I'm making the switch to...

  • Brave browser

    Votes: 19 16.7%
  • Google Chrome

    Votes: 19 16.7%
  • Microsoft Edge (Chromium)

    Votes: 45 39.5%
  • Mozilla Firefox browser

    Votes: 31 27.2%
  • Total voters
    114
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Burrito

Level 23
Hopefully that's just the Corona virus from Mexico, and not the one from China. ;)
Hopefully.

I've been sorta sick going on three weeks.... and I did fly internationally.

But I think I just got a very virulent strain of the flu.

Or.... maybe I have the Coronavirus and am a danger to you all... through the little-known MT infection vector.

Good times.


IMHO sticking with Microsoft Edge running smoothly and I like the features it has
Have you also tried Brave?


Waterfox for me.
Hmmmm.... you are a pretty credible dude... I guess I'll check this one out too.

Have you tried Waterfox @oldschool?


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Azure

Level 26
Verified
Content Creator
Brave is actually one of the slower browsers to update: 8-9 weeks between updates.
Brave is based on Chromium.

You see the releases for Brave: Release Notes
And for Google Chrome here: Chrome Releases

Brave Upgraded to Chromium to 80.0.3987.122 on Feb 25/26
Google Chrome updated to 80.0.3987.122 on Feb 24 (Look for "Stable Channel Update for Desktop)


Brave Upgraded Chromium to 80.0.3987.116 on Feb. 19
Google Chrome updated to 80.0.3987.116 on Feb 18

Brave Upgraded Chromium to 79.0.3945.117 on Jan 8
Google Chrome updated to 79.0.3945.117 on Jan 7

So no, Brave is not slow to update.
 
After using Opera 3.5x to Opera 12.1x before its demise and switching to Chrome until Start of this year, I did try alternatives like Vivaldi, Firefox, palemoon, sware iron, new Opera, Chromium but seriously all had their shortcomings compared to Chrome. That is until this year and when Microsoft Edge came around. It was a game changer. I've since moved to it on all of my PCs/laptop and replaced people I know browser for it.

Bye bye Chrome.
 

Gandalf_The_Grey

Level 32
Verified
After using Opera 3.5x to Opera 12.1x before its demise and switching to Chrome until Start of this year, I did try alternatives like Vivaldi, Firefox, palemoon, sware iron, new Opera, Chromium but seriously all had their shortcomings compared to Chrome. That is until this year and when Microsoft Edge came around. It was a game changer. I've since moved to it on all of my PCs/laptop and replaced people I know browser for it.

Bye bye Chrome.
Same here (y)
 

Moonhorse

Level 28
Verified
Content Creator
Edge is game changer in future, as it gets more mature...current stable is in baby steps thought and as it is going to be secondary browser as built-in feature on windows its secondary browser atleast

For me , i have used to have ev certificates visible and browsers that still support those are: firefox, opera, vivaldi, comodo dragon

Out of those 4 , opera & comodo dragon update cycle is very slow compared to vivaldi or firefox

And out of firefox and vivaldi, i find vivaldi better solution as its chromium + no any built-in privacy is featured with it > ublock origin for the win

Brave is decent on mobile thought, and gets updates frequently...but firefox preview nightly is the future as stable preview will have ublock origin as built in feature anytime soon


Waterfox is probably fine for some time, but they had android browser out for sometime and it got cancelled after no idea why...so im unsure of their future
 

ebocious

Level 4
Brave is based on Chromium.

You see the releases for Brave: Release Notes
And for Google Chrome here: Chrome Releases

Brave Upgraded to Chromium to 80.0.3987.122 on Feb 25/26
Google Chrome updated to 80.0.3987.122 on Feb 24 (Look for "Stable Channel Update for Desktop)


Brave Upgraded Chromium to 80.0.3987.116 on Feb. 19
Google Chrome updated to 80.0.3987.116 on Feb 18

Brave Upgraded Chromium to 79.0.3945.117 on Jan 8
Google Chrome updated to 79.0.3945.117 on Jan 7

So no, Brave is not slow to update.
You're comparing Brave to Chrome, not Chromium. I didn't say Chrome was fast. ;)
 

ebocious

Level 4
Nope. It lags behind in important updates.
Correct. I like Waterfox because it is fast, not because it is secure. If your browser is a crucial component of your security apparatus, then I would stick with Chrome; at least it's supported by a very large corporation, and has a sandbox and site isolation. That's why I still use Chrome on my Mac, because I can't lock it down as tightly as I can Windows.
 

oldschool

Level 53
Verified
Correct. I like Waterfox because it is fast, not because it is secure. If your browser is a crucial component of your security apparatus, then I would stick with Chrome; at least it's supported by a very large corporation, and has a sandbox and site isolation. That's why I still use Chrome on my Mac, because I can't lock it down as tightly as I can Windows.
I may give it a whirl one of these days just to check it out.
 

Lenny_Fox

Level 12
With Google dominating on-line advertising and tracking (depending on reports Google has 46 to 68 percent of the market) in North America and West Europe, the privacy of Edge-chromium does not need to be better, but the fact that your data lands in a different basket, gives many people the idea that this helps to blur your online preference and consumption profile a little.

As long as Edge-chromium market share remains at Firefox level, I don't think Google is worried about it. I read in an online marketing blog somewhere that the Google-scare tactic added credibility to Edge-chromium as a viable alternative to Chrome. Post conversion satisfaction poll (people moving from Chrome to Edge), jumped after Google started to scare Edge-chromium users.

Normally when people switch (from one brand to another), their perspective on having made the right choice always jumps after the switch, but the scare tactics showed an additional (I think it was 23%) jump in users who were very satisfied with Edge-chromium. There is a difference between satisfied customer and brand advocates. With the additional (23%) jump, most new Edge-chromium users had a Net Promotor Score which was high enough to make them become brand advocates/Edge promotors (to their friends and relatives).

Imagine when every Edge-chromium user would convince two family members or friends to switch to Edge-Chromium, this would kick-start Edge-Chromium market share above 20%. Together with the Microsoft IE11 users, Edge market share could rocket to 30%, making Edge a serious threat to Chrome dominance.

This backfire effect (converted users becoming brand advocates) is probably the reason Google stopped with it (and not a few geeks complaining on security forums) :p Modern marketing is all about data driven decision making (and there are just not enough security/privacy aware people to make an impact).
 
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