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HarborFront

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Now come on, take a few breaths before your death and read more carefully, what he is saying is that they wouldn't use any app know to be involved with themselves, exactly the opposite of your assertion. I can only speak for me and I meant I appreciate you in this forum, just take a moment before you respond, guilty myself, no judgment.
Ok, for the time being I believe they are clean
 
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D

Deleted member 178

If I have Cylance or AppGuard software I'll surely defend to my last breath
it is not about pseudo-fanboyism and defend a product, honestly i don't care, if my favorite product became inefficient to me, i will ditch it in a blink of an eye; like i did with Comodo.

The info on Cylance and AppGuard is on the net. So you are implying they are clean with the government agencies? Maybe they are clean now but how about later............?
it doesn't matter if they clean or not, the real question is, as a basic individual, will you be personally hurt by those agencies? i bet you won't.

Tor was funded by the CIA, and i can guarantee you it is more "watched" than Cylance or any other products LOL
 
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Deleted member 178

Anyway coming back on topic, in the past i disliked Cylance for not giving any trials, now thinking with a more corporate-oriented mindset, i can understand their position.
sadly the consumer version we are talking about is still restricted to some countries...
 

cruelsister

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Actually Tor was primarily a Navy and State Department venture. Although to be fair the folks that run Radio Free Europe (the BBG) is Kinda-Sorta a CIA spinoff. Regarding privacy, there is a little issue with exit nodes.
 

Azure

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The info on Cylance and AppGuard is on the net. So you are implying they are clean with the government agencies? Maybe they are clean now but how about later............?
What I'm trying to say is that if they wanted to use a backdoor they would be subtle about it.

At the very least it makes more sense for me for them to backdoor a popular software that nobody knows has connections with the CIA. And not rely on a software, which like you said, you can easily find info about their relationship.
 
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BryanB

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Although to be fair the folks that run Radio Free Europe (the BBG) is Kinda-Sorta a CIA spinoff. Regarding privacy, there is a little issue with exit nodes.
You're leaving a lot to my old imagination and I'm just about to go to bed and would like to sleep tight, speak your piece Sister.
 
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509322

So, Cylance and AppGuard are no difference in anyway.....having links to CIA/government agency personnel?
Yes. We have ex-CIA and other government types on the board and\or on staff. It's been that way for decades.

I'd like to point out that we have users across China. No backdoor nor spying reported by them.

The last time I checked, the Chinese private sector as a whole has among the deepest, widest and most intense relationships with a home government than any other place in the world. That is no crime, it isn't de facto proof of anything. However, if the Chinese government wished - it could force all Chinese digital device and software manufacturers to implant surveillance and malicious software. But why would it do that - as it would essentially kill the nation's largest trade sector in one fell swoop once they were found out - and that wouldn't take long ? But there are those that routinely promote "Do not buy Chinese software\devices because of blah, blah, blah...". Such is the conspiracy\privacy nuttiness.

Not saying that they can't. But if they wanted to backdoor a software I imagine they would focus on one which the general public doesn't know they have funded or have contacted the developer.
No backdoor in AppGuard. Putting a backdoor in a product places the entire revenue stream for that product in jeopardy. If someone discovers the backdoor they will likely report it. And once the presence of a backdoor is definitively established and openly reported, everyone will avoid the product like the plague and the company will almost certainly go bankrupt.

Same goes for Cylance. Cylance is in the business of making money for its executives and not spying.

The info on Cylance and AppGuard is on the net. So you are implying they are clean with the government agencies? Maybe they are clean now but how about later............?
See above. There is always baseless conspiracy theory nonsense that gets promoted on the forums. Not to mention ex-CIA and government officials work for Google, Microsoft, Linux distro projects, Oracle, Apple, IBM, Android projects, and so on, and so on, and so on... and all those people are not out to hack-spy the world because they once worked for a government agency.
 
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Gov agencies guys are like everybody, they need money for a better life, and we all know how the govs pay their employees...with peanuts...
those guys get high training in their agencies, then offer it for the private sector which pay way better.
 
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BryanB

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But it still doesn't mean these products are sinister, probably the opposite, more insightful, contemporary.
 
