Robbie

Level 27
Verified
Content Creator
My security lacks everything

ESET Nod32
I love that antivirus! Have you considered Binisoft's Windows Firewall Control? It uses WF platform and gives you some configuration options + notifications for every connection. You then have the power! Also, you may add free tool SysHardener and harden your Windows settings so malware doesn't have anything to exploit! :)
Kaspersky free +Osarmor. I not use extension because the web filter from Kaspersky is Excellent.
Nice one! Have you considered as well to harden your system settings with SysHardener? :)
I am using ESET IS along with AppGuard for my realtime protection. One is default allow and the other is default deny. I think this setup is sufficient to cover any normal user. Unless I do something stupid like disabling ESET/AG it should be hard to get infected. And indeed it's a nice thread to start @RoboMan
Pretty much nothing to add here! Consciousness while surfing! :)
I've been using this combo for nearly a year: WinDefender with CS Comodo Firewall. Two Chrome extensions: Adguard with Emsisoft Browser Security,:)
Wow, I love it! Automatic Sandbox will work great just on its own, but it even has WD signatures now, great move, I've used this combo in the past. You have browser covered too! You may even remove Emsisoft Browser Extension and sandbox the browser ;)
 

devjit2018

Level 10
Verified
Malware Tester
Pretty much nothing to add here! Consciousness while surfing! :)
The only layer I'm still missing is virtualisation. I think Shadow Defender would be a good addition to test unknown files.

Not yet after the format that made to my laptop. Is many job for me because my English is very bad and with the translator I need a lot of hours to avoid making mistakes with the settings. :giggle:
The default settings should be okay I think.
 

Mahesh Sudula

Level 14
Verified
Malware Tester
I use G Data IS..however it lacks a strong anti phishing modules..rest of thr areas are covered mostly
however if i use Forticlient beside it...there wont be any use with G Data except behaviour detection...however Avast extension is ++, but just dont like it personally:)
 

Burrito

Level 15
Verified
I use G Data IS..however it lacks a strong anti phishing modules..rest of thr areas are covered mostly
however if i use Forticlient beside it...there wont be any use with G Data except behaviour detection...however Avast extension is ++, but just dont like it personally:)
I used to be such a fan of G DATA. I used it on multiple machines. I got it all dialed in just the way I liked it. I still have one copy... and I still like it. But it just hasn't kept up with the times -- I think. I hope they make a comeback.

212397
 

ebocious

Level 2
I’m currently playing with two different configurations in Windows, and a lesser one on the Mac:

Mac: BlockBlock, RansomWhere, OverSight, ReiKey
Windows config 1: Cruel Comodo, AppCheck Free
Windows config 2: AppGuard, AppCheck Free

They all have limited accounts, Quad9 DNS, Malwarebytes Browser Extension, Bitdefender TrafficLight, Web of Trust, and HTTPS Everywhere; along with a few hardening tweaks specific to each OS. I also use VT Uploader, LastPass, and NordVPN on my personal devices.
 

AtlBo

Level 26
Verified
Content Creator
@lunarlander...the client software can be used freely no charge. It is designed to be used with the Fortinet firewall hardware appliance, which provides network firewalling support and adds a network-wide sandbox. Even so Fortclient without the device is still anti-virus, web filtering, and anti-exploit, and the Vulnerability detection is also functional. In order to have the FULL features of the Fortinet system, you would need the hardware. Here's a link for Forticlient:

Forticlient - Next Generation Endpoint Protection

There are several program tweaks you can make. If you decide to try Forticlient, I can post someplace the html .config file that adds the tweaks. These are for changes that can't be made in the client software, because they are only accessible in the network management software of the Fortinet hardware. Most of it is signature enforcement related if I recall (aggressive, etc.).
 

ebocious

Level 2
I use common sense, no security software (and haven't been infected for over a decade).

Friends and Family computers go away with Kaspersky and Adguard (custom filters), no complains from anyone regarding malware or performance for a few years now.
"Common sense" is a ridiculous phrase, and completely inaccurate when you consider the knowledge and behavior of the average user; "caution" would be a better word choice. How do you know you're not infected? Modern malware can run on your system without crashes or performance degradation. According to Google, more malware comes from legitimate sites than attack sites. Did you hear about when the sites for Dolphin Stadium were hacked just before Super Bowl XLI, and drive-by malware planted? You don't have to be out looking for trouble when trouble is out looking for you.

