on a glowing, flame-hued appearance. Hundreds gather in Yosemite Valley to see this mesmerizing natural spectacle. The phenomenon has earned the moniker 'firefall,' an homage to the historic Yosemite Firefall, a manmade event from the top of the park's Glacier Point that took place between 1872 to 1968. Eventually, park rangers decided that dumping embers over a cliff onto the land below wasn't the brightest idea.
 

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