Which VPN would you recommend?

  • CyberGhost VPN

    Votes: 22 9.2%
  • Nord VPN

    Votes: 44 18.4%
  • F-Secure Freedome VPN

    Votes: 23 9.6%
  • ExpressVPN

    Votes: 35 14.6%
  • OkayFreedom VPN

    Votes: 4 1.7%
  • Hide My Ass VPN

    Votes: 2 0.8%
  • PureVPN

    Votes: 6 2.5%
  • TorGuard VPN

    Votes: 4 1.7%
  • IPVanish VPN

    Votes: 3 1.3%
  • Other (Specify in thread)

    Votes: 96 40.2%
  • Total voters
    239

SerialCart

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Just in case you are interested in HMA VPN, here is a good offer:

;)
I'm with the Pure VPN. But I also want to try HMA (Hide My Ass) as well.
 

cliffspab

Level 3
Just in case you are interested in HMA VPN, here is a good offer:

;)

I had HMA installed a while ago. It turned out to be the reason my system was making hundreds of calls to an avast URL that I noticed when I checked my NextDNS logs. It wasn't even running at the time, just the Windows service.

I'm now pretty sceptical about the product, to be honest.
 

SerialCart

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Considering AVAST's past this is possible.

However, do not forget that HMA is really a good OpenVPN service. That means you can always use an another OpenVPN client and not the default HMA client software.

Personally this is how I was using this VPN:

Or you can also set it in your router (if it supports OpenVPN).


Now I am using my own VPN server powered by OPNSENSE (a Hardened BSD/pfSense distro) and F-Secure Freedom VPN but TBH HMA was also very good.
 
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Arequire

Level 26
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Content Creator
I have been searching for the difference between a VPN vs Proxy. What is the major difference between 2 of them?
Proxies simply swap your IP address for the proxy servers', and don't encrypt the traffic between your system and server.
They're also generally used on a per application basis, instead of system-wide.

VPNs also swap your IP but they encrypt the traffic (and DNS requests) between your system and the VPN server, which stops your ISP from storing a record of the sites you visit.
They're also usually used system-wide, although some offer split tunneling which allows you to choose specific applications whose traffic gets tunneled through the VPN while all other traffic goes directly to your ISP.
 

blacksheep

Level 4
Considering AVAST's past this is possible.
However, do not forget that HMA is really a good OpenVPN service. That means you can always use an another OpenVPN client and not the default HMA client software.
Personally this is how I was using this VPN:
Or you can also set it in your router (if it supports OpenVPN).
Now I am using my own VPN server powered by OPNSENSE (a Hardened BSD/pfSense distro) and F-Secure Freedom VPN but TBH HMA was also very good.

No. HMA is horrible VPN provider same goes with Avast. They keep log VPN Providers Mull 'Fraudster' Database In Wake of Lulzec Fiasco * TorrentFreak
Also look how much Avast disclose information Transparency report
 

Stopspying

Level 10

SerialCart

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If you are really concerned regarding your privacy, I would recommend contact the support of our sister company and ask for a personal VPN server. They deploy the VPN servers based on pfSense and OPNSense which are the distros of FreeBSD. I got one for myself and the price is relatedly low compared to other VPN solutions. There are only two downsides: 1- You will have only one IP address (per server). 2- NetFlix and similar services would not work as the servers have commercial dedicated IPs).

But the great and important advantages are:

1- The privacy: You will be in control of your own data.
2- You will be in control: you can create user names, self-signed certificates for encrypting the connections, usage of IPv4/v6.
3- Easy to use web panel (for medium to advanced users)
4- Additional plugins specially for OPNSense. You can install antiviruses with different signatures and even you can install SpamAssassin (AiONETS does not support plugins and you will be in charge of this).

their website: AiONETS | Cloud Hosting, SSL Certificates & Cloud Servers
 

SerialCart

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Is it better to use multiple VPN providers? (not at the same time)
It definitely is better, but you would need to have a network of servers, and you can add several OpenVPN profiles to your client software. But it would definately increase the cost as for each IP you would need a server. That is why I am using both. For example when you are intending to do non-important browsing use one of the available solution and for important browsing for example online banking or something which is more important to you, use your personal VPN server.
 

