Spawn

Administrator
Verified
Staff member
🏡 HEY

  • a @HEY.com address
  • Built-in workflows
  • Apps for every platform
  • Spy pixel blocking
  • 100GB storage space
  • Privacy, guaranteed
  • No ads in HEY
  • No tracking in HEY
  • No data selling by HEY
  • No lock-in with HEY
  • No big tech running HEY
  • No peeking by HEY
“Free” email like Gmail isn’t free — you pay by giving up your privacy and valuable personal data. That’s expensive. Since we’re not in the privacy invasion business, we charge a flat, all‑inclusive $99/year for HEY. That’s reasonable.
In any case, I’m sorry to report that it’s time to consider getting a new email address. The reason is Hey, a new email service from Basecamp. It’s a genuinely original take on messaging that feels like the first interesting thing to happen to email since clever apps like Mailbox and Sparrow repurposed your Gmail account, and it’s available in an open beta starting today. With a $99-a-year price tag and some pungent opinions about how email should work, Hey is not for all or even most people. But if you find yourself chafing at the stagnation of Gmail and Outlook, or are just looking for a way to screen out most people who would ever send you a message, Hey is well worth considering.
Source: Hey is a wildly opinionated new email service from the makers of Basecamp
 

Spawn

Administrator
Verified
Staff member
Did you already test them with e.g. the tools from email security & privacy thread?
There is a free trial available should you wish to test the tools yourself.

99$ is reasonable for the price of privacy. You can't expect to get everything for free..
 

security123

Level 20
99$ is reasonable for the price of privacy. You can't expect to get everything for free..
I don't expect it's free. But I pay only 12€/ year for my Posteo account which is build with privacy.

That's why I ask if you already test their service. Mostly no account is needed but I will test them at weekend. Thanks for the trial info
 

Spawn

Administrator
Verified
Staff member
That's expensive. Tutanota premium costs only 12 euros and it's truly privacy minded mail provider.
Not really, Tutanota is €12 for 1 GB, or €120 for 100 GB. Avid email users know storage gets used up fast, especially with attachments and such.
 

blacksheep

Level 3
Not really, Tutanota is €12 for 1 GB, or €120 for 100 GB. Avid email users know storage gets used up fast, especially with attachments and such.
My previous main Gmail account never went over 5GB. The only attachments I get are orders from shops or travel docs, which I don't need to storage over a year and weight a little. Thus I rarely use my email to communicate with people.

If you keep your inbox tidy, 1GB is more than enough for regular user.
 

TairikuOkami

Level 27
Verified
Content Creator
No. Teengers, who would be willing to use a childish email, would not pay for it and they do not really care about the privacy. So who is it for really?
 

Spawn

Administrator
Verified
Staff member

CyberTech

Level 31
Verified
Update
Apple provided a statement to Protocol and said that it made a mistake approving the Hey app in the first place when it didn't conform to Apple's guidelines. Apple said that sign-in only apps are allowed for business services, but not consumer products.

Apple told me that its actual mistake was approving the app in the first place, when it didn't conform to its guidelines. Apple allows these kinds of client apps -- where you can't sign up, only sign in -- for business services but not consumer products. That's why Basecamp, which companies typically pay for, is allowed on the ‌App Store‌ when Hey, which users pay for, isn't. Anyone who purchased Hey from elsewhere could access it on iOS as usual, the company said, but the app must have a way for users to sign up and pay through Apple's infrastructure. That's how Apple supports and pays for its work on the platform.
 

security123

Level 20
I make a quick test from phone and while their security looks good, the privacy and web compatibility need improvements:

- server in USA (this is even enough to not use this service at all)
- third party script & cookie from another USA server

- No DNSSEC
- no IPv6
 

CyberTech

Level 31
Verified
Apple is threatening to remove Hey.com from the App Store if the ambitious new email service doesn’t begin offering an in-app subscription and sharing a cut of its revenue, according to an executive at Basecamp, which makes Hey.

David Heinemeier Hansson, the CTO of Basecamp, said that Apple is acting like “gangsters,” rejecting a bug fix update and asking the company in a phone call to commit to adding an in-app subscription to prevent it from being removed. “I was taken aback by how brazen that threat was,” Heinemeier Hansson told The Verge. “I thought you were supposed to wrap the threats in euphemisms or something. But it was pretty clear.”
 

CyberTech

Level 31
Verified
Apple is not planning to change its App Store rules to accommodate the "Hey" email app that's at the center of a major discussion about Apple's ‌App Store‌ fees and rules, Apple marketing chief Phil Schiller told TechCrunch this afternoon.

Schiller says that there are "many things" that Hey's developers could do to make the app work within the existing ‌App Store‌ rules, and Apple would "love for them to do that."

Hey, an email app created by the team that developed Basecamp, is priced at $99 per year. Subscriptions for the service need to be purchased on the Hey website and are not offered in app because Hey's developers don't want to pay a 30 percent cut to Apple.

The current incarnation of the app offers no in-app purchases and no signup options. The app opens straight to a login screen that lets users know that they can't subscribe to the service in the app. Because Apple does not allow for outside links that skirt its in-app purchase options, Hey also offers no link to the website where users can sign up.
Full article

^thats bullsh*t i feel like Phil Schiller is jealous of Hey and $$$

edit: also check out in the comments and enjoy it
 

CyberTech

Level 31
Verified
Hey — the new email service from Basecamp that’s been the subject of the latest fight over Apple’s App Store policies — has announced that starting today, it’ll be open for anyone to join, no invite code required.

The public launch of the service comes alongside a second piece of good news for Hey: Apple has approved Hey’s update containing proposed changes to meet App Store guidelines. The app’s version 1.0.3 update is now available, offering free, temporary 14-day burner Hey accounts with randomized addresses for iOS users, making the app “functional” by Apple’s definition when it’s first downloaded. Hey is also adding support for multiuser corporate accounts with this update, as Apple had originally taken issue with the purely consumer-focused nature of Hey.
 
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