Which Adblocker is the best?

  • Adguard for Windows/Mac (Not browser extension)

    Votes: 96 33.4%
  • µblock

    Votes: 15 5.2%
  • Adblock Plus

    Votes: 18 6.3%
  • Ad-Muncher (Not browser extension)

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Other (see post)

    Votes: 11 3.8%
  • µblock origin

    Votes: 148 51.6%
  • Total voters
    287
List of apps to compare
Desktop-based AdBlocking software
Browser-based AdBlocking extensions
What I am most interested about
Exclusive Features & Functionality
Why I want to compare these apps
which adblocker makes his work best and which protects against malware?
Which software/plugins you trust most?

vertigo

Level 2
Correct me if I am wrong but using Adguard desktop means less browser extensions to do what it does, and less extensions means a more generic browser fingerprint and a more generic fingerprint would be better for privacy making Adguard desktop the better choice.
I'm about 98% sure that extensions have nothing to do with browser fingerprinting. Everything I've seen indicates plugins do but extensions don't. So this wouldn't (unless I'm wrong) make a difference. And if it did, anybody that's enough of a power user to be using Adguard or uBO would likely be running other extensions for security and privacy, and then using those and not an ad blocker would only make them stand out from the crowd even more. I've come to the conclusion trying to resist fingerprinting is nearly pointless, since there are so many factors and it's hard to control all of them, and even if you do it's hard to make yourself not unique enough you can still be identified. Firefox's privacy.resistFingerprinting preference is the best bet, but it's also not perfect, and I personally don't use it (yet). If you really want to maintain anonymity, a VPN and/or Tor (TBB) are your only real options, and a VM can help some as well, though it only serves to anonymize your computer, not your connection. So it depends what your threat level is and how much you need privacy.
 
Don't use your real name or real address when you're browsing. They may know exactly everything you do at every second from your day, doesn't matter if they don't know who you are or where you live. Use a VM on another PC for when you need to do something that requires using your real name/address, and after each time wipe the VM clean, change VPN location etc. Since it's a different PC, internet etc. from your daily browsing, they shouldn't be able to relate the two identities (the guy whom we have information on and fingerprints but don't know his real name/address, and the guy whose real name and/or address we know but don't have any information on since he uses that PC only briefly when he needs to do something important)

Problem solved
 

Kubla

Level 6
I'm about 98% sure that extensions have nothing to do with browser fingerprinting. Everything I've seen indicates plugins do but extensions don't. So this wouldn't (unless I'm wrong) make a difference. And if it did, anybody that's enough of a power user to be using Adguard or uBO would likely be running other extensions for security and privacy, and then using those and not an ad blocker would only make them stand out from the crowd even more. I've come to the conclusion trying to resist fingerprinting is nearly pointless, since there are so many factors and it's hard to control all of them, and even if you do it's hard to make yourself not unique enough you can still be identified. Firefox's privacy.resistFingerprinting preference is the best bet, but it's also not perfect, and I personally don't use it (yet). If you really want to maintain anonymity, a VPN and/or Tor (TBB) are your only real options, and a VM can help some as well, though it only serves to anonymize your computer, not your connection. So it depends what your threat level is and how much you need privacy.
Perhaps but that is no reason to make it any easier for them, it they are going to track you at least make them earn it.
 
Reactions: Cats-4_Owners-2

monkeylove

Level 2
I use uBlock Origin with lots of filters and NoScript. Around a fourth of the time for new sites that I visit, I have to configure either (usually the latter) to allow one site or another, usually to allow videos, photos, or images such as graphs to appear, or use the "block element" feature on page popups.