Do you like Linux Mint?

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Raiden

Level 17
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Linux cannot compete with Windows in ease of use, there are things that are difficult in Linux, so I do not recommend abandoning Win and using only Linux, unless you are a Linux expert.
But there are also cases in which users who by simple mistake abandon Linux.
Exactly

I was trying to leave windows completely, but in all honesty it's not really practical IMHO. I'll more than likely have a dual boot setup where linux is my main distro, but I'll still have Windows for things like gaming and the odd application/tasks that I need windows for. You dont realize/appreciate the nice automated detection/setup that windows does. It's something that isnt quite there on linux just yet.

They can compete with them. It's just people are used to the Windows way and everyone forces you to use Windows anyway.
That's just it.

It's why people gravitate towards KDE over gnome and others because it closer to the windows UI. I like KDE very much, but I can see why some dont like gnome as it's not like the windows UI.
 

bribon77

Level 33
Verified
Exactly

I was trying to leave windows completely, but in all honesty it's not really practical IMHO. I'll more than likely have a dual boot setup where linux is my main distro, but I'll still have Windows for things like gaming and the odd application/tasks that I need windows for. You dont realize/appreciate the nice automated detection/setup that windows does. It's something that isnt quite there on linux just yet.
This is what I've been doing for a long time, ever since the first Ubuntu distributions that shipped CDs home by mail. :)
 

shmu26

Level 85
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Exactly

I was trying to leave windows completely, but in all honesty it's not really practical IMHO. I'll more than likely have a dual boot setup where linux is my main distro, but I'll still have Windows for things like gaming and the odd application/tasks that I need windows for. You dont realize/appreciate the nice automated detection/setup that windows does. It's something that isnt quite there on linux just yet.



That's just it.

It's why people gravitate towards KDE over gnome and others because it closer to the windows UI. I like KDE very much, but I can see why some dont like gnome as it's not like the windows UI.
Maybe not for gaming, but a lot of things you need Windows for can be done in a virtual machine. This assumes your system has the resources to support a VM, of course.
Windows running in a VM generally has less issues, because it doesn't have to deal with your hardware. VirtualBox handles the hardware for it.
I sort of switch back and forth at whim between Windows and Linux, but I don't really need Windows on-the-metal except for certain maintenance tasks that are easier on Windows. Other than that, my VM does the job.
 

Raiden

Level 17
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Maybe not for gaming, but a lot of things you need Windows for can be done in a virtual machine. This assumes your system has the resources to support a VM, of course.
Windows running in a VM generally has less issues, because it doesn't have to deal with your hardware. VirtualBox handles the hardware for it.
I sort of switch back and forth at whim between Windows and Linux, but I don't really need Windows on-the-metal except for certain maintenance tasks that are easier on Windows. Other than that, my VM does the job.
Yes I am contemplating which route to go. For me in think it's going to depend on which system names using. For my gaming rig, I'll more than likely use dual boot so it can have direct access to the hardware. Another option is VFIO which is a VM, but you all the VM to have physical access to certain hardware. Compared to dual boot, it like running a VM, but its harder to get working and you need things like 2 GPUs and such. So dual boot is much easier by comparison.

I am planning to build a new gaming rig later this year, or next and it will be either a ryzen 9 3950x, or the newer version released later this year, I'm assuming 4950x?
 

bribon77

Level 33
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Yes I am contemplating which route to go. For me in think it's going to depend on which system names using. For my gaming rig, I'll more than likely use dual boot so it can have direct access to the hardware. Another option is VFIO which is a VM, but you all the VM to have physical access to certain hardware. Compared to dual boot, it like running a VM, but its harder to get working and you need things like 2 GPUs and such. So dual boot is much easier by comparison.

I am planning to build a new gaming rig later this year, or next and it will be either a ryzen 9 3950x, or the newer version released later this year, I'm assuming 4950x?
Using VM is a good idea, but if you have a powerful PC, (not my case)
So I use a dual boot, I have three Operating Systems, Windows and MX Linux on one Disk, and on another Debian Disk.
 

The Cog in the Machine

Level 23
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I have many devices running Windows 10 Pro. I am using Elementary OS on my HP laptop (without dual boot. Only Linux). I have done that to learn and give Linux a shot. I am doing just fine. I have created a notebook on my Evernote where I jot down new things I learn. I do understand that I have been lucky that Linux worked out of the box on my hardware. Some people with odd (or not so famous) hardware configuration are not as lucky.
Regarding Manjaro, I have watched some Youtube videos and it seems that it is not for me. For the current time I will continue using Ubuntu and Ubuntu-based distros.

I use this HP laptop for University stuff. Word and Powerpoint stuff. EOS is more than enough. I have got everything I need (Libreoffice, Softmaker Office, Thunderbird, Mendeley, XDM, Koofr and Mega Sync). No issues and no hassles. I believe the whole thing depends on the user needs.
 

shmu26

Level 85
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I have many devices running Windows 10 Pro. I am using Elementary OS on my HP laptop (without dual boot. Only Linux). I have done that to learn and give Linux a shot. I am doing just fine. I have created a notebook on my Evernote where I jot down new things I learn. I do understand that I have been lucky that Linux worked out of the box on my hardware. Some people with odd (or not so famous) hardware configuration are not as lucky.
Regarding Manjaro, I have watched some Youtube videos and it seems that it is not for me. For the current time I will continue using Ubuntu and Ubuntu-based distros.