HarborFront

Level 55
Verified
Content Creator
You could do either. Compartmentalization (using different VPNs for different uses), or nested VPN chains (chaining multiple into each other). Nested VPN chains take advanced setup. Neither are something I've ever needed or bothered with.
Nested VPN chain use different VPN providers as opposed to cascading which uses the VPN servers from the same provider.

Both don't require elaborate setup

At home, normally, I use double-hop VPN from different providers for my laptop connection to WiFi

VPN1 (router) => VPN2 (laptop)

If I use VM then I'll either connect

VPN1 (router) => VPN2 (laptop) or
VPN1 (router) => VPN3 (virtualbox)

I've tried using 3 different VPN providers (sparingly as it does affects the speed) as below.

VPN1 (router) => VPN2 (laptop) => VPN3 (virtualbox)

Read below

 
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blackice

Level 28
Verified
Nested VPN chain use different VPN providers as opposed to cascading which uses the VPN servers from the same provider.

Both don't require elaborate setup

At home, normally, I use double-hop VPN from different providers for my laptop connection to WiFi

VPN1 (router) => VPN2 (laptop)

If I use VM then I'll either connect

VPN1 (router) => VPN2 (laptop) or
VPN1 (router) => VPN3 (virtualbox)

I've tried using 3 different VPN providers (sparingly as it does affects the speed) as below.

VPN1 (router) => VPN2 (laptop) => VPN3 (virtualbox)

Read below

I would call the process and requirements elaborate for the average computer user (not meaning average joe and grandma who will never even think about this). You have to have a router that can be a VPN client and know how to set that up. Then if you use a virtual box you have to be familiar with that. It’s not too difficult to learn, but even a lot of people on this forum aren’t super familiar with their routers and networking. I would, however, agree that if you decide to go that route it is not hard to learn. @HarborFront you might be one of the best people here to educate us all on the process.
 

HarborFront

Level 55
Verified
Content Creator
I would call the process and requirements elaborate for the average computer user (not meaning average joe and grandma who will never even think about this). You have to have a router that can be a VPN client and know how to set that up. Then if you use a virtual box you have to be familiar with that. It’s not too difficult to learn, but even a lot of people on this forum aren’t super familiar with their routers and networking. I would, however, agree that if you decide to go that route it is not hard to learn. @HarborFront you might be one of the best people here to educate us all on the process.
Frankly, I learnt most of the things from the net. Of course sometimes I asked some questions and read others' postings here and elsewhere.

No secret in that. Anything I know I can answer. Anything I don't I can't
 

SerialCart

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I would call the process and requirements elaborate for the average computer user (not meaning average joe and grandma who will never even think about this). You have to have a router that can be a VPN client and know how to set that up. Then if you use a virtual box you have to be familiar with that. It’s not too difficult to learn, but even a lot of people on this forum aren’t super familiar with their routers and networking. I would, however, agree that if you decide to go that route it is not hard to learn. @HarborFront you might be one of the best people here to educate us all on the process.
Using virtual machines and multi-VPN is great, however, you can also use two or three pfSense/OPNSense to have the same effect. It might need a little bit more understanding and experience in network configurations but you can definitely learn it.

In OPNSense you can even tunnel to an another server and so on.

Possibilities are numerous, but the question is for what reason. For watching youtube or Netflix? or to work with more sensitive data or for more sensitive tasks like server administration.

I believe as I mentioned be fore for such tasks using pfSense or OPNSense is the best as these two are firewalls with VPN (OpenVPN and IPSec) capabilities. The reason that I insist on these two is that it has a more or less straight forward web interface which medium-level users would be able to easily use them. And they come with very user-friendly user management and a good compatibility (even with LDAP).

If your purpose is to use Netflix and such, definitely these VPNs are not for you.
 
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