Q&A Windows 10 has a built-in ransomware block, you just need to enable it

Opc9

Level 7
Aug 2, 2020
304
Found these articles surprising, I was aware of Controlled folder access for years and it seems many windows users were not. Since the Windows OS has the highest amount of Ransomware attacks globally it maybe a good idea to have this protection feature enabled.

Windows 10 comes with its own baked-in antivirus solution called Windows Defender, and it is enabled by default when setting up a new PC. At the very least, that affords you some basic protection against the many malware threats out in the wild. But did you know there is an added optional layer that can keep your pictures, videos, work documents, and other files safe in the event of a ransomware infection? The caveat is that you have to manually enable ransomware protection in Windows 10.

Or more specifically, a feature called 'Controlled folder access.'

A big hat-tip to Forbes for pointing this out, because this is not something I was aware existed. To enable it, type 'Ransomware protection' in the Windows search bar, or take the long way by navigating to Settings > Update & Security, click on Open Windows Security, click on Virus & threat protection, then scroll down and click on Manage ransomware protection.

Are you protected? Windows ransomware protection basics


Unbeknownst to many consumer users of Windows, Microsoft offers built-in ransomware protection as part of Windows Defender, found under Virus & Threat Protection.

RSW 2021.jpg
 
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upnorth

Moderator
Verified
Staff member
Malware Hunter
Jul 27, 2015
4,372
did you know there is an added optional layer that can keep your pictures, videos, work documents, and other files safe in the event of a ransomware infection
Might seem cherry picking for some, but it's actually very important. Safe, is a incorrect word! The word " safer " is what this extra layer will add to a system/machine. Huge difference because it don't exist any 100% Bullet proof solutions/tweaks etc. Not turn on and using the machine is though pretty safe. 🙃

The OneDrive enable and setup advice I for sure agree with.
 

monkeylove

Level 6
Mar 9, 2014
263
One possible reason why it is turned off by default is because many users may have difficulty figuring out why they're unable to access their documents, etc., and company will be swamped by complaints.

It's also possible that at some point malware developers might be able to develop software that might be similar to those considered safe by the OS and then access protected folders that way.

Given that, the company will have to work harder on its security program to deal with both issues, and more.
 

Spawn

Administrator
Verified
Staff member
Jan 8, 2011
21,129
With me OneDrive is not relevant, I have several TB of lossless music (painstaking ripped over many weeks) & 16 years of Photographs - Multiple external drives is the only backup option & protection against ransomware.
You may still be able to utilise Controlled Folder Access by adding the external drive locations to the Protected folders. The next time you connect the drives, those drives should remain protected.

Have not tested to confirm.

The OneDrive enable and setup advice I for sure agree with.
Unfortunately, OneDrive's Ransomware detection and recovery requires a subscription after the first attempt.
 
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