I use this HP laptop for University stuff. Word and Powerpoint stuff. EOS is more than enough. I have got everything I need (Libreoffice, Softmaker Office, Thunderbird, Mendeley, XDM, Koofr and Mega Sync). No issues and no hassles. I believe the whole thing depends on the user needs.
If you are using an office program such as the ones you mentioned, there are sometimes formatting issues when you export it to Microsoft format, and open it in MS Office. So it's best to check your doc before you submit it to your professor. You can open it in Office Online, and then you will know how it will look when your professor opens it...
 

The Cog in the Machine

Level 23
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If you are using an office program such as the ones you mentioned, there are sometimes formatting issues when you export it to Microsoft format, and open it in MS Office. So it's best to check your doc before you submit it to your professor. You can open it in Office Online, and then you will know how it will look when your professor opens it...
You pointed out a very important point. I have been working on a 67-slide presentation which is due today by midnight. I have used Libreoffice and I need to check it right now in Office online. Do I need to export it to MS format?
 

shmu26

Level 85
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You pointed out a very important point. I have been working on a 67-slide presentation which is due today by midnight. I have used Libreoffice and I need to check it right now in Office online. Do I need to export it to MS format?
I assume that you will submit it in MS format. If so, convert it now, and open it in MS Office, preferably in the Office version you think that the university uses. Office 2010 and earlier renders a little differently than the newest versions. It just depends how picky and perfectionist you are. Most people would not worry at all about the Office version, but there are some minor differences.
 

shmu26

Level 85
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Actually, I would worry a little about the Arabic diacritic marks. Maybe you call it Hamza? Not sure what you call it, but an older version of MS Office might render them differently. It also depends a lot on the font, and how the font is rendered by Windows. Some fonts do not render diacritics very well.
 
I hate Ubuntu. But not because of itself. OS is actually really good and one of most widely used distros which helps support, but the Gnome interface they are using is so horrible to use and wastes so much screen estate I puke in my mouth every time I see or use it.

Good alternative is Linux Mint with its Cinnamon desktop which is very minimalistic and usable. But I prefer Kubuntu even more. Kubuntu uses same core as Ubuntu, but has KDE desktop on top. Some don't like it, but it feels more familiar and just more smart by design than weird, clumsy and wasteful Gnome with its moronic empty statusbar on top and big app launcher bar on side (or wherever you put it).

So, Kubuntu has all the perks of Ubuntu, but with better desktop interface. Give Kubuntu a try and you'll see how much better it is.
Ubuntu with gnome 2 was best Ubuntu. Once they start forcing Unity (around 2011 i think) everything went downhill. Unstable and full of bugs.
But i agree, gnome 3 is worst thing that happened to linux
 

shmu26

Level 85
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Ubuntu with gnome 2 was best Ubuntu. Once they start forcing Unity (around 2011 i think) everything went downhill. Unstable and full of bugs.
But i agree, gnome 3 is worst thing that happened to linux
I hate to admit it, but apps freeze for me on Ubuntu gnome. Happens too often. I went back to MX19 Xfce, even though less eye-candy there. I once saw a poster who said that he is not so crazy about Xfce, but it is the only desktop that didn't piss him off. Well said, IMHO
 

Raiden

Level 17
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Content Creator
In regards to Gnome I have to admit that I actually like it. I didn't at first, I was like what the heck is this, but to be honest after I watched some videos and played around with it my opinion changed. I really like KDE, they have done a great job with plasma, but I think why it and others are so preferable is the simple fact that they mimic Windows. So if you're use to the Windows UI, Gnome is going to be like a what they heck to you. Granted there are some strange things like no maximize/minimize buttons by default, many of those things can be fixed by using Gnome tweaks. Some distros like Manjaro for example already have those tweaks on by default, so one could use one of those distros if they want to use Gnome and not have to figure out how to change things.

I'll be honest after getting use to Gnome I can see what they are trying to achieve. Its cleaner and way more simpler then what most people are use to. I go back to KDE and Windows and I just find the task bar way to cluttered and honestly I dont like it as much anymore, I much prefer the cleaner simpler look and feel of Gnome. I added the dash to panel extension to get that Windows UI feel and it's a nice compromise for those who want to use Gnome, but want that Windows UI feel.

At the end of they day one of the great things about linux is you have choice. While it can be bad at times by having too much choice, it's nice to have if you want it. Don't like Gnome use KDE, don't like either of those try XFCE, etc... Everyone will have different needs and wants, so pick the one that works for you the most.
 

The Cog in the Machine

Level 23
Verified
If you create bootable usb by formating it in FAT32 by Rufus then it would work with secure boot enabled but if you format it in NTFS then it would require you to disable secure boot before installation. This is a known issue of Rufus because it uses a bootloader which is open source and safe but Microsoft only trust their own bootloader that's why the term "secure boot" is used. Even though Rufus is faster than anything out there and you can manually enable secure boot later but still I don't recommenced Rufus to anyone anymore because of this extra hassle. There's no need to format your usb drive to FAT32 or disable secure boot only for Rufus. You can try other alternative tools. Microsoft has their own tool for this. It hasn't been updated in 11 years, maybe because it doesn't require any updates. It works perfectly fine for any system Legacy or UEFI (y)
I did create a bootable USB drive with this tool but, unfortunately, it does not support Secure Boot and neither does Rufus. It seems that I will download Windows using the media creation tool.
 

SeriousHoax

Level 29
Verified
Malware Tester
I did create a bootable USB drive with this tool but, unfortunately, it does not support Secure Boot and neither does Rufus. It seems that I will download Windows using the media creation tool.
Maybe there was something wrong because I installed Windows 10 with secure boot enabled just a week ago after creating bootable usb with this tool. Did many times before that also.
Anyway here's another simple yet effective tool:
 
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