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509322

But it still doesn't mean these products are sinister, probably the opposite, more insightful, contemporary.
Corruption and wrong-doing happens everywhere... from the street corner to the highest levels of institutions of all kinds in every nation, city, and village. It's a broad generalization that most anyone would say is undeniable fact (except for North Korean citizens - they could never say such a thing about their nation). Some people curiously find ways to make that generalization apply specifically to just about everything... like the government puts drugs in our drinking water to control us and PCs are the result of alien technology clandestinely developed by the government. Those people are called conspiracy theorists and ancient alien astronaut theorists.
 
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Kubla

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Anyway coming back on topic, in the past i disliked Cylance for not giving any trials, now thinking with a more corporate-oriented mindset, i can understand their position.
sadly the consumer version we are talking about is still restricted to some countries...
It does make one wounder of those countries it is restricted to are the same ones that are part of multilateral UKUSA Agreement (Five Eyes) in other words free to spy on?
 

cruelsister

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Guys!!!! Come On!!! I hope all here know that Government contracts are lucrative as they overpay for stuff (after all, they aren't spending THEIR money, only OURS). If you are running a business that has the capability of securing such contracts you would seek out and hire Washed Up Old Fools that formerly worked for Government Agencies, and although now retired, still have contacts still working at various Agencies in abundance. I mean, why go through the trouble of filling out competitive Bid forms if you can just tell this guy to call up an Old Buddy?

And Secret Stuff here: Although Lockdown is being coy about it, I've heard that AppGuard has a Triple Secret Government contract from the ACA (DON'T even ASK what those letters stand for!!!!! THEY ARE WATCHING...) to reprogram the Main Computers on Alien Starships (probably from Zog; aren't they all...).
 

Slyguy

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Regarding privacy, there is a little issue with exit nodes.
Not only exit nodes. Ultrasonics, Quantum Injection, Ambient EMF harvesting, frequency piggybacking (get those ferrite chokes out), 60Hz harmonic variance parsing, blah blah blah. Certainly if they want to spy on some (or many) they have a plethora of available tools, techniques and protocols (some of which are decades ahead of common man knowledge). However, it's pretty well known they go for the low hanging fruit, which is often software, or aspects involved with that software. (even Angry Birds wasn't immune) Security software is a fantastically rich piece of low hanging fruit because of it's intimacy on your system.

The ferocity at which anyone questioning or discussing concerns about this is relegated to conspiracy theorist or tin foil hat nutter is pretty revealing, by the way. :emoji_popcorn:
 

ticklemefeet

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I couldn't allow or quarantine anything in the online dashboard I had no privileges, and exiting Cylance just shut down the little desktop dashboard app.
The company I was buying Cylance Protect was Malware Managed MSSP Managed Security Solutions
It was 60 bucks a year and They gave me my own web portal where I could unflag the FP's all files they flagged as suspicious were listed on that portal. And so home users have been able to get CP for a few years, just not from Cylance them selves. There might not be a trial but they do have a 30 money back guarantee.

Edit: I just checked the link I osted and could not see where they are offering Cylance. They seem to be offering SentinelOne EPP instead.
 
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D

Deleted member 178

Now that we are done with the conspiracy subject, the real questions are :

- who here are using the consumer version?
- is it light on system (not just CPU & RAM but also i/o read and write) compared to ESET?
- is it good at detection?
- how many FPs on a classic system (dont tell me about your obscure sofwtare, but more about system processes being wrongly flagged)?

honestly, i don't care it is made from CIA, KGB, S.H.I.E.L.D or Hydra. i need a technical review.
 

Robbie

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Now that we are done with the conspiracy subject, the real questions are :

- who here are using the consumer version?
- is it light on system (not just CPU & RAM but also i/o read and write) compared to ESET?
- is it good at detection?
- how many FPs on a classic system (dont tell me about your obscure sofwtare, but more about system processes being wrongly flagged)?

honestly, i don't care it is made from CIA, KGB, S.H.I.E.L.D or Hydra. i need a technical review.
I will check this on the conference with the engineer next week. I was told I will be given a trial license (we're talking about coporate version which is kind of the same protection) to test it. As far as they went, false positives are rarely seen since it's AI and not some behaviour component. The sales representative (highlight sales) said that differing from 1st-gen products, Cylance had around 99.2% of detection rate. This number, of course, shall not be taken as AV-Comparatives numbers which point Microsoft detects 100% of malware samples lmao. As for consuming, they use a 30mb math algorithm and work either online and offline. This triggered me because I supossed that everything working locally would be heavy but apparently it's much lighter than other commercial products. Nevertheless, this I shall test when I have the trial license. If you have any technical questions you want me to throw to the engineer just drop em.
 
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