"Common sense," both literally and by way of your intended meaning, is security software. I don't use real-time antivirus, but I certainly update my systems and use default-deny solutions. Even the best drivers still wear seatbelts; it would be foolish not to.
 

Local Host

Level 17
Verified
"Common sense" is a ridiculous phrase, and completely inaccurate when you consider the knowledge and behavior of the average user; "caution" would be a better word choice. How do you know you're not infected? Modern malware can run on your system without crashes or performance degradation. According to Google, more malware comes from legitimate sites than attack sites. Did you hear about when the sites for Dolphin Stadium were hacked just before Super Bowl XLI, and drive-by malware planted? You don't have to be out looking for trouble when trouble is out looking for you.

"Common sense," both literally and by way of your intended meaning, is security software. I don't use real-time antivirus, but I certainly update my systems and use default-deny solutions. Even the best drivers still wear seatbelts; it would be foolish not to.
Why the hell would I be worried about targetted attacks, plus is extremely easy to know if you're infected or not by running an on-demand scan if you lack the knownledge to find the malware by yourself.

I myself already removed malware from PCs, that not even Kaspersky could find back in 2008.

Default-deny has nothing to offer me in terms of security, and keeping software updated can be as dangerous as keeping it outdated, CCleaner being a fine example, waiting for feedback is common sense on that.

This is 2019, browsers run in a in-built sandbox by default, is not my problem if a website or corporation gets hacked, it's actually their problem (not inserting sensible information online is part of common sense).
 

ebocious

Level 2
Why the hell would I be worried about targetted attacks, plus is extremely easy to know if you're infected or not by running an on-demand scan if you lack the knownledge to find the malware by yourself.
On-demand scanners cannot detect fileless malware, or polymorphic malware in many cases. Have you ever run a scan outside of Windows, like a rescue disc? Have you checked the network?

I myself already removed malware from PCs, that not even Kaspersky could find back in 2008.
Like Conficker? Mebroot? Yawn. Been there, done that, took pictures. I’ve had a unit delivered to me with a limited account and encrypted partition. The user didn’t know the admin password, and the malware was running at kernel level and couldn’t be terminated. I had to rename the files to cripple it. I've also worked on a machine that took 30 minutes to boot, repair install wasn't working, and the user had a PCMCIA mobile card by a defunct company, and even the PCI Database link was dead. I had to use PCmover to copy the frontend application and user data, and Double Driver to copy the drivers themselves. I laid them on a fresh copy of Windows, and then I was able to run a repair install and wipe out the instability.

Default-deny has nothing to offer me in terms of security, and keeping software updated can be as dangerous as keeping it outdated, CCleaner being a fine example, waiting for feedback is common sense on that.
It certainly can be, if you don’t have a backup/system image. Are you saying you don’t?

This is 2019, browsers run in a in-built sandbox by default, is not my problem if a website or corporation gets hacked, it's actually their problem (not inserting sensible information online is part of common sense).
It certainly is 2019, and there are malwares out there that can break out of a sandbox. You didn’t think modern malware is limited to clicking on a Trojan and keying in your password, did you? I suggest you run Comodo KillSwitch, and make sure you recognize everything listening on the network. Hope this helps!
 
Last edited:
  • Applause
  • Like
Reactions: show-Zi and Robbie

Local Host

Level 17
Verified
On-demand scanners cannot detect fileless malware, or polymorphic malware in many cases. Have you ever run a scan outside of Windows, like a rescue disc? Have you checked the network?


Like Conficker? Mebroot? Yawn. Been there, done that, took pictures. I’ve had a unit delivered to me with a limited account and encrypted partition. The user didn’t know the admin password, and the malware was running at kernel level and couldn’t be terminated. I had to rename the files to cripple it. I've also worked on a machine that took 30 minutes to boot, repair install wasn't working, and the user had a PCMCIA mobile card by a defunct company, and even the PCI Database link was dead. I had to use PCmover to copy the frontend application and user data, and Double Driver to copy the drivers themselves. I laid them on a fresh copy of Windows, and then I was able to run a repair install and wipe out the instability.


It certainly can be, if you don’t have a backup/system image. Are you saying you don’t?


It certainly is 2019, and there are malwares out there that can break out of a sandbox. You didn’t think modern malware is limited to clicking on a Trojan and keying in your password, did you? I suggest you run Comodo KillSwitch, and make sure you recognize everything listening on the network. Hope this helps!
Honestly you're being paranoid and I'm not going to install anything on my desktop, cause I don't